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Using Ivermectin to Treat Ear Mites

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Ear mites are disgusting and painful. Cats and kittens get them all the time. Dogs do sometimes also.

The vets often prescribe Acarexx. It is an ear mite treatment for cats and kittens. It contains 0.01% ivermectin. Ivomec is a 1% Ivermectin injectable solution which can be bought without a prescription. It is used for cattle and swine. The one percent ivermectin is available online, and at Tractor Supply in the form of Ivomec. Like Acarexx, Ivomec contains 1% ivomectin. Rescuers and wildlife rehabbers frequently use this to treat ear mites. They use ivomec 1% solution topically in the ears.

After I learned that a bottle could last for about 33 years, I figured it would be a nice thing to research. I did some reading and I am sharing this information with you. I am not a vet nor have I had any medical training. I am sharing what other rescues and rehabbers do to help their animals. (Believe me, they are not in it for the money.)

What we do with the Ivomec is make a soluton to swab the ears of kittens and cats. For kittens, the amount of Ivomec is so small that it must be diluted with mineral oil. One part 1% ivomectin or Ivomec to 3 parts mineral oil.

Mix well, shake well, and the dosage for kittens as young as 4 weeks is as follows: 1 drop per pound of kitten. Most four week old kittens are one pound in weight. Adult cats get 0.1 ml for massaging in the ears. The adult cat dosage does not have to be diluted.

In wild and domestic rescues, it is not feasible to go to the vets and pay for each and every cat, dog, or other animal that comes through the door having ear mites.. There could be hundreds of animals a year that come through their doors. This is also used to prevent heartworm, but we can discuss that later, so as not to get things mixed up.

You will need to have a diabetic syringe (minus the needle) to measure the correct amount of Ivomec. First, carefully clean off any ear wax and gunk that is built up.

Do not attempt to clean your dog's ears or check for ear mites using cotton swabs, such as Q-tips, or other pointed objects. The inside of a dog's ear is delicate, and you may damage the eardrum by inserting a cotton swab too deeply. Then massage in the ivermectin as follows:

For Cats:

I suggest trimming the very tips of the cats claws first. If not, get someone else who knows how to restrain a cat to hold him or her for you. This can be tricky.

For an adult cat, the dosage is 0.1 ml slowly squirted and massaged into the cats ear canals, undiluted. Dont do it quickly where the squirt from the syringe minus the needle makes a noise. Cats do not like sudden noises. Soft and gentle and quicly is the key.

Putting a towel over the cats head like an umbrella is a trick I learned to but it most likely won't get shaken out since it is so thick.

For kittens the amount is too small to measure, so it must be diluted with mineral oil.

Dilute 1 part 1% invermectin with 3 parts of mineral oil. Once the Ivomec is diluted this way then they would get 0.05 ml per pound or one drop per pound of kitten. This is to be massaged into the ear, not given orally.

Repeat in three weeks to kill any mites that were not killed the first time around.

For Dogs:

It's very important to verify with our vet that your dog has an ear mite infection before using this treatment. Ear mites are relatively uncommon in dogs and they are much more common in cats. It would be dangerous to treat for mites if the eardrum was not intact or in one piece from an infection.

Useing a 1 cc syringe minus the needle, you administer .25 for each ear. Invermectin is very easily absorbed through the skin.

You may also dilute the dogs dosage in the following way.

Add 1 cc invermectin or Ivomec 1% solution to a 2 fluid ounce (60 ml) bottle. Then fill the bottle with mineral oil. Shake well before using to mix the ivermectin evenly. Apply 0.3 cc/ml to each ear and massage in. Repeat in two weeks if needed.

There are about 30 ml in 1 fluid ounce, and 10,000 mcg ivermectin in 1 cc of 1% solution, so you end up with 60 ml containing 10,000 mcg ivermectin, the same dosage as Acarexx. This will be enough to treat 100 dogs (200 ears).

Considerations:

Note that this dosage may not be high enough for larger dogs. Also it's unclear what acarexx is mixed with. Mineral oil is safe for use in ears, but ivermectin may not mix thoroughly with it, meaning that the dosage would not be the same throughout the mixture.

