Restoring Crystallized Honey

Honey has a tendency to crystallize when stored for a period of time. This is a guide about restoring crystallized honey.

Ad
Restoring Crystallized Honey
Filter Sort

Question: Crystallized and Hard Honey

By Sandy 2 2

I have a half-gallon container of honey that has solidified. Can it still be used? How do I liquefy it again?

By Sandy from Bandon, OR

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes

Ad

Most Recent Answer

By Annie Rios Hill 14 1,777 Flag

March 7, 2011

Also squeeze a bit of fresh lime or fresh lemon on the amount you need it will work to soften it quickly just a quick mix and it is liquid.

ReplyWas this helpful? Yes


Tip: Cloudy or Crystallized Honey

You can restore cloudy or crystallized honey to its original state by placing it in a pan of hot tap water. Let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes and it will be good as new.

CommentWas this helpful? Yes

Question: Softening Hard Honey in the Jar

By Gail Ledwith 1 63

I have had my jar of honey for quite some time. Is there a way to soften honey to get it out of a jar?

By Gail

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes

Ad

Most Recent Answer

By Elaine S. 39 243 Flag

May 23, 2011

I do the same as Keeper. I don't think I even go a minute with it, just check it every 15 or 20 seconds, so much easier than getting a pan out , etc.

ReplyWas this helpful? Yes


Question: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

By Tonya 1

How do you keep honey from turning to sugar?

By Tonya from Langley, WA

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes


Most Recent Answer

By metroplex 82 416 Flag

May 13, 2010

Some people say to store the bottle upside down!

My Mom says it works.

ReplyWas this helpful? Yes


Question: Eating Crystallized Honey

Can we eat honey which was kept in fridge, it is crystallised now?

By rd

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes


Most Recent Answer

By Litter Gitter 155 568 Flag

June 18, 2012

I keep my jar of honey on the cook stove and the warmth from the stove keeps it from crystallizing.

ReplyWas this helpful? Yes


Question: Honey Turned Darker

I have a jar of clover honey that was clear when I bought it, but has turned a dark brown color. Is it safe to eat?

By Bob

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes

Question: Softening Honey

How do I soften hardened honey?

By Nancy

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes

Question: Homemade Parsley Honey Crystallized

Has anyone any idea why every time I make parsley honey, once the jar has been opened it has started to crystallize and doesn't stop til fully crystallised in the jar. Each batch made turns out the same. Yes, everything is sterilised before hand.

By Jan

AnswerWas this helpful? Yes

Archive: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Set your jar of honey in a pot of boiling water, lid off and up to crystallization point. Soon the honey will return to its original consistency. How to stop this I have not been completely successful but, I graduate the jar down to the amount of honey and this seems to help.

By Jane Young from Richmond, B.C. Canada

Feedback:

Honey Is Turning To Sugar

I have a jar of honey that is starting to turn to sugar. How can I prevent this from happening again and is there anyway I can correct this?

Thank you,
Mary from Erial, NJ

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Ann (Guest Post)

Keep it in the cabinet. Not in the refrigerator.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

gator10tx (Guest Post)

What's done here is zapping the whole jar in the microwave for about 15-20 seconds, or until the honey becomes liquid again. If there are still crystals in the jar, you could stir them into the melted honey; re-zap the jar if the crystals don't 'melt' right away. Like Grandma Marge wrote, remember to remove the jar lid before microwaving. If not, you could have a huge, sticky clean-up later.

Do not re-place the jar lid until the honey has cooled down. As the air inside a closed bottle cools, in a plastic "bear" shaped jar, it can become misshapen. Once all the honey becomes liquid again, it will remain crystal-free for several months.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

got2bcristi (Guest Post)

I've used raw honey for years and good honey will naturally turn to sugar. When it turns to sugar the best way to liquefy it is to use the hot water method. Heating on the stove or in the microwave may kill its health giving properties. You should be aware that the cooler it is kept the faster it turns, so not keeping it in the refrigerator is really good advice (the bees just leave it in the comb and it stays good for years, even after it turns very dark).

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Louise (Guest Post)

I think everyone has had this happen to their honey, but I have a small trick to keeping mine liquid. When it turns to sugar, place the opened jar in hot water until the crystals are dissolved, then add a very small amount of Karo syrup and it won't crystallize for a long time. It won't change the taste of it hardly any if you don't put too much. Leave it in the cool cabinet. Good luck.

Mary

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Post by Maryeileen

It's called crystallization and I recently read that Tupelo honey will not crystallize. Although I do believe that it is quite expensive.

Putting the jar in hot water will do it, as will putting a glass jar (with the lid removed) in the microwave. However, I would not suggest putting one of those plastic honey bears in a microwave as the plastic is "not" microwave-safe.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Years ago when I kept a few hives of bees I learned a lot about them from a wise old man who kept them. I have no scientific basis on which to base the following claim, but it seems to be true. According to "Mr. Buck", honey crystallizes because moisture gets in it. This can be from a wet spoon, or water vapor being sucked back into the "honey bear", or whatever. I believe this is true.

The various tips to return it to liquid work just fine, but if steam gets into the jar it will sugar up again in due time.

I have read that honey was found in the tombs of Egyptian mummies and was still unspoiled and okay to eat. I don't know if it had crystallized, but I expect those tombs were pretty dry. Anyway, suffice it to say the stuff has a really *long* shelf life. (07/02/2007)

By Alph

Archive: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Set your jar of honey in a pot of boiling water, lid off and up to crystallization point. Soon the honey will return to its original consistency. How to stop this I have not been completely successful but, I graduate the jar down to the amount of honey and this seems to help.

