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Does Yardley of London Make Cosmetics

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Does anyone know if Yardley of London still makes cosmetics? I wore them all time when I was in high school in the '60's. The color range was gorgeous and they felt so good on your skin! Also loved their fragrances: light and sweet, I don't like the strong, musky perfumes they have today. Yardley's web site only has bath products. A mail order source would be fine.

Joan from Chesapeake, VA

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Recent Answers

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By Phillippa B.01/19/2014

Yes they, they have a full range in South Africa. You can buy online at takealot dot com, I don't know if they deliver overseas. Dischem here in SA has the biggest selection.

By Phillippa B.01/19/2014

Yes they, they have a full range in South Africa. You can buy online at takealot dot com, I don't know if they deliver overseas. Dischem here in SA has the biggest selection.

By Thom11/14/2010

Yardley has gone through a succession of owners since the late 60's when they were privately owned and a major cosmetics giant. Each owner has seemed to further erode their image and product line. In the late 1970's Jovan purchased it, and discontinued what was left of their cosmetics line. The current owners Lornimead, are only putting the emphasis on floral fragrances, they have changed English lavender, it no longer has that warm, deep fragrance, but is much lighter and actually smells cheap. At first it appeared that they were going to revive some of the old products, but they have said their only emphasis is on producing floral fragrances. So do not expect to see any cosmetics under the Yardley name in the future. Here in the us, the only thing you can find in the stores are the soaps, and only lavender and oatmeal and almond, none of the others, i don't see how they are selling anything, you can't find anything else even in a dollar store. I can remember when all the department stores wanted Yardley, today the products just take up space on the shelves, and the stores discontinue it. The company won't answer an email, great customer service, and their page on Facebook won't allow you to leave a comment. I honestly believe all the comments on there are put there by the company to try and make themselves look good. They don't have much of a line today, and i can't believe anyone is breaking down their doors to purchase those cheap smelling fragrances they make today. Its very sad to see, but Yardley is a far cry from what it use to be, and i doubt it will ever be an important name in cosmetics again.

By Colin Turner10/15/2009

Feather Finish Pressed Face Powder is still available. It is now made by Mayfairperfumes Ltd who purchased the brand from Yardley Of London when it went into receivership. All shades of Feather Finished can be purchased from http://www.mayfairperfumes.com/
or http://www.perfumeshopping.com/designer-cosmetics.asp.

By Joan [13]10/13/2009

I just went to the Vermont Country Store web site and all I could find there in the Yardley products was the fragrance line. They had 4.2 oz. bottles of perfume for $45.00. They also had talc and bar soap. The scents were Lavender or Lily of the Valley.

By Colin Turner10/13/2009

Hi! The Old Feather Finish Pressed Face Powder range is still available. When the Old Yardely & Company went into liquidation, the Feather Finish range was acquired by Mayfair perfumes Limited, who can be contacted as below: Hope that this helps.

http://www.mayfairperfumes.com/contact.html or http://www.perfumeshopping.com/
With Best Regards, Rewind

By BelfairsRose (Guest Post)02/14/2009

Does anyone know why Yardley stopped making cosmetics in the first place? I, too remember the Cellophanes lipstick line, the Pot Rose and Pot Coral lipcolors that came in a little jar and were applied with a finger (very trendy back in '70) and a nail polish called Plum Parency -- not to mention their fragrance, "Oh! de London". I'd love to see some other company buy their old formulas and start making those products again.

By Magnolia. (Guest Post)10/15/2008

Yardley made wonderful make-up. My very first lipstick, when I was a teenager, was a lipstick Yardley made called, "Sugar Pink". I'd grow new wisdom teeth to have a tube of that again.

By Diana of Los Angeles, CA (Guest Post)09/18/2008

Has anyone else noticed that while brands keep getting trendier their ingredients keep getting cheaper and less effective or pleasant smelling than their predecessors?

I too am a Yardley of London fan (preferring the Oatmeal-Almond scent). And while I do recall Yardley talcum powders and colognes, I do not recall their cosmetic line because I am too young. Without a doubt, however, I would try them if there were anywhere left to buy them. Part of the appeal is the fantastic scent but the other reason I rave over Yardley of London products is that they look so much more classy in the home. With competing products I feel the need to dump them in more decorative containers, whereas Yardley of London has a tasteful packaging design that doesn't cheapen my decor. (And with so many scents to choose from among, there's a color to match just about any home.)

