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Training a Dog to Not Poop Inside

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We adopted an 18 month old Cocker Spaniel around 3 months ago. She goes all night with no problems and in the morning she does her business fairly quickly. We take her out a least 6 times a day and we walk her around a mile every day. She seems to poop around 3 or 4 times a day. Is that a problem? She does poop in the living room a least once every day or two. Can anyone help?

By Michael from Media, PA

Recent Answers

Here are the recent answer to this question.

By heather inwood [10]02/21/2011

Try collecting some poop & placing it in an area of your garden that you want her to do it. Leave it there until she gets the message, take her out to that spot each time you take her outdoors, often dogs poop just after eating a big meal for the day & in the mornings. Cleanse carpet totally so that no smells linger of previous mess. Steam clean or use baking soda mixed with white vinegar & water, not disinfectant as this has ammonia in it which smells like urine to them & will continue to attract the dog to that spot. Good luck.

By Sandra Mercer [8]02/21/2011

Make sure you have her on a dry dog food, not canned food. It helps make the wasted more dense and thus less poop.

By Myrna [13]02/18/2011

Is she doing her business the same time daily? If so, take her outdoors and walk her awhile at the time. You might get lucky and she'll emliminate outdoors. Also, she's used to the carpet and there may be hidden residue that keeps drawing her to the carpet. Watch her closely as she circles around the room deciding where to drop her bomb. Then take her outdoors at this point.

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Archive: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

Does anyone have advice on how I can train my dogs to go to the bathroom outside 100% of the time? My male is fully trained, but my two females sometimes sneak to another room to do their business. I let them out often, but sometimes as soon as I let them in they will go off and poop in the house. I am expecting a baby in four months and desperately need to get this under control. Please help!

Kristina from Ontario, Canada


RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

We had 2 poodles who would poop inside every night when I was a teenager. I hated waking up in the morning to clean their mess! We figured they did it there because the previous owner's dog used the same spot as their very own private "back yard", so the smell was already there (down inside the carpet padding) when we moved in to the home. (This is most likely why I've never had the inclination to own a dog). I don't have the total answer, but I believe part of the answer is to remove the smell, because most animals are ruled by their noses and smell oriented. Also, remember, just because you can't smell "their calling card", doesn't mean they can't.

Here's what I'd do as a good starting point: Buy an enzyme based spot and odor neutralizer like "OUT!" (Walmart $4.79). It has a light vanilla scent and comes in a spray bottle. Once you have the odor totally removed from the carpeting or floor, your problem will be half way solved. You'll now have to get the dog psychology information from someone who knows more than me!

For complete directions how to remove all traces of pet odors, read my post here:
http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf36405218.tip.html

PS. Worse case scenario, you may have to remove the rugs to re-train your dog. (05/05/2008)

By Cyinda

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

After completely cleaning the area that they are using, place their food dish on top of the area. Animals will not "potty" where they eat. Keep feeding them in that area for a few days, then slowly move the dish. This is the only way I could break my Dad's rotten little mixed breed from using the carpet. (05/05/2008)

By karen_SC

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

Go out with them, take them to the same spot and praise, praise, praise when they get it right. Take them the same time always as a regular thing. Dogs like a happy owner, and if they should make a mistake in the beginning ignore it. Soon they will look forward to happy time. It worked with my dogs. A little more work I know, but you want to get them trained. (05/06/2008)

By NellieMary

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

Could your female dogs be going in the house because you are pregnant, as a show of jealousy? (05/07/2008)

By thriftmeg

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

Ok, NellieMary is totally on the right track. Another addition to her idea is when they "have an accident" in the house, tell them "No" firmly, but gently (do not rub their nose in it!). Take the "leavings" outside where you want them and show the dogs where it is, and then praise them for the "stuff" being outside. Learned this from a VERY stubborn English Pointer puppy. :) (05/07/2008)

By Shosha

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

When I trained my dog to do her business outside I used newspaper inside, and when we went outside I brought the newspaper outside with us. Worked great and only took a week. Good luck. (05/07/2008)

By cece

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

First off, it's useless and counterproductive, actually, to discipline your dogs after they mess in the house. The only time to say a firm "No" is if you catch them in the act. Don't get angry, and take them immediately outside if you catch them in the act. If you come home to the mess, try not to react, take them outside and clean it up without them seeing you. You don't want them to associate the mess they made with you speaking to them, giving them attention, etc.

Getting rid of the smell with an enzyme cleaner is a good idea, and moving the food dish to that area can work if they have one area they seem to be doing their messes in.

Educate yourself about positive reinforcement training, especially as it relates to house training. There are lots of websites with tips, and a great book (and website) to start with is Karen Pryor's "Don't Shoot the Dog." It will help you with all your dog behavior needs.

NOTE: I recommend you being to childproof your dogs in preparation for bringing your baby home. There is too much to go into here, but a great book to start with (check to see if your library has it or can get it) is "Childproofing Your Dog: A Complete Guide to preparing your dog for the children in your life" by Brian Kilcommons. It has great advice and it's not too long or hard to understand. It's in simple, easy to follow, language and it's well-organized so you can find the information you are looking for. (05/08/2008)

By Oberhund

RE: Training A Dog To Not Poop Inside

Oh, and I forgot to add that sometimes some dogs are fussy about doing their business if the spot has poop in it already. So make sure the area is pretty free from poop. (05/08/2008)

By Oberhund

Archive: Training a Dog to Not Poop Inside

I have a 3 year old dachshund who from 8 weeks on was pad trained. Now I am living in a house and am trying to break her of the pad. Any suggestions?

Read More...

Archive: Training a Dog to Not Poop Inside

My dog always poops in the house. How do I get her to stop without crating?

By Bella from Viex Carre


RE: Training a Dog to Not Poop Inside

First how old is your dog now? Second, if it is still a puppy, crate training is the way to go. If introduced to a crate as a pup, dogs like crates. Covered with old bath towels or a blanket, it recreates a sort of den, and dogs in the wild sleep in dens. It's a comforting place to sleep where they feel protected and will rarely relieve themselves in it unless they simply cannot hold it. Never use the crate for punishment, it is not a jail. Only close the crate when you cannot be there to let him outside at the appropriate time. (07/18/2010)

By Beth

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