Add to GuideAsk a Question
To Top

Saving Money on Family Photography

Category Family
Family Photo
It doesn't have to cost a lot to get quality pictures of your family members. This is a guide about saving money on family photography.
Advertisement

Solutions

Share on ThriftyFunThis guide contains the following solutions. Have something to add? Please share your solution!

By 4 found this helpful
September 30, 2011

If the cost of school pictures has gotten too expensive, try this tip. Instead of having the picture taken at school, create your own school pictures. Hang a sheet or blanket on the wall as a backdrop. Have the child stand in front of the backdrop in his/her school clothes. (We had my grandson wear his band pullover.) Using a digital camera and take a few photos.

Advertisement

When you have the one you like, take the camera to one of the many places where you can print out the photos. Create your own package of school photos. Before framing the 8 by 10, we used letters from the scrapbooking section of the craft store to put his name, school, and school year on the bottom of the photo. Behind glass, it looks like the photographer's printing.

By Sandra from PA

Comment Was this helpful? 4

May 6, 2009

We all love those great children's photographs, but who can afford to go to the photographer? Dress your kids (or Grandkids) for that special photograph. My Granddaughter loves to "Play Dress Up", and take pictures.
Advertisement

Use your imagination, the results will be great!

By vguy from Earle, AR

Comment Was this helpful? 3

Cindy Bailey0 found this helpful
December 2, 2004

The secret to taking great family portraits is to have a colorful background, have everyone dress in colors that match or contrast with the background, have plenty of natural light, and take the shots as close as possible.

I just took a Christmas portait of my one-year-old niece. Her dress was red and white, mostly white, so I bought 2 yards of red fabric with roses and two yards of white net-type fabric. I attached the red to the wall with straight pins, draped the net over top, also attached with straight pins. I added a couple of white plastic snowflakes too the wall, attached the same way. Then I handed the baby a snowflake.

While she was looking at it delightedly, I snapped away. Always be sure to have light behind your subject as well as in front of it. The people at Wal-Mart thought we had it down at a studio and wanted the copyright permission, which made Auntie Cindy very proud!

Advertisement

More Tips On Taking Holiday Portraits

A reader asked for some more tips regarding taking your own family portraits.

May I suggest the following:

  1. Even if you don't have a digital camera, don't be stingy with the number of shots you take. Professional photographers will use a whole roll of 24 or 36 on one subject. It's really not that expensive, and you get the shot you want. Besides, you can send the ones that aren't your favorites to friends and acquaintances in those frame-style Christmas cards that you can get at the dollar store. (Or make your own frames).
  2. It's a good idea to move your subject around; change the background, whatever, just in case there is something wrong that you aren't noticing, like something stuck on the bottom of the baby's shoe or something!
  3. With babies and small children, keep snapping, even if they're weeping or pouting or pulling one another's hair! Some of my best shots have been of this spontaneous variety. The perfectly posed ones where everyone is smiling at the camera seem boring after that! (See attached photo of my niece. We had been bribing her with the lollypop she's holding, but we couldn't get it back from her at this point, so I just snapped away. Her mother and my parents--the baby's grandparents--liked this one best of all!) This type of photo gets more precious with the passing years.
  4. Advertisement