Propylene Glycol could be used to mix with instead of the mineral oil. It would distribute the amount of ivermectin evenly. If propylene glycol is put in the ears of a dog that has a ruptured eardrum from an ear infection, it could cause deafness. That is why in dogs, it is better to get a vet to make sure the dog has ear mites. I have seen lots of rescues vouch for the mineral oil mixture, so I would probably trust it more than the propylen glycol. It is your call.

I hope this has given you something to think about regarding the health of your pets, and a most common problem, ear mites.

her places to buy fewer of them.

Other uses of Ivomectin include heartworm prevention, as in Hartgard and a certain type of mange, and also intestinal worms.

The dosages for intestinal worms and mange would be around thirty time the dosage for heartworm prevention. There are some dogs who are sensitive to this high a dose because of a genetic abnormality. That is why I will discuss these uses in a different article.

Blessings, and enjoy a happy and healthy life with your pets.

Resources

By Robyn Federspiel from Tri-Cities, TN

Feedback Forum

Feedback about this article is posted here. Want to contribute? Click above to post feedback.

By Robyn Fed [388]03/30/2012

I am putting the following information here, read it in it's entirety, and

Also check to see if your breed is one of the dogs that might be sensitive to this. There is a list further down of the breeds that may be sensitive.

I am not dealing with mange on this article. I am not comfortable with the high dosages of this that would be needed to deal with mange..so I will not put the info here.

Here we go:

A couple of helpful hints. When purchasing the syringe just ask for an insulin syringe. Saves a lot of explaining at the pharmacy and it is marked in tenths. Also..., ticks will drop off a dog on the Ivermectin protocol - another plus. Ivermectin will rid your dog of any intestinal parasites EXCEPT TAPEWORM. Those devils seem to be able to tolerate it. I just take off the needle after I draw it up and shoot it directly into their mouth. Don't forget to dilute the 1 % unless you are using the sheep drench

Otherwise this is a very safe dosage for most pets. Sorry for the length, take notes on what is applicable to your pets as you read.

Some Notes on Heartworm Infestation in Dogs

From my Wildlife Rehab Friend.

This was interesting info which I wanted to share with you regarding heartworm infestation. Also at the end there is a treatment for cat ear mites. These people work with these problems all the time, so it is something they know about.

Here it is:

We have GOT to educate people about heartworm.

It is NOT the quick death sentence that so many have been led to believe!
Adopting out a HW+ dog, who is on ivermectin ( Heartgard) should not be... a problem.

It's exactly the same as the monthly preventative treatment. (variations do exist).

I'm sure that it happens, but I have yet to see a HW+ dog who is even showing symptoms.

The slow-kill treatment WORKS and is far safer for the dog than the ridiculously overpriced, and dangerous Immiticide.

*Amber Technology makes an herbal product called HWF that will clear HW in about 4 months as well.

*NOTE:
Some breeds such as Australian Shepherds, Collies, and a few others can carry a mutant gene that makes them Ivermectin sensitive.

This is the chart for the injectable liquid for cattle etc. NOTE that it is NOT INJECTED in the dogs, just put it in their food or directly in their mouth.

A 1cc ( 1ml) syringe ( available at feed store or pharmacy ) is perfect for measuring. Get a diabetic one if you can.

You'll need needles to draw it out of the bottle. The dosing below is broken into much smaller increments than the prepackaged Heartguard & other brands.

*Also, technically you only need to treat once every 6 weeks ( for preventative ).

They say every month because that's easier for us to remember.

There are several different protocols for slow-kill heartworm treatment.

Some say just give it to them once a month like normal prevention.

Others say to dose them more frequently.

I do ours just on the regular prevention schedule.

The toxic dose of ivermectiin for dogs is VASTLY larger than the dose required for heartworm treatment/prevention, so don't freak out about getting it perfect.

Obviously you want to be careful, and not make a gross error, but it's highly unlikely that you would ever OD a dog on this.

*EXCEPTIONS - Some Australian Shepherds, Collies, Border Collies, and a few others ( not Heelers) carry a gene that makes ivermectin highly toxic to them.

These dogs typically have 4 white feet/legs, but not always.

