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Filing for Social Security

Category Retirement
Social Security Card
Whether you apply online or in person there are some things to understand when planning to receive social security payments. This guide is about filing for social security.
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Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

October 25, 20120 found this helpful

I am going to be 62 in June of 2013. I want to apply for S.S. and want to know any suggestions on tips to cut back on cable, filing out forms, places I can get help with prescriptions, and help with rent. Any tips on any subjects will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

By Debbie

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Answers

October 27, 20120 found this helpful
Best Answer

Have you looked into income based apartments? Contact your city/county offices and they should be able to provide a list for you. Most states also offer a voucher program for scattered house options in the community. To lower your TV bill, you would need to ask your provider what packages they offer, and probably just lower the number of extras you now pay for.

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June 30, 20140 found this helpful

I am married and living with my husband. We are not sick or anything. My husband is not a US citizen, but is a resident. He doesn't have any taxes paid here in the US. If we were to divorce, or he passed, will I be able to collect anything? I am a citizen. We have been married for almost 11 years. Just asking. Thank you.

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By Sonia C.

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June 30, 20140 found this helpful

In order to get the correct answer, you will have to call your local Social Security Office and talk to them.

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July 1, 20140 found this helpful

I agree with Redhatterb, but I also know from personal experience... You will not collect anything from his death from Social Security if he hasn't paid anything into the program. Sorry to give you such bad news - why don't you go ahead and call Social Security's 800# to find out for yourself; I do believe that I am correct in giving you that for an answer, that you would not collect anything for his death or his children if you have any together, because he hasn't paid anything into the program itself.

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July 2, 20140 found this helpful

I am sorry but I cannot help but wonder why anyone would expect to be paid out of a fund they have never contributed to? I think many people reading your post would wonder how many years have you and your husband lived in the US and paid no taxes?

How have you been living? I do not know but perhaps you have been receiving your "benefits" all along without contributing very much?

You say your husband is a "resident" and I do not know exactly what that means but you say you are not sick so why is he not working and paying taxes?

These are personal opinions and I am sorry if anyone thinks I am being too "nosy" or inconsiderate, but I worked from the age of 8 until I retired. I feel that it is everyone's responsibility to contribute toward their own support.

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July 2, 20140 found this helpful

You certainly have the option of working and paying into SS yourself. Then you would be able to collect SS. You will need to work several years to be eligible.

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June 30, 20140 found this helpful

My mother is retiring from work next year January and she will be 65 years old also in January. My dad has been on disability for a couple of years now, however my mother and father have been divorced for well over thirty years. Can my mother collect any benefits from my father? They were married over 10 years and years ago? Thank you.

By Sonia C.

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June 30, 20140 found this helpful

Call your local Social Security Office and talk to them.

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July 1, 20140 found this helpful

Years ago, the divorced wife could collect benefits from her ex husband if they were married more than 10 years before the divorce. She would receive which ever amount was greater: her own SS or his, not both. My mother and I discovered that she would get more from her own. This may well have changed. You need to go to the SS Office and find out. Need proof of marriage and divorce to check his record, as well as other documents for hers. Hope this helps.

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July 2, 20140 found this helpful

I believe so. The rule Jean described still stands.

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October 3, 20090 found this helpful

I'm 63 and working full-time. When should I start collecting my Social Security?

Bonnie from Tuckerton, NJ

Answers:

Collecting Social Security Benefits

You need to either call the toll free 800 number 1-800-772-1213 for info or have them make an appointment for you to talk to a representative at your nearest SSA office. They will give you a very accurate benefit estimate, discuss how your current amount of wages/self-employment affects the amount that can or cannot be paid, and tell you when you are first eligible to receive benefits.

If your wages are not too high, you may be able to receive a partial benefit. If they are too high, it will not pay for you to file until you are ready to retire or work part-time. You will need your SSN number, date of birth, estimate of what you will earn this year, amount that you made last year, and info on any deceased spouse(s) or divorced one(s) (if married for 10 years+). This is a free service and is very helpful for your retirement planning. I am a retired SSA employee. You do not need to pay for this service. Good luck. (01/21/2009)

By Francie

Collecting Social Security Benefits

I suggest to call your SS office, I think you can get it at age 62, not sure. Good luck. (01/21/2009)

By Kathleen

Collecting Social Security Benefits

Go to socialsecurity.gov and use their calculator online to figure out whether you should keep working to increase your monthly benefits or start taking them when you're eligible. Your date of birth determines when you are eligible to collect your full benefit. There are lots of pros and cons about whether to work longer and collect more or start collecting as soon as you're eligible. Your health, family longevity, lifestyle, etc. would have some bearing on that. Good luck. (01/21/2009)

By fionarx

Collecting Social Security Benefits

Yes, definitely call the SS office. It will depend on how much money you currently earn, how long you want to work (full or part time) and the amount of benefits you are currently entitled to.
If you currently earn a good income (benefits are considered as part of yearly income and will affect/increase your tax base) and you want to work for three more years (next "raise" is at 66) then you might want to wait until 66 in order to receive the "raise" you'll be eligible for.

And if you're one who is earning a good income and in good health and want to wait until 70 then the "raise" is even higher. You have to weigh all factors. Good luck. (01/22/2009)

By Deeli

Comment Was this helpful? Yes
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