Should I Choose Brown or White Eggs?

I was wondering why some chicken eggs are white while others are brown and why such a difference in the price so Googled and read a few different links. It turns out that, depending on where in the world you live, that you might as well buy whatever is least expensive.

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What determines the color of the eggs is simply genetics. Chickens with white ear lobes lay white eggs and chickens with red ear lobes lay brown eggs and there is absolutely no nutritional difference between them. Any difference in flavor is due to what the chickens are fed at the ranch/farm and the more expensive free range eggs (of either color) have unpredictable flavor so the choice to purchase those are a matter of personal beliefs about how chickens are treated for egg production.

So, the bottom line is aesthetics or pocketbook. ;-)

By Deeli from Richland, WA

September 23, 20090 found this helpful

Thanks for sharing this. Very interesting to have read. I love learning new things that are pretty useless. Now I have something to teach my family LOL. I personally like white eggs. The brown ones just don't look appetizing to me. I always thought they dyed the color off brown eggs to make white or vice versa. Thanks again!

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

LOL. I showed my mother this post because her whole life she refused to eat brown eggs because her father told her(when she was little) brown eggs come from dead chickens!

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

This was a trick question in one of our Home Economics tests when I was in high school many years ago and I was the only one to get it right. There is no difference. The white egg is from chickens fed bagged food in commercial chicken houses. The brown shelled eggs come from chickens which eat grasses, etc and are free in a farm setting.

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

I was raised in the country and we had an incubator and raised 100+ chicks every spring. We raised white Plymouth Rocks, tan Buff Orpingtons, and dark rust Rhode Island Reds. They were all fed the same corn and mash, and they were all allowed to eat grass. The white hens laid white eggs, the buff hens laid light brown eggs, and the red hens laid dark brown eggs. My mother always cooked with and fed us the brown and tan eggs because she said they were better for us and they tasted better. She sold all of the white eggs and the brown eggs only if we had too many.

Mother always said the brown eggs were richer and when frying them, the yolks stood higher and had a thicker consistency than did the white eggs.

My information is strictly from personal knowledge. I realize that Google lists many sites that say the egg color is determined by earlobe color. I'm passing this information on just for whatever it is worth. I'm still going to eat brown eggs.

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

I have always been under the impression that brown feathered chickens laid the brown eggs and chickens with white feathers laid white eggs. All we ever had on the farm was the white chickens. I don't know scientifically if this is so or not, but to me it just seems like it is logical.

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

Sorry, but I think there has to be a difference between caged eggs and free range eggs - caged hens are given artificial light, air conditioning, are fed hormones and chemicals and are so crowded in their cages that if one dies it doesn't have the room to fall over. These tortured creatures must produce eggs that are not as healthy and therefore not as good for us as free range chickens

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September 23, 20090 found this helpful

I think there are varieties of chickens that lay blue eggs, green eggs or speckled eggs but you don't see those in the markets.

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September 24, 20090 found this helpful

I had heard that the color of eggs is determined by feather color. Has anyone looked at the ear lobes of both white and colored chickens? Both of these facts could be true.

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September 24, 20090 found this helpful

That's a good question. I have chickens. I have bantams (bantys), they are very small. They lay light brown eggs, except for 1-she lays blue-green eggs. She looks like a crow, she's so small. I also have 20 California buffs. They lay big, delicious brown eggs. We feed our chickens good grains along with vegetable table scraps like lettuce, carrots, apple peels, watermelon. They also dig worms out of the ground and eat bugs.

The shells of the eggs are very tough. It's a good thing, too, because they lay the eggs where ever they want, and they do get stepped on sometimes. Produced eggs for the grocery stores are soaked in chemicals to pasteurize the eggs and that's why they don't taste as good. I agree, chickens that are treated good, and not stacked on top of each other, make me more apt to eat eggs. They shouldn't torchure chickens, or anything else for that matter. I have chickens that are 8 and 9 years old. I never thought a chicken could live so long.

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September 24, 20090 found this helpful

White shelled eggs are produced by hens with white feathers and ear lobes. Brown shelled eggs are produced by hens with red feathers and red ear lobes. There is no difference in taste or nutrition between white and brown eggs unless they are free range. The breed that lays brown eggs eat more than those that lay white eggs.

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September 27, 20090 found this helpful

I tend to agree its the breed of the chicken. Clynn made some excellent views. Where I live I eat brown eggs. Usually they are more costly in price. Not a lot maybe 20 cents more , at least in my area. There are rumours that certain eggs have a more yellower yolk. I tend to think they are the small farm type places. I tend to think todays eggs are rolled out quickly and may have some doctoring up. They give chickens hormones?

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