Here are some more breeds I found that can be sensitive:
Commonly affected breeds include the Collie, Australian Shepherd (all sizes), Shetland Sheepdog, English Shepherd, Old English Sheepdog, McNab, German Shepherd, Long-haired Whippet, and Silken Windhound.

High dosages of ivermectin are considered safe for all dogs except those with the MDR1 gene mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin and other drugs.

*There is now a test available to screen for the presence of the mutated MDR1 gene that causes this problem.


HEARTGARD EQUIVALENT Dogs weight = volume of 1% undiluted Injectable IVERMECTIN solution 50ml $35.99 ( at my feedstore )

See this link for better dosages and any warnings of breed sensitivity and not using it with Comfortis.

http://dogaware.com/health/ivomec.html

Ivomec Dosage Instructions for Heartworm Prevention

I don't endorse the extra-label use of liquid ivermectin for dogs, but I'm concerned that people are using it improperly, subjecting their dogs to potentially dangerous levels (for some dogs) of ivermectin.

See below for information on how to properly dilute Ivomec 1% solution in order to make it safe to use for dogs. You can use 0.08% sheep drench undiluted.

I have also worked out the amount of ivermectin in Acarexx, used to treat ear mites in cats (and off-label in dogs), which might be useful for people who cannot otherwise afford to treat a large number of dogs.

Contact me privately for more information (my contact information is at the bottom of the page).
Contents

Introduction
Ivermectin Sensitivity

Ivermectin Efficacy

Directions for using 0.08% sheep drench

Directions for Making 30:1 Dilution of 1% solution

Directions for Making 9:1 Dilution of 1% solution

Directions for using Ivermectin powder

Buy Ivermectin, Propylene Glycol and Glycerin

About J&R Enterprises Ivermectin Blend

How the Calculations Were Done

Disclaimer: I am not a veterinarian, nor do I have any formal training in any medical field. The information presented here is not meant to replace your vet's advice or prescribed medications, but only to suggest additional options to explore, based on your dog's condition.

Introduction
Liquid ivermectin (Ivomec) is available in 1% injectable solution for treating cattle and pigs, and in 0.08% oral solution for treating sheep (the 0.27% solution has been discontinued).

In most cases, you will need a syringe (no needle) that measures to the tenth of a cc to administer.

Note that all of these products are given orally and not injected into the animal.

Ivermectin 0.08% solution made for sheep can be used undiluted.

An 8 oz (236 ml) bottle of ivermectin 0.08% solution costs around $28, and would be enough to treat 70,000 pounds of dogs.

Ivermectin 1% solution is more readily available but cannot be used undiluted even for very large dogs.

Without diluting the ivermectin solution, the amount to give is too small to measure accurately.

The proper way to use liquid 1% ivermectin solution for dogs is to dilute the ivermectin with propylene glycol (or possibly food-grade (USP) glycerin --

I have not actually seen instructions using glycerin rather than propylene glycol, but liquid ivermectin injectable solutions are made with 40% glycerol and 60% propylene glycol).

Some people have used vegetable oil instead because it tastes better and is easier to get, but the drug will not mix as well with oil and so the dosage within the solution may not be even.

A 50 ml bottle of ivermectin 1% solution costs around $35 and would be enough to treat 150,000 pounds of dogs.

There are instructions below for creating a 30:1 dilution, which works best for small dogs and can also be used for large dogs, and also instructions for creating a 9:1 dilution.

See additional information below under How the Calculations Were Done.

Keep Ivomec and any unused mixture refrigerated. The length of time the diluted mixture will remain potent is unknown.

Ivermectin Sensitivity

Note that the dosages listed below are the same as is used in Heartgard, but it's safe to give a little more.

For example, when using Heartgard Green for dogs weighing 26 to 50 pounds, the dosage used is calculated for a 50-pound dog, while a 26-pound dog would get twice as much per pound of body weight.

Heartgard Blue is used for dogs weighing up to 25 pounds, so a 5-pound dog would get five times as much per pound of body weight as a 25-pound dog would.

Dosages as high as 50 times the amount used to prevent heartworms are used to treat mites on dogs (demodectic mange).

(This is where the treatment can get tricky since the dose is so high for mange.)

High dosages of ivermectin are considered safe for all dogs except those with the MDR1 gene mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin and other drugs.

