Organic Mole Repellent

I'm at my wits end! Moles are tunneling under all of my gardens. Over many years, I have spent lots of time improving the soil and removing rocks, all for the moles apparently. How about a couple hints on repelling, removing, and/or coping with the moles? I will not use poisons. Can someone help?

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Hardiness Zone: 5b

By Annelle from NE PA

April 21, 20060 found this helpful
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Some garden centers carry predator urine crystals you can pour in the holes.

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June 30, 20070 found this helpful
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Plant daffodils or any bulb that is in the garlic family it worked for me. I went online to the HGTV site and that is the advise they sugguested. It worked in the fall I planted them and in the spring the moles or voles disappeared. It won't hurt to try!!

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August 1, 20070 found this helpful
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I live in Michigan and have a lot of problems with moles also. I tried traps, poision and everything else with limited success. My garden center in Kalamazoo carries a mole repellent called Repellex. I currently use the granular and have bought the liquid which are both easy to apply. It seems to work pretty well and I buy it twice a year. The packaging says it is made with castor oil, hot pepper, and garlic. The granular definitely smells like garlic! It doesn't bother my dog (who I wish would catch the moles) and the smell is not noticeable when applied. It is considered a natural product and is made from just a few ingredients so I think it is worth trying.

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July 14, 20100 found this helpful
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An odd job for your husband. Human urine poured on the hill will chase them away. Be inventive as to how you collect this product. I used a toilet seat over a 5 gallon bucket in an area where there was privacy. Don't crack up laughing. It worked for me.

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July 12, 20100 found this helpful

Moles are not as bad as you might think, aside from the damage their tunnels can do. They eat grubs and insects, as well as some worms. With them, you see the tunnels. Voles, another common pest here in eastern PA, eat vegetation, and the evidence you might see of them is more like a topless "tunnel" on the grass. You see it more after a spring thaw than in the summer, but you sometimes see the voles, too, they're grey, with a short tail, somewhat bigger than a mouse. Kind of cute, really.

Above ground traps may work with the voles; if you have them, clear any vegetation (such as ivy) away from the bases of trees--they'll girdle a tree and you won't know until it is too late.

For moles, I have heard that they don't like if you are growing castor beans. I don't know how true it is. I have also been told that planting fritellaria (crown imperial) bulbs is a strong deterrent. The bulbs are not cheap, but they make a nice show in the spring, and are otherwise unobtrusive. I have seen recipes online for homemade sprays; but cannot attest to whether or not they work.

You can get traps that you put over active tunnels that will be triggered when the mole goes through the tunnel and will kill them. When we lived in KY, we had a problem, and someone told us those flower "windmills" help--that the vibration drives them away. I had far too many little windmills in my yard with no luck! There may be vibration "machines" available to try, but I wouldn't hang my hat on it. But since I didn't want to use poison (kids/dog), we went with the traps.

I suspect your only luck will be in killing them, unfortunately. As long as there is food in your garden (and with healthy soil, you will have worms; and if you're organic, grubs) they will stick around.

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July 12, 2010 Flag
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Q: Does anyone know an organic way to get rid of voles/moles aside from
cats?

Hardiness Zone: 4b

Thank you!
Anni-b from Victor, ID

A: Hi Anni,

Moles and voles can be tough to get rid of in the yard and garden. Here are some organic techniques to help control their populations.

Voles: They enjoy gnawing on bulbs and the roots of shrubs and trees, but seldom do damage to the yard. Voles are related to mice and are more apt to be seen above ground. They seek out protected places, so removing any protective cover (like controlling tall grass, weeds or brush) is essential to controlling them. Keeping your lawn mowed short for a period of time should also help curb populations. You can also consider live-trapping them (traps available at www.haveaheart.com or hardware stores), just make sure that after you catch them you relocate them at least 1/2 mile away from populated areas (in an overgrown field, etc.). Live traps can be baited with peanut butter and oatmeal or with bits of apple. Critter-repellant.com also sells a granulated deterrent called, "Shake-Away" that is made to smell like the urine of the vole's natural predators. Although I've never tried it, "Shake-Away is also said to work on moles.


