Cooking Pancakes

How do you brown your pancakes? I cook mine in a nonstick Farberware skillet with one tablespoon of vegetable oil but I can't seem to get it to brown on both sides. Maybe my skillet is the problem because it is old and worn. Please share your advice.

Onesummer

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June 13, 20070 found this helpful

I cook mine in a cast iron skillet. We bought it at Family Dollar (store) for $5.99, seasoned it well, and now everything we cook on it comes out evenly browned and cooked. Wonderful!

Misty

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June 13, 20070 found this helpful

I was raised in the South, and my mom always used to put a slice of butter into the pan before pouring in the batter. This is the best thing in the entire world. The pancakes get a crunchy, buttery edge to them that is just the best. The Best!!!

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

your pan must be hot, before you put the batter in i always put a small one in first to get the pan just right. also 2 tablespoons of good oil helps they will get nice and brown. hope this works no need for a new pan......

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

A bit of butter in your skillet with the oil will be the secret. A bit of butter with oil will aid in browning most anything...such as hash browns, salmon patties, oinions etc. It only takes a bit, so you can balance it out with a healthier oil.

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

Mine brown everytime, I use the butter non-stick spray, plus make sure you have the pan hot enough before you put in the batter. Good luck!

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

My tip is to preheat the pan and when a little water is sprinkled in the hot pan, it makes a sizzle noise. When this happens, add the shortening (oil, butter) and spread it around, and pour in the batter (keep pancake edges at least 2 inches away from each other to keep from steaming).

Thin pancakes cook faster than thick ones and brown better, too.

Before you flip the pancakes, look to see if little bubbles are forming on the edges. Then flip.

The first side takes longer to cook than the second side.

You may have to cook the pancakes in several batches. Put the cooked ones in a foil lined cookie sheet in a low oven to stay warm while the rest are cooking.

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

My father-in-law taught me that to get the good brown color on pancakes is to add some sugar to the batter. Usually for a batch for 4 I put about 1/8 cup. To get the second side brown aIso, I spray the pan with olive oil before turning it over.

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June 14, 20070 found this helpful

It's hard to get a good Brown on anything that is nonstick, that is why it's nonstick! Browning is the fat and bits of food that "brown" and stick on the pan. I would take the idea of adding butter and give that a try, but not too much! If you add butter to the pan, don't put out the butter for later, with the butter addition to the pan you don't miss it later!

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July 2, 20070 found this helpful

There are some good tips here. My method: I use a well-seasoned cast iron griddle (or cast iron skillet if my griddle is tied up). Melt a bit of butter in it, then wipe it with a wadded paper towel to create a thin film of butter. Use the 'drop of water' trick and if it dances on the surface the griddle is ready. The batter *must* have some sugar in it for proper browning; the sugar caramelizes to brown. After the first side is done, lift the pancake, rub the butter-soaked paper towel around on the griddle, and cook the other side. If your cast iron is properly seasoned you won't need much butter, but if you have a good many pancakes to cook you might have to add a bit and, using the same paper towel, soak most of it up too. Oh, and the tip someone gave about keeping them warm in the oven is right on the money, except I use stoneware plates and warm them before I put the first pancake on them.

One other tip: when my non-stick cookware begins to lose its coating I toss it. The stuff is handy sometimes so I keep a little around, but once the coating is compromised it can flake off and end up in your food, and you don't want to be eating that stuff. To get the best service out of Teflon, Silverstone, etc. NEVER use metal utensils or scrubbing pads, and be careful how you store it so it doesn't get damaged by other pots and pans. Also I never set my burners over MEDIUM HIGH for anything but cast iron, and have even cracked an ancient, thin cast iron griddle using it on HIGH, so be careful about the temp (I sure miss that griddle!). Excessive heat can warp aluminum, and with clad-bottom stainless steel can actually force molecules of the core material through the steel. I'm no doctor but I've read there appears to be a connection between aluminum and Alzimer's, and I do not wish to accellerate my mental decline.

Happy cooking!

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