Commonly affected breeds include the Collie, Australian Shepherd (all sizes), Shetland Sheepdog, English Shepherd, Old English Sheepdog, McNab, German Shepherd, Long-haired Whippet, and Silken Windhound.

There is now a test available to screen for the presence of the mutated MDR1 gene that causes this problem, see Multidrug Sensitivity for more information.

Very high doses of ivermectin, such as are used to treat demodex, are also problematic if combined with Comfortis (spinosad), a newer flea-control product that increases the risk of neurological side effects from ivermectin.

Dogs infected with heartworms may suffer an anaphylactic reaction from the death of too many microfilariae at once when given very high doses of ivermectin as well.



Ivermectin Efficacy

Recent information has come to light that Heartgard may be only 95% effective, rather than 100% effective, in preventing heartworm infections.

That means it will destroy 95% of heartworm larvae, not that 95% of dogs receiving Heartgard will remain heartworm-free.


The dosage of ivermectin used in Heartgard was the lowest found to be 100% effective at killing heartworm larvae when the product was originally approved.

Since lower doses were less effective, it's possible that higher doses may continue to be 100% effective.

Higher doses of ivermectin are safe for all dogs except those with the MDR1 mutation. Dosages as high as 50 times the amount used to prevent heartworms are used to treat mites on dogs (demodectic mange).

Very high dosages may also be problematic for dogs infected with Heartworms, and those being treated with Comfortis. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.

It may be best to double the amount of ivermectin you give your dogs in order to potentially provide better protection from heartworm infection.

Again, this does not apply to dogs with the MDR1 mutation.

Note that higher doses of ivermectin are unlikely to be more effective against the resistant strain of heartworms that has been identified in the Mississippi River Valley. Advantage Multi, which uses moxidectin, was the only product found to be 100% effective against the resistant strain in one small study.

See New Information Regarding Heartworm Resistance for details.

Directions for using 0.08% sheep drench
Dosage using Ivermectin 0.08% solution (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

up to 14 pounds: 1 drop (0.05 cc)
15 to 29 pounds: 0.1 cc
30 to 58 pounds: 0.2 cc
59 to 88 pounds: 0.3 cc
89 to 117 pounds: 0.4 cc
118 to 147 pounds: 0.5 cc
1 cc of ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution contains 800 mcg; 0.1 cc = 80 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.034 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, or approximately 0.1 cc per 30 pounds of body weight.

Directions for making 30:1 dilution of 1% solution

Mix 30 parts propylene glycol to 1 part ivermectin 1% solution. Shake well before using to mix the ivermectin evenly. Refrigerate any unused portion.

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution at 30:1 dilution (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

< 6 pounds: 1 drop (0.05 cc)
6 to 12 pounds: 0.1 cc
13 to 24 pounds: 0.2 cc
25 to 36 pounds: 0.3 cc
37 to 48 pounds: 0.4 cc
49 to 60 pounds: 0.5 cc
62 to 72 pounds: 0.6 cc
73 to 84 pounds: 0.7 cc
85 to 97 pounds: 0.8 cc
98 to 109 pounds: 0.9 cc
110 to 121 pounds: 1 cc

To make a small amount of the mixture, you will need a 1 cc syringe that measures accurately to the tenth of a cc. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivermectin solution in a 1 cc syringe, and mix well with 3 cc of propylene glycol, giving you 3 ccs at a dilution ratio of 30:1. This is enough to treat 300 pounds of dogs using the 1% solution.

To make larger amounts of the mixture, use a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, which is 30 ml. Put 1 ml of ivermectin solution in a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, then fill with propylene glycol. This will be enough to treat 3,000 pounds of dogs (e.g., 300 10-lb dogs or 150 20-lb dogs) using the 1% solution.

1 cc of ivermectin 1% diluted 30:1 contains 333 mcg; 0.1 cc = 33 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.0824 cc (approximately 0.1 cc) per 10 pounds of body weight.

Directions for making 9:1 dilution of 1% solution

Mix 9 parts propylene glycol to 1 part ivermectin 1% solution. Shake well before using to mix the ivermectin evenly. Refrigerate any unused portion.

