Old Fashioned Hard Boiled Eggs

I just want to say something about this "newfangled" idea of cooking eggs. All the sites, papers, etc. now claim that you are to bring the eggs to a boil in the water and turn them off and let stand for 15 to 17 minutes. You know ladies, I have been boiling eggs for 43 years. So I tried this way, several times. I ended up with eggs that are not done. When I was 19, I learned to hardboil eggs by boiling them for 10 minutes, at least, at a full boil. My eggs were fine and I never had underdone eggs for years and years. So now, I try to keep up with the times, and I end up with 4 dozen undercooked eggs! And, no I did not cook them all together. I will go back to my regular cooking method which has always worked for me. Thank you for letting me sound off!

By Bonnie from Martinsburg

Editor's Note: Thanks for posting this! It's always nice to know what works and what doesn't work for people. I checked a few of my cookbooks and didn't see any instructions for cooking eggs in this "new-fangled" way. They were in agreement to start the eggs in cold water and bring to a boil. Then you can either continue boiling for 8-10 minutes or reduce the heat to a simmer (still steaming) for 10-15 minutes. Has anyone else had any experience with the "right" way to hard cook eggs?

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

After bringing them to a boil, make sure you cover them with a lid before you turn off the stove. They come out perfect every time.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

Once in a great while I will find that my eggs didn't get quite done enough....or quite hard boiled....did you know, you can just re-boil them!

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I detest green around the yolks. I found that if you start the eggs in cold water, bring to a boil and turn down to a simmer and cook another 11 minutes. Pour off the water and immerse in cold water. P.S. Don't try to hard boil really fresh eggs. They don't peel well. Get them at least a week ahead of when you use them

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

The problem I have is eggs that crack while boiling, resulting in a faux egg-drop soup. What did I do?

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I tried this: http://www.recipesource.com/main-dishes/eggs/01/rec0137.html

for the easter eggs this year. It was time intensive but no eggs cracked, there was no green around the yolks, even after a few days in the fridge, they all peeled easily, and the yolks were centered in the white.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I BRING MY EGGS TO A BOIL. TURN OFF HEAT (ON ELECTRIC STOVE), AND LET SIT FOR 20 MINUTES. NO GREEN, AND PERFECTLY COOKED JUMBO EGGS.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

well, I've had GOOD luck with the "new fangled" way. Just make sure the eggs are covered with water, that it reaches a full boil, then turn off the heat WITH THE COVER ON, and leave them for 15". - Then cover with cold water for easy peeling. No more dark yolks and altered protien!

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

It is true that perfect hard boiled eggs can be cooked while saving on your power bill. The method where you bring the eggs to a boil does work. When I cook hard boiled eggs this way, I start by gently placing eggs in the pot, adding cold water to cover and then sprinkling salt over each egg (to help keep the eggs from breaking open). Then when the water boils, turn off the burner, cover the pot and leave it on the burner. In 30 minutes, remove the pot from the stove, pour out the hot water and run cold water over the eggs to keep them from over-cooking. (The reason that green gets around the yolks is due to over cooking and bringing the iron in the yolks out to the surface). It is harmless and still nutritious, but it looks unappetizing. I have not gotten any green yolks using this method, but my eggs, both large and small are perfectly cooked every time. Just make sure to cover the pot and wait a full 30 minutes. That's the key.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I use cold water, pour generous amount of salt in it, add a dash of oil to help stop a boil over, then boil about 10-15 min. Drain the pan and run cold water over till cool. It is a good idea and easier to peel them if you hold the egg under the water as you peel them.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I cover my eggs with cold water and add about a tablespoon of salt. If egg shells crack, the salt in the water keeps the whites from seeping out. A Tablespoon of vinegar added to the water will also work. Bring to a full boil, cover with a tight fitting lid, remove from the heat and let set until water has cooled to room temp. Remove from the water, and crack the shells, gently pressing them until they are cracked all over the egg. Then, holding the egg under cold running water, peel egg shell away. I have been using this method successfully for several years. Another tip is that boiled eggs will keep in the fridge longer with the shells on. When I store boiled eggs in the Fridge, I mark them with a "B" using a magic marker. Or sometimes, I just add a touch of food coloring to the water that I boil them in. This makes it easy to spot the boiled eggs and not grab a raw one by mistake