  5. Also in this photo, notice that the oversized green ornament matches the background--grass. The green contrasts with the white outfit. The leopard skin makes you think of a green jungle. You get the idea. People don't think of all these things when they look at the photo, but somehow they know the photo looks RIGHT. Also notice that I got down on the baby's level, which gives the photo more depth. The grass in front of her feet is in the foreground where it should be and the background is dark and somewhat out of focus.
  6. Always step back and look at the background before you place the baby/dog/whoever in the setting. Sometimes there is an electric cord or plant that will look like it's sticking up out of the person's head or something. You will need to work really fast once you get your subject in place.
  7. When creating your background, try to create layers so your photo will have depth. For example, in the photo that appeared on this site yesterday, I used a printed fabric, and then gathered the tulle and draped it like a curtain. You don't have to buy new fabric, use what you have on hand, but even for a small baby you'll need at least two yards of each kind. If you don't want anything so fancy, maybe hang a piece of denim and attach a couple of raffia bows. Put the baby in little bib overalls with a bright red shirt and little hiking boots.
  8. You can make your photos more meaningful if you place the baby's favorite lovey or blankey or binkey (or the dog's "mean kitty" toy) somewhere strategically in the portrait. Try to have your background match it. It will bring its own set of fond memories.
  9. If you are sending the photo as a Christmas greeting, give your photo a title or caption or write a little rhyme about it. People just love that. For example, I dubbed the photo that was posted here yesterday as the "Snow Princess in the Desert" because she was holding a snowflake and she lives in Nevada.
  10. Your great photos go to waste if you don't display them prominently and appropriately. Regarding my niece's photo, last year on her first Christmas, I had her sitting on white, star-studded tulle. I bought a large frame (for about $5) which was matted for an 8 x 10. I cut strips of the fabric and covered the mat with them, attaching it with glue stick. Her mother went wild over it!
  11. Finally, keep the photo shoot in perspective and hang onto your sense of humor. In the years to come, you will be so glad you did.

Advertisement
Comment Was this helpful? Yes

By 0 found this helpful
February 19, 2012

My tip involves photography. Today with the help of digital cameras and computers/printers, everyone can be a photographer. One way that I have saved money in this area is I quit visiting photo places like Sears, Walmart, etc. and I started taking my own photos.

When I want to take photos of my children, I do it myself. We can go out in a field, by our barn, to the park, by the lake, beach, on the front porch etc. I can use props like pumpkins in the fall or a blooming bush in the spring. There are many possibilities when you think about it.

Then, I can edit my photos using my computer software making black and white photos, sepia or I can use cropping, and other editing features. I think these type of pictures look more natural than the somewhat "cheesy" and fake backgrounds at photo centers. Additionally, I can save money because there is no sitting fee and I don't have to buy the bigger packages to get the pictures I want. I can print what photos I want when I want them.

If I want a family portrait, I can ask a friend/neighbor for help.

By AugustaDawn

Comment Was this helpful? Yes

Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

December 10, 2008

Does anyone know how much a family portrait runs? I have 12 people and we want to do a "cousins" photo, but we want to have it done by my friend and pay him a fair fee. Not sure what the sitting fees and portrait prices are for something like that. If anyone knows, please fill me in. Thanks!

Jacqueline from Feasterville, PA

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
December 10, 20080 found this helpful

From my experience, the lowest sitting fee I've seen for professional portrait photographers (so not walmart or sears) was about $50 and that gives you an hour of time with them. Sometimes photographers don't charge a fee but require you to purchase prints, this is how they make their money. I'd say if your friend is just going to take the pictures than have you guys digitally fix them and print them yourselves, then $50 is a fair price for their time. (but that's just from my experience!)

Perhaps you can barter with your friend instead?

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
By guest (Guest Post)
December 10, 20080 found this helpful

Call Walmart, Sears or any local department store that takes pictures and ask.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
December 12, 20080 found this helpful

I know Wal-mart has a $5 sitting fee, that is a flat fee, not per person. We just had our pics done there so I know this for a fact, in my area (CA) anyhow...... good luck..

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Related Content
Categories
Photos FamilyApril 2, 2014
Guides
Photo of an old, abandoned house.
Abandoned Building Photos
Vegetable Garden Harvest Photos
Vegetable Garden Harvest Photos
A couple sitting on the beach enjoying their honeymoon.
Saving Money on Your Honeymoon
A woman filling out Christmas cards.
Saving Money on Christmas Cards
More
📓
Back to School Ideas!
😎
Summer Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Desktop Page | View Mobile

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

© 1997-2017 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Published by .

Generated 2017/08/16 00:42:21 in 677 msecs. ⛅️️ ⚡️
Loading Something Awesome!