Drug Emporium used to carry Yardley products before they went bankrupt. Longs Drug Store was another location where I used to see a decent selection of Yardley products. While I had them in plain sight, I took for granted that they would always be available. Now that they are not easy to find, I can't get enough of them.

Drug Emporium stores were somewhat of a mess and failed, I feel, insofar as they didn't keep up a squeaky-clean modern appearance. However, Drug Emporium was by far the largest and most diverse product carrier in the personal care segment, and that's saying a lot in the sprawling Southern California region where cookie-cutter retailers such as Target, Walmart, Sav-on (now CVS) and Walgreens appear around every corner. For this reason, I am saddened to see them go along with all the other products I can no longer obtain short of mail order, it would appear.

At Drug Emporium it was not at all difficult to find the oldies but goodies such as Tabu lipstick for just $6 a tube compared to $15 at the Vermont Country Store. When I bought Tabu in my 20s I was too young to realize it had such a long history. All I knew was that it stuck in place, feathered less and was more comfortable to wear than the 16-hour lip color that even my mother's Coty Cosmetics outlasted back in their heyday. I came back to the store a few years later to replace the color  yes, that's how long this super-dense tube of Tabu lasted  but Drug Emporium no longer carried it. Only then did I hit the 'net to find that Tabu, too, had a long history of loyal customers.

I have to ask myself why quality products like these aren't on store shelves? Coty killed their otherwise steller line with dated "grandma graphics" on their product labeling  as a graphic artist, that's my take anyhow  and now they're gone too.

I may be too young to remember when these brands were the the choice of trendsetters, but it doesn't take a granny or a rocket scientist to realize that nothing is made the way it used to be. Yet most of us are conditioned to expect that paying more for a product means that it is superior to one that costs less. With enough hype, marketers know we will willingly pay 10x more for 10x less the quality and the younger consumers among us won't even notice the tradeoff (and I'm talking about the boutique brands here too).

My guess is that market viability continues long after these brands are discontinued, but because their original formulations contain less water and instead favor more concentrated, quality ingredients, manufacturers have chosen to phase such brands out rather than to give their packaging a face lift. Pricey department store "moisturizing" lip color brands, for example, are seemingly designed to wear down in 6 months or less whereas a tiny dab of Tabu or Coty lip color went a long, long way (and stayed put!). Manufacturers have seemingly realized that if they make their product less concentrated they can get us to open our pocketbooks that much more. I've seen this trend in the grocery stores  less yogurt and ice cream in the container for the same amount of money that once bought a more generous quantity  and even more so in bath bars, whose recent advertising campaigns are boasting reformulated "moisturizing bars", ingredients that essentially make the bar feel stickier, run out faster, lather less effectively and deposit inordinate amounts of soap scum on bath and shower surfaces compared to original "hard soap" formulations. Every which way I look, manufacturers are gradually eliminating market alternatives that would have shown these modern competitors up for the poor quality they actually are. Has anybody else noticed this trend? If not, it's time to get the word out!

If you haven't concluded as much by now, I am a younger person  if you count mid 30s as young  who eschews trendy bath and body stores in favor of hard-to-find classics. Another pure gold product I prefer Jergens Original Scent lotion and hand wash with intoxicating Cherry-Almond scent. But for the recent labeling revisions that make the bottles look so darn generic and ugly with their '80s-flashback pink-and-turquoise color scheme, Jergens Original Scent Lotion and Hand Wash are still around. That's the good news. But for how long? Every time I see the stuff, I'm wiping out store shelves just in case.

Ironically, I didn't go out searching for retro products, they found me. I am now a loyal customer, driving from city-to-city and store-to-store if I must, to locate favored products. (In addition to Yardley of London's triple-milled bath soap, I also prefer Dial's 20+-year-old hypoallergenic "Pure & Natural" bath soap, now renamed "Dial Basics", which is unfortunately an inferior copy of its former self.)

Why do I go to the trouble to post such a detailed comment? Because I hope that manufacturers aren't just holding focus groups behind closed doors but are in addition availing themselves to the Internet to learn what consumers really want. Why, after all, neglect a market segment that may otherwise go untapped? Contrary to what these manufacturers might think about their oldie-but-goodie lines, many of us are in the target demographic, not retirement homes!