Harlean from Arkansas

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

I use my electric Vegetable Steamer & follow the directions exactly (It is hard for us older ones to do what we are told). I can "boil" a dozen egggs at a time, really handy for Deviled Eggs that are a Sunday Supper hit at our house.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

Start in cold water and bring to a full boil. Reduce to heat until a gentle boil. Drain and fill pot with cold water with a handful of ice to stop cooking.

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April 24, 20070 found this helpful

Well, I have a really different way of cooking hard boiled eggs. I have a small appliance called "Eggs Everyway". I don't think they have sold these for years now, but I love it. You can use it to make any type of eggs you like including fried and scrambled. The unit itself is about 12"by 61/2" including handles. It is teflon coated,It has a rack to hold the eggs and a second cup rack for poached eggs. I use mine mostly for boiled eggs. It holds 10 eggs, but you can use less if you wish. If you use a push pin and place a hole in the heavy end of the egg they will not crack. You add 1 cup of water to unit for hard boiled eggs, place the lid on and plug it in. Cook until the light goes out (about 22 minutes) Remove eggs to a pan of cold water, then chill and use as desired. Any one remember this appliance?

Judy in Alabama

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April 25, 20070 found this helpful

I , too, have been cooking eggs for over 40 years. I put the eggs in cold water, add a teaspoon of vinegar and bring to a rolling boil. Turn off the heat (electric stove) cover and let sit for 15-17 mins. Then rinse in cold water until they stay cool. They always peel easily and I never have green (YUK) yolks.

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April 26, 20070 found this helpful

Yes the key is to keep the lid on. I bring the water to a boil, turn off the flame, put the lid on and just leave it sit till the water cools down. Hasnt failed me yet :)

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April 26, 20070 found this helpful

i go for the 10-15 min and it works for me!

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April 26, 20070 found this helpful

well I learned in the 80's the "new fangled way"

and it has worked for me

I have learned what works for me and its ok to

do things another way if it works for you and you

like it

I always try things if they do not go well I learned

that wasn't the way for.

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April 26, 20070 found this helpful

I keep it simple. Just put my eggs in tap water and set the timer for 25 minutes, they need to get boiling and I don't stand there and watch it. I like my eggs to boil for a full 15 minutes. To get the shells off without tearing up the egg you have them in running water after you crack them. The gentleness of the water getting under the shell floats the shell off for lack of a better description. For the most part my eggs aren't torn up anymore!!

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April 26, 20070 found this helpful

I have an egg cooker that hard boils, soft boils, or poaches eggs, and have found that it's perfect for cooking hard boiled eggs. It makes 7 hard boiled eggs with each use. It also makes perfect poached eggs. I haven't used the soft boiled method as yet, but may soon give that a try.

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April 27, 20070 found this helpful

This is a recipe for perfect hard boiled eggs according to Emeril Legasse(sp). Cover eggs with cold water & add salt. Bring eggs to a boil and boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 11 minutes. Drain and run under cold water. I add ice to the water, but can't remember if it was in his instructions. When eggs are cold, I drain the water and shake the pan around to crack the shells and then remove them. If an egg gets stubborn and the shell doesn't want to come off, I hold under cold running water and peel carefully. I read that the fresher an egg, the more trouble it may be to peel.

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April 27, 20070 found this helpful

I have been making hard boiled eggs for years by 1. Use 1 dozen eggs at a time (they will usually fit nicely in the bottom of the pan) 2. Cover with cold water. 3. Bring to a rolling boil UNCOVERD. 4. Turn off stove, removed pan and COVER WITH A LID. 5. Leave the pan like this for 17minutes. 6. Rinse in ice water and place in refrigerator until ready to use. I have never had undercooked eggs. Also you should never use fresh eggs to hardboil. They will not peel well and you lose chunks of the egg white. I always make sure they are at least 1 week old before boiling.