By Jane Young from Richmond, B.C. Canada

Feedback:

Honey Is Turning To Sugar

I have a jar of honey that is starting to turn to sugar. How can I prevent this from happening again and is there anyway I can correct this?

Thank you,
Mary from Erial, NJ

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Ann (Guest Post)

Keep it in the cabinet. Not in the refrigerator.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

gator10tx (Guest Post)

What's done here is zapping the whole jar in the microwave for about 15-20 seconds, or until the honey becomes liquid again. If there are still crystals in the jar, you could stir them into the melted honey; re-zap the jar if the crystals don't 'melt' right away. Like Grandma Marge wrote, remember to remove the jar lid before microwaving. If not, you could have a huge, sticky clean-up later.

Do not re-place the jar lid until the honey has cooled down. As the air inside a closed bottle cools, in a plastic "bear" shaped jar, it can become misshapen. Once all the honey becomes liquid again, it will remain crystal-free for several months.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

got2bcristi (Guest Post)

I've used raw honey for years and good honey will naturally turn to sugar. When it turns to sugar the best way to liquefy it is to use the hot water method. Heating on the stove or in the microwave may kill its health giving properties. You should be aware that the cooler it is kept the faster it turns, so not keeping it in the refrigerator is really good advice (the bees just leave it in the comb and it stays good for years, even after it turns very dark).

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Louise (Guest Post)

I think everyone has had this happen to their honey, but I have a small trick to keeping mine liquid. When it turns to sugar, place the opened jar in hot water until the crystals are dissolved, then add a very small amount of Karo syrup and it won't crystallize for a long time. It won't change the taste of it hardly any if you don't put too much. Leave it in the cool cabinet. Good luck.

Mary

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Post by Maryeileen

It's called crystallization and I recently read that Tupelo honey will not crystallize. Although I do believe that it is quite expensive.

Putting the jar in hot water will do it, as will putting a glass jar (with the lid removed) in the microwave. However, I would not suggest putting one of those plastic honey bears in a microwave as the plastic is "not" microwave-safe.

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

RE: Honey Is Turning To Sugar

Years ago when I kept a few hives of bees I learned a lot about them from a wise old man who kept them. I have no scientific basis on which to base the following claim, but it seems to be true. According to "Mr. Buck", honey crystallizes because moisture gets in it. This can be from a wet spoon, or water vapor being sucked back into the "honey bear", or whatever. I believe this is true.

The various tips to return it to liquid work just fine, but if steam gets into the jar it will sugar up again in due time.

I have read that honey was found in the tombs of Egyptian mummies and was still unspoiled and okay to eat. I don't know if it had crystallized, but I expect those tombs were pretty dry. Anyway, suffice it to say the stuff has a really *long* shelf life. (07/02/2007)

By Alph

Archive: Crystallized and Hard Honey

How can you rejuvenate, crystallized and hard honey?

Thanks,

Joe

Feedback:

RE: Crystallized and Hard Honey

You can either put it in the microwave and heat it or put the jar in a pot of simmering water. This should dissolve the crystals and is should be a good as new! (09/21/2004)

By Kathy

RE: Crystallized and Hard Honey

Microwave until it is back to it's original state. Then let cool and replace cover, it should stay liquid for months. Honey is the only food that never spoils as long as nothing is added to it. It will keep forever and if it crystallizes again just microwave again. (09/21/2004)

By Barbie

RE: Crystallized and Hard Honey

Place the container of honey in your microwave and start zapping it @ high power for 15 second intervals, watching it very carefully. If not, once it reaches its high point it will boil over. Happy honeying. (09/21/2004)

By jbbnb

RE: Crystallized and Hard Honey

Setting it in a sunny window works well too. (09/21/2004)

By MB in WY

RE: Crystallized and Hard Honey

This worked perfectly for me. I've tried hot water and microwaves, but melted bottle both ways.

This time I put the bottle of honey in the dishwasher and the honey melted perfectly! (with no change to bottle shape) I just put it on top of the dishes (top tray) and ran on the normal setting. You can squeeze the bottle a little and close the lid before dish washing it, but I didn't think of that. (11/26/2010)

By fjwagner

Categories
Food and Recipes Food Tips Food FixesJanuary 12, 2013
More to Explore
ThriftyFun on Facebook ThriftyFun on Pinterest Enter a Contest Free Newsletters Ask a Question Share a Post
Related Guides
Restoring a Claw Foot Tub, An old claw foot tub outside.
Restoring a Claw Foot Tub
Honey Mustard Dip Recipes
Honey Mustard Dip Recipes
painting furniture
Making Old Furniture Look New
© 1997-2016 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on February 6, 2016 at 8:15:03 AM on 10.0.1.191 in 1 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
 
All ArticlesSolutionsQuestionsArchives
NewestOldestMost HelpfulLeast HelpfulMost AnswersFewest AnswersBest AnswersRelevance
Site MenuShare a PostContestsAsk a QuestionAbout ThriftyFun
BrowseAll By DateAll GuidesAll QuestionsAll VideosRecent FeedbackLonely Questions
CategoriesBetter LivingBudget & FinanceBusiness & LegalConsumer AdviceCraftsEducationEntertainmentFood & RecipesGarage SalesHealth & BeautyHolidays & PartiesHome & GardenMake Your OwnOrganizingParentingPetsTravel & RecreationWeddings