Add to GuideAsk a Question
To Top

Growing Hollyhock

Category Flowers
Growing Hollyhock
These biennials are easy and fun to grow. This tall striking plant with its flower lined stalks is an excellent choice in a border or as a garden backdrop against a wall or fence. This is a guide togrowing hollyhock.
Ad

Solutions

Share on ThriftyFunThis guide contains the following solutions. Have something to add? Please share your solution!

By 0 found this helpful
June 7, 2006

Botanical Name:

Alcea rosea

Life Cycle:

short-lived perennial, biennial

Planting Time:

spring or fall

Height:

plants vary in size from 3' to 7' tall
Ad

Exposure:

full sun or light, part-day shade

Soil:

average to rich, well-drained soil

Hardiness:

biennial or short-lived perennial zones 2-9

Bloom Time:

late summer to fall

Flower:

variety of color shades including pinks, reds, yellows, whites and maroon-blacks

Foliage:

green leaves on upright stems holding flower spikes

Propagation:

seeds

Suggested Use:

back borders, accents against walls or fences

Growing Hints:

Purchase plants or start from seed by sowing seeds directly into the garden in the spring to early summer. Plants will bloom the following summer. For possible first year blooms, start seeds indoors in late winter. Hollyhock seeds need light to germinate, so barely cover seeds with soil. Plants may live a third year if you cut off their flower stalks after blooming, otherwise plan to replace spent plants with seedlings to keep a crop blooming each summer without interruption.

Interesting Facts:

The hollyhock is a relative to the hibiscus. Children adore making dolls out of hollyhocks. Use a flower for the skirt. Use a bud to top the skirt with a head (attach with a toothpick) and put another flower on the head to serve as a bonnet.
Ad

Comment Was this helpful? Yes

Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

By 0 found this helpful
September 23, 2007

Geranium?

Geranium?

What is this plant? Sure resembles a very tall Geranium.

Hardiness Zone: 5a

Linda from Bellevue, NE

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
September 24, 20070 found this helpful

Which plant do you mean? The green one with old dried stems sticking up? That looks like a coral bells to me. Oh you mean the big one to the right? Don't know. Gotta see the flower closer up. You need to purchase a garden book with lots of pictures of perennials. Good luck!

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Ad

September 24, 20070 found this helpful

It's a mallow.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
By guest (Guest Post)
September 25, 20070 found this helpful

From what I can see, it looks like a miniature hollyhock.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 25, 20070 found this helpful

Mallow was my first thought, also. Buying a well illustrated perennial book is a good idea, too.

I use mine all the time, even after 26 years of gardening.

You can also google the flower name you need info on, and go from there. Look up "mallow plant," for instance.

The mallow is related to hollyhock.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
By guest (Guest Post)
September 26, 20070 found this helpful

Looks like a rose of Sheron to me. Very hardy

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Ad

By guest (Guest Post)
September 27, 20070 found this helpful

Looks like it may be a mallow

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 27, 20070 found this helpful

This looks like a Hardy Geranium to me. I had these around my house when we lived in the city. They spread and come back every year. Very dainty and pretty I think.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 28, 20070 found this helpful

It looks like a pelargonium to me, which, I have been told, is the Rolls Royce of Geraniums, but I'd have to see the flowers a little clearer. Are they bell shaped, with a dark inner ring surrounding an almost white center?

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 28, 20070 found this helpful

I AGREE WITH SUE ON PREVIOUS POST. IT LOOKS LIKE A MINITURE HOLLYHOCK TO ME. I'm PRETTY SURE OF IT BECAUSE MY MOM HAS HUNDREDS OF THESE IN A VARIETY OF COLORS.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Ad

September 30, 20070 found this helpful

Looks like a wild hollyhock. I got this plant from my mom and the next year had them everywhere.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
By guest (Guest Post)
July 2, 20080 found this helpful

My cousin sent me seeds to plant and this is the same plant that grew for me in Alabama. I asked her and she said she thought it was some sort of hollyhock (miniature) maybe with a name of Melva or Melba? Don't really know.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 9, 20130 found this helpful

Definitely a purple mallow, I have many growing on a bank. They do indeed look like a miniature hollyhocks, and reseed themselves very prolifically. One plant this year will be several next year. The mallow plant has the tall flower stalk like a hollyhock up to 3-4 feet tall. In contrast, a hardy geranium would be a lower growing, (maybe 12-18") spreading plant without the tall flower stalk.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

By 0 found this helpful
August 13, 2009

Should I soak hollyhock seeds before planting? If so, how long must they soak?

Hardiness Zone: 9a

By roma2 from Sacramento, CA

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
August 14, 20090 found this helpful

They don't need soaking. They are biennial though, so unless you start them very early in the season, they might not bloom the first year. There are a lot of varieties that simply self-seed when they are established.

Plant them together with coreopsis, ladies mantle or my favorite: artemisia absinthium to hide the "ugly" stem.

Common names for this artemisia are: wormwood, green ginger, sweet sage. Happy gardening!

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
August 14, 20090 found this helpful

I never soak mine. Good luck.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

March 16, 2009

Can I start holly hock and columbine seeds now and plant them when they start sprouting this spring?

Hardiness Zone: 5a


Jennifer from Peru, IN

Answer Was this helpful? Yes

Answers

March 16, 20090 found this helpful

Yes you can plant the holly hock seed now & transplant them when they get about 6 inches tall. Keep damp when not raining. You will be proud. Some do not bloom first year. They reseed every year after they bloom, you can also transplant them & you can save the seed when the pod gets dry, just before the seed falls out, good luck.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

By 0 found this helpful
July 24, 2009

When should I plant Hollyhock seed?

Hardiness Zone: 7a

By Glavern3311 from Western NC

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
Related Content
Categories
Home and Garden Gardening FlowersApril 29, 2013
Guides
growing gardenias
Growing Gardenias
growing ginger
Growing Ginger
hand holding a bunch of radishes
Growing Radishes
Growing Mushrooms, Cut mushrooms.
Growing Mushrooms
More
📓
Back to School Ideas!
😎
Summer Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Desktop Page | View Mobile

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

© 1997-2017 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Published by .

Generated 2017/08/18 12:58:35 in 1 secs. ⛅️️ ⚡️
Loading Something Awesome!