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April 27, 20070 found this helpful

I cook mine the way my Mom and Grandma taught me! Rapid boil and when you take an egg out of the water, count to 3, if the water evaporates, their done.

Old Fashioned but it works :)

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April 28, 20070 found this helpful

Boy Howdy...I got a lot of response from this...mixed as it was. I have to say that I did not use a lid when using the "new method" and that I also do not mind green in my yolk.

About the ease of peeling...I have used older eggs at times and the peeling was not easy either...I don't know exactly what THAT secret is...I feel it is just a crap shoot...do your eggs and take your chances. Thanks for all the insights

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May 9, 20070 found this helpful

I place my eggs in lukewarm water to give less stress to the shell, hopefully preventing a crack.

Very fresh eggs are harder to peel, the older the better. I boil mine for five minutes, let it sit ten or so minutes, then test one by cracking, checking the yellow, then eating it. If it is not to my liking I continue cooking.

ps., my favorite egg recipe is 8 boiled, peeld, sliced eggs mixed into an easy white sauce* with 3 to 8 oz (much fat here!) creamed cheese, and a sml jar of armor star dried beef, sliced up. It adds the salt needed as is a bit salty. * sauce : pour 2 T.olive oil (I use extra virgin), 2 T. flour, mix while warming over low heat; when smooth pour in 2 c skim milk. Stir often, over med heat, scrapping bottom til thickened. Warm the cheese, add & stir til smooth. Add the dried beef(Armor, in a jar), voila'! Great over

Thomas english muffins, toasted and broken up. I'm not getting money for mentioning brands, thats just how I know to make it taste as I like it to.

add a bowl of mixed fruit with coconut and chocolate (girardeli bits!) - and you're offfffffffffffffff! Obviously the writer is hungry or drunk...since I don't drink, it must be the former............Happy eating, I love you all. (really! bless each of you in every way!)

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May 14, 20070 found this helpful

I started boiling my eggs the "new-fangled" way several years ago and I really like it. I used to always get cracked eggs before and now I never do. I can imagine that not using the lid would result in under-cooked eggs. I also am wondering about this "old vs. new" eggs and which ones peel better. Ever since I heard that eggs that are a week or 2 old will peel better than fresh eggs, I always use the older ones to hard boil but lately they haven't been any easier to peel than the fresh ones. Any tips that might help there? Thanks.

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May 14, 20070 found this helpful

The way to have perfect HB eggs every time is to cover eggs with COLD water, cover PAN with a TIGHT FITTING LID & bring to FULL boil... When water boils, turn off the burner leave pan on burner & let eggs sit 20 - 30 minutes (no longer, no shorter)... Perfect eggs EACH & EVERY time! (with no "green" yokes)

*** If you live in higher elevations (above 1500 feet)... leave eggs in for 30 min... if you live at lower elevations leave eggs in hot water for 20 - 25 min.

This is how my grandmother taught me when I asked her why her hard boiled egg yokes weren't "green"... & believe me, this is no "new" way...I've been doing this for 35 years...

Works Great!

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May 19, 20070 found this helpful

Did not work for me either. All the eggs were undercooked. Still need to softly boil them for 10 mins. just like I have been doing for years.

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July 28, 20070 found this helpful

I have to say that all my life (54 yrs) I've cooked my eggs the "new ? fangled way", that is bringing to a boil, turning off heat and letting sit on hot burner for approx. 12 minutes. But, I'm open to trying anything once, so today I will keep them at a low boil for 8-10 min. and see how they turn out.

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March 9, 20150 found this helpful

An easy way to peel boiled eggs - crack the egg by rolling it around on the counter then peel back a bit at either end and fit a spoon, with back of spoon facing up, under the shell and bring it around and around. The shell removes very easy and not bits and pieces of shell are found!

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