If my guess is correct, personal care product manufacturers need to understand that for some consumers the loyalty is in the memories the product evokes, while for others the loyalty is in discovering a quality product for the first time. It's all new when you're too young to remember what your grandmother or great grandmother shopped for. And that, in a nutshell, is why product discontinuations based solely on the age of the product in question should be taken off the table. If you've got loyal customers don't serve them to your competition on a silver platter, by all means give the product a face lift, a fresh marketing campaign and carry on!

Bottom line? Retro is hot nowadays. Everything else is, well, commonplace. Opting to purchase products that take more time to find results in the feeling that the product is far more exclusive than the many mall brands with their noxious chemical scents (and for someone like me, with asthma, those artificial fragrances are not just an aesthetic issue). Cosmetic and personal care manufacturers should capitalize on the type of product shopper who would search the far reaches of their community and the Internet, if need be, before opting to give up a favorite product. Those of us who seek out products that are nostalgic, rare, sophisticated and, above all, a good match between value and quality, want to continue enjoying access to them, and not just online or via mail order, either.

Please don't underestimate us.

By c (Guest Post)08/29/2008

They are still around but not making cosmetics any more. The Dollar Tree near me still sells the soaps and they smell as wonderful as ever but I quit using them because they were so harsh on my skin.

By Lisa Mac (Guest Post)08/05/2008

Cant find the makeup! I'm a makeup artist and I have a blusher thats been used so much that its crumbled and I had to transfer it to another container. I love it but cant find another blusher like it. Bring back Yardley makeup!

By sriram (Guest Post)06/07/2008

Nope. Yardley is no more into color cosmetics.

By Wilma (Guest Post)04/11/2008

I too have been looking for a yardley product that I wore in High School. It was the Eye color. It was in a tin box like a watercolor paint set. Pastels, those infamous Blues. All dry and came with a paintbrush. well ok. eyelid brush. You just got a little water on it and viola, beautiful eyes. Yardley is pretty much out of business only offering cologne, some powder and occasionally you can find the Slicker lip color. I would give an arm & a leg for my old tin of dry Yardley eye paint! Whaaa. You would think some one would pick up the torch for us aging beauties!

By L O'Brien [5]01/03/2008

Hello - found Yardley :-

http://www.yardleylondon.co.uk/

It looks like on the website that the cosmetics are not available on the US version of the site. Use the above link and the website gives a US or UK/WORLDWIDE option.

The UK version only has the pressed powder as far as cosmetics go:-

http://www.yardleylondon.co.uk/products_by_range.html

HOPE THIS IS OF HELP - HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Kindest Regards - BORASIC

By L O'Brien [5]12/30/2007

When I left school at 16 (1980) - my first job was in THE YARDLEY BUILDING at Stratford, East London, England. It had a really big painting on the outside wall of a Lavender seller.

I did hear that Yardley had gone into liquidation a while back - whether another company still manufactures in their name I do not know. The only times I see Yardley for sale is in the discount shops - as in End of Line Clearance.
I will have a search for them and post whatever I find.
Kindest Regards - Borasic Lint

By Gayle08/16/2007

I love their oatmeal and the lavendar soaps, which I used in HS too. Found them in the $1 store and bought ALOT. They went into my drawers for sachets. Yummy stuff.

By audrie12 [6]08/10/2007

Hi
Not sure if they have it but a website for hard to find products from the past is: http://www.vermontcountrystore.com
Audrie

By Marcia (Guest Post)08/10/2007

Hi Joan,

In high school in the 60's I loved Yardley mascara! Got to thinking about that maybe a few months back, and I tried Ebay. Found it! To me, it is still the best stuff. Don't know why they stopped importing it back then, but I was so disappointed when they did.

My sister is in London visiting friends, and she promised to bring me back a few tubes :)

Type in Yardley on ebay search, I do remember they had colognes, soaps, etc. maybe your make up too?

good luck

By joy [5]08/10/2007

Yes they are still around.

Google Yardley of London and there are plenty of places from which to buy their products. Or just go to their website at

http://shop1.mailordercentral.com/yardleylondon/

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