Moles: These guys are slow moving and have poor eyesight so you will seldom see them above ground. Moles produce ridges as they tunnel searching for food and usually have a larger impact on the yard. Their main tunnels usually run along fences, foundations, tree stumps or other protected areas, and they also create tunnels that may only be used once. These abandoned tunnels can make parts of the yard feel spongy when you walk on them. Moles feed almost exclusively on insects like earthworms and grubs, but will sometimes damage roots, bulbs and tubers in their attempt to find food. They are most active in the early morning and late evening and are solitary by nature. If your problem is limited to a garden bed, try lining the area with 1/2 inch galvanized wire mesh. You can also try live traps, but do it in the spring (after a rain is best) when their tunnels are closer to the surface. Other organic controls include physical barriers dug down into the soil (for small areas), repellents that contain castor oil or castor beans (thought to upset their stomachs-possibly causing them to move on), or sound barriers (e.g. pushing the base of vibrating windmills, or children's pinwheels into their tunnels causes disturbing vibrations).


Good luck!

Ellen

About The Author: Ellen Brown is our Green Living and Gardening Expert. Click here to ask Ellen a question! Ellen Brown is an environmental writer and photographer and the owner of Sustainable Media, an environmental media company that specializes in helping businesses and organizations promote eco-friendly products and services. Contact her on the web at http://www.sustainable-media.com

Answers:

Organic Mole Repellent

Put hot red ground pepper in their runs, but you have to keep doing it, and do it in many different places to get rid of them. They will eventually get the hint.

(04/10/2006)

By Susan in Omaha

Organic Mole Repellent

Try putting pieces of chewing gum at the opening of their holes or along the paths where they run. Sounds funny, but it works! (04/10/2006)


By nancy80501

Organic Mole Repellent

I do and it works, for a long, long time. Mix two parts castor oil to one part liquid detergent (check the ingredients, I use Ivory). Whip the mixture in a blender until the consistency of whipped cream. Take a few heaping tablespoons of it and mix it in a sprinkling can of warm water (about a gallon or even two). Go around the entire area and sprinkle the ground (after a rain is ideal so it soaks in deep).

I used it between my plants first to run out anything in them then went around the entire garden. When I saw how good it worked I did my whole yard (about two acres) and that was the end of the moles until this year. No more expensive exterminators! My sister paid a small fortune to have them come in and exterminate for voles and still had them. One good dose of this and they were gone. (04/10/2006)

By got2bcristi

Organic Mole Repellent

I put moth balls down the hole, and that did it for me. (04/15/2006)

By Nancy

Organic Mole Repellent

Some garden centers carry predator urine crystals you can pour in the holes. (04/21/2006)

By Katmommy

Organic Mole Repellent

I heard sticking human hair in the holes will discourage them. (04/28/2006)

By JILLSAVES

Organic Mole Repellent

Plant daffodils or any bulb that is in the garlic family it worked for me. I went online to the HGTV site and that is the advise they suggested. It worked. In the fall I planted them and in the spring the moles or voles disappeared. It won't hurt to try. (06/30/2007)

By Linda

Organic Mole Repellent

I live in Michigan and have a lot of problems with moles, also. I tried traps, poison, and everything else with limited success. My garden center in Kalamazoo carries a mole repellent called Repellex. I currently use the granular and have bought the liquid which are both easy to apply. It seems to work pretty well and I buy it twice a year. The packaging says it is made with castor oil, hot pepper, and garlic. The granular definitely smells like garlic! It doesn't bother my dog (who I wish would catch the moles) and the smell is not noticeable when applied. It is considered a natural product and is made from just a few ingredients so I think it is worth trying. (08/01/2007)

By Mark

Organic Mole Repellent

I just purchased organic mole and rodent repellent from Lowe's. It is safe in vegetable gardens. (04/27/2008)

By Gary

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