FDA Warning Regarding Bagged Fresh Spinach

FDA Warning on Serious Foodborne E.coli O157:H7 Outbreak One Death and Multiple Hospitalizations in Several States

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an alert to consumers about an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in multiple states that may be associated with the consumption of produce. To date, preliminary epidemiological evidence suggests that bagged fresh spinach may be a possible cause of this outbreak.


Based on the current information, FDA advises that consumers not eat bagged fresh spinach at this time. Individuals who believe they may have experienced symptoms of illness after consuming bagged spinach are urged to contact their health care provider.

Given the severity of this illness and the seriousness of the outbreak, FDA believes that a warning to consumers is needed. We are working closely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local agencies to determine the cause and scope of the problem, said Dr. Robert Brackett, Director of FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN).

E. coli O157:H7 causes diarrhea, often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death. To date, 50 cases of illness have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including 8 cases of HUS and one death.


At this time, the investigation is ongoing and states that have reported illnesses to date include: Connecticut, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin.

FDA will keep consumers informed of the investigation as more information becomes available.

Source: FDA.gov

September 15, 20060 found this helpful

My local newscast said to be safe toss out even the frozen spinach

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September 15, 20060 found this helpful

While I am glad that this announcement went out in time to hopefully save people from very serious illness or even God forbid, death, it is so sad for farmers and such a waste. I'm sure a larger percentage of the spinach that was on the market was ultimately safe, than was tainted. Why can't the government pinpoint specifically where the spinach came from instead of saying that ALL spinach on the market is potentially contaminated? While I know this is like comparing apples and oranges, I heard a guy on the news earlier say that a broad recall like this is like there being a problem with one make of car, but then the government tells Americans not to drive any car!! Would I eat spinach right now? No! But there has to be a better way to handle this. I just hate to see that food being wasted, knowing most of it is probably fine!

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