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution at 9:1 dilution (you may want to double these doses for better protection):
up to 18 pounds: 1 drop (0.05 cc)
19 to 36 pounds: 0.1 cc
37 to 73 pounds: 0.2 cc
74 to 110 pounds: 0.3 cc
111 to 147 pounds: 0.4 cc

To make a small amount of the mixture, you will need a 1 cc syringe that measures accurately to the tenth of a cc. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivermectin solution in a 1 cc syringe, and mix well with 0.9 cc of propylene glycol, giving you 1 cc at a dilution ratio of 9:1. This is enough to treat 333 pounds of dogs using the 1% solution.

To make larger amounts of the mixture, use a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, which is 30 ml. Put 3 ml of ivermectin solution in a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, then fill with propylene glycol. This will be enough to treat 9,000 pounds of dogs (e.g., 90 100-lb dogs) using the 1% solution.
1 cc of ivermectin 1% diluted 9:1 contains 1,000 mcg; 0.1 cc = 100 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.0272 ml (approximately 0.03 cc) per 10 pounds of body weight.
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Directions for using Ivermectin powder (this product appears to have been discontinued)
Dosage using Ivermectin powder (you may want to double these doses for better protection):
up to 25 pounds: 1/8 teaspoon
26 to 50 pounds: 1/4 teaspoon
51 to 65 pounds: 1/3 teaspoon
66 to 100 pounds: 1/2 teaspoon
101 to 150 pounds: 3/4 teaspoon
Over 150 pounds: 1 teaspoon
5 grams of ivermectin power contains 1,000 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.136 grams per 10 pounds of body weight. The company says that 1 teaspoon weighs 5 grams, but people who have weighed a level teaspoon of the powder have found that it weighs 2.8 grams. Based on this information:
1 level teaspoon (2.8 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 560 mcg ivermectin
1/4 tsp (0.7 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 140 mcg ivermectin
Give 1/4 tsp per 50 pounds of body weight.

Buy Ivermectin, Propylene Glycol and Glycerin

Amazon
Ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 8 oz (236 ml), $28 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $57 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 1% solution, 50 ml, $29 plus shipping
Jeffers Livestock 1-800-533-3377
Ivomec 0.8% sheep drench solution, 4800 ml, $231 plus shipping (no longer offering the 960 ml size)
Privermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $50 plus shippingIvomec 1% solution, 50 ml, $34 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 1% solution, 50 ml, $32 plus shipping
Propylene glycol, 1 gallon, $20 plus shipping.
Glycerin, 1 gallon, $25 plus shipping.
Valley Vet 800-419-9524
Ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $71 plus shipping.
Privermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $50 plus shipping
Ivomec 1% solution, 50 ml, $36 (free shipping).
Propylene glycol, 1 gallon, $19 + shipping.
Glycerin, 1 gallon, $31 + shipping.
The Chemistry Store 800-224-1430
Propylene glycol, 1 quart, $12 + shipping.
Glycerin, 1 quart, $11 + shipping.
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About J&R Enterprises ivermectin blend

Several people have contacted me about this product. The 0.0461% dilution they use would contain 461 mcg of ivermectin per 1 cc of mixture. According to the company, ivermectin is mixed with high quality propylene glycol.
The dosage they recommend is about two to three times what you would get in Heartgard, which should be safe for all dogs except possibly those with the MDR1 gene that makes them sensitive to ivermectin (see Ivermectin Sensitivity above).

This dosage may even provide better protection against heartworm infection.


How the calculations were done
Heartgard dosage is a minimum of 6 mcg/kg (2.72 mcg/lb). Note that dogs at the lower end of the weight ranges get twice this much, or even more for very small dogs. Ivermectin has a very wide safety range; dosage for dogs with demodex is 300 mcg/kg, and this amount may be given daily over weeks or months. It's important not to underdose your dog, which may not be effective at preventing heartworms. Always round up when calculating dosage.

Heartgard Blue for dogs up to 25 pounds has 68 mcg ivermectin
Heartgard Green for dogs 26-50 pounds has 136 mcg ivermectin
Heartgard Brown for dogs 51-100 pounds has 272 mcg ivermectin
Ivomec 1% solution:
1 cc of ivomec 1% contains 10,000 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 1,000 mcg ivermectin
1 cc of ivomec 1% diluted 9:1 contains 1,000 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 100 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.0272 ml per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.03 cc per 10 pounds of body weight.
1 cc of ivomec 1% diluted 30:1 contains 333 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 33 mcg ivermectin.
The minimum dosage is 0.0824 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight.
Ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution:
1 cc of ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution contains 800 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 80 mcg ivermectin.
The minimum dosage is 0.034 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.1 cc per 30 pounds of body weight.
Ivermectin Powder for swine:
5 grams of ivermectin power contain 1,000 mcg ivermectin
1 gram of ivermectin powder contains 200 mcg ivermectin
The minimum dosage is 0.136 grams per 10 pounds of body weight.
The company says that 1 teaspoon weighs 5 grams, but people who have weighed a level teaspoon of the powder have found that it weighs 2.8 grams. Based on this information:
1 level teaspoon (2.8 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 560 mcg ivermectin
1/4 tsp (0.7 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 140 mcg ivermectin
Give 1/4 tsp per 50 pounds of body weight.
Measurement notes:
1 drop is approximately 0.05 cc
cc is the same as ml
Note that you should always round the dosage up, not down. It's fine to give a little more than is needed, but if you give less, your dog may not be protected.

For the most part, larger dosages are safe, as long as your dogs are not infected with heartworms (in which case, very high doses may kill off too many microfilariae at once, which can lead to an anaphylactic reaction), or if your dogs have the mutation that makes them more susceptible to ivermectin.

Even then, as long as you're close to the dosage above, you should be fine, it's just when you give 10 times as much as you should or more that you might run into trouble. This is quite common if you follow recipes on the internet, which often leave out the fact that the ivermectin must first be diluted 9:1 with another liquid, making the dosage ten times what it should be.

http://web.archive.org/web/20061104194714/http://www.heartwormsociety.org/katrina.htm

"Be careful when calculating doses and administering ivermectin solution, as the concentration in most available solutions is very high compared to the dose needed for small animal treatment. Remember 1% solution = 1 gram/100 ml = 10 mg/ml = 10,000 ug/ml [ug=mcg]. . . . People often dilute 1% solution with 99 mls of propylene glycol [dilution ratio of 99:1], to create a solution that is 100 micrograms per ml. The preventive dose of ivermectin for a 10 kg [22 lb] dog then would be .5 mls."

http://www.espomagazine.com/vet/apr96.htm

"As mentioned in that article, the dose of Ivermectin necessary to treat or prevent intestinal parasites is about 30 times the dose used to prevent heartworm disease.
The dosage you listed, 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, is the dosage recommended for the prevention of intestinal parasites and heartworms [thus, it's 30 times higher than needed to prevent heartworms alone].

Therefore, if you wish to use the cattle wormer, Ivomec, as a heartworm preventative only, the amount needed would, indeed, be too minute to measure accurately. One way to solve the problem is to dilute a small amount of Ivomec in vegetable oil or propylene glycol (a solvent sometimes used to treat bloat in livestock). The vegetable oil tastes better, but the drug will mix better with propylene glycol because that is the same liquid used to dissolve the Ivermectin in a bottle of Ivomec.


"One dilution scheme which would minimize waste would involve using a 1 cc syringe and the more common 3 cc syringe. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivomec., using the small syringe, and mix well with 3 cc of vegetable oil or propylene glycol [this is a dilution ratio of 30:1]. Using this diluted product, the heartworm preventative dose would be a familiar 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight. A larger amount could be diluted and stored in the refrigerator for future use, but the length of time its potency would remain is unknown."

If you have any questions or comments, please contact me. My name is Mary Straus and you can email me at either dogaware@comcast.net or web@dogaware.com.



.

Another way we use Ivermectin out here is to mix .001 ml. with a tablespoon of propylene glycol and swab the ears of a cat with ear mites. It is the only ear mite treatment I know that will absolutely kill ear mite infestation.

By LittleNana-3 [3]03/29/2012

How can I get the heartworm information?

By Frugal Sunnie [11]03/15/2012

Great info and links, well written and easy to follow. This is definitely one for the printer!

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