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Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

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What kind of food is served at a masquerade party or ball?

By AuntyB

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Here are the recent answer to this question.

By Suntydt [75]03/28/2011

I would think finger foods/hor d'oeuvres, something easy to pick up and eat for those people with masks or lots of make up. Cheese and summer sausage on crackers is what I would start with. Various cheeses in cube form with tooth picks. Those little sausages you keep in a slow cooker and eat with toothpicks. Vegetable platter with a couple dips would be good as well.

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Archive: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

I need menu ideas for a masquerade party.

Roberta from Virginia


RE: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

I'm not sure if you mean a Halloween-type of menu, but if you do I have a couple of tested recipes for party appetizers. I always get great reviews.

Deviled Eye-balls:

  1. Prepare hard-boiled eggs.
  2. A few minutes before the end of the cooking time, carefully remove the eggs from the hot water and roll them on a hard surface to crackle to shell (not too hard, but just enough to give an even crackle effect). They will be hot, so use a clean hand towel to handle eggs.
  3. Add red food coloring to the hot water (enough to give it a very dark hue, too little and you will have pink instead of red colored eggs). Make sure to keep the water boiling.
  4. Carefully place the cracked eggs back into the water and resume boiling.
  5. When the eggs are done remove from the water and cool.
  6. Prepare deviled eggs normally.
  7. Use a piece of black olive for the center.
  8. They will appear like blood shot eyeballs.
Snails:
  1. Use Pillsbury crescent rolls and cubed cheese of your choice.
  2. To roll, lay the triangular piece of dough flat, on the shortest side place 2 cubes of cheese (along the center line).
  3. Pull the sides of dough together so the cheese is poking out of the top.
  4. Form the remaining dough into a cone around the cheese.
  5. Starting from the point, roll the dough toward the cheese in the shape of a snail.
  6. Cook per package directions.
  7. The cheese will melt out during baking and appear snail-like with the bread "shell".
Lady fingers:
  1. Prepare your favorite meatball recipe.
  2. Before cooking, roll the meatball into long finger-like shapes.
  3. Place a sliced almond at the end of each "finger".
  4. Bake per your favorite recipe.
  5. Arrange on a tray, and drizzle with sweet and sour sauce (add red food coloring to sauce for a greater gore factor).
(10/03/2006)

By

RE: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

Oh, I would have silver dishes piled with pears and grapes dusted with powdered sugar. Cream puffs for desert are as elegant as fairy cakes. Try Quiche, croissants and souffle. Okay, this is getting very French. Maybe BBQ chicken would fit in. Maybe, biscotti or empanadas. Try a sparkling cider punch in a huge bowl with floating rose flowers in it. You could make pumpkin soup with white pumpkin and pine nuts. I would get a big bunch of cook books from the library if I were you. Have fun! Gloria (10/06/2006)

By may-fairy

Archive: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

At my school I am part of a club and this club is wanting to gain awareness in the community so we are planning to throw a masquerade ball. I was put in charge of food, but sadly I am completely lost. I have no idea what kinds of food are eaten at these types of events. I am also on a very tight budget. So if anyone has any ideas please feel free to share.


Walter from Chillicothe, OH


RE: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

Masquerade or Mardi Gras? Mardi Gras (festival before Lent, best known in LA). For Mardi Gras you could do a lot of red beans and rice, seafood gumbo (if you're on the coast of VA) sausage and chicken gumbo if you're not. This is assuming it's not just chip and dip snacks. Masquerade, I'd go with lots of dessert pastries with powdered sugar and then some casserole that will feed a lot at not much cost (meat and pasta, etc.). See if you can find someone that knows how to make cream puff/eclair (choux paste) dough and make a lot of very small ones. Google masquerade foods. (02/16/2009)

By tennesue

What to serve

Finger foods, anything that people can eat with one hand from a little teeny plate while circulating. It helps if you can find things that don't shed a lot of dust/crumbs (biscuits and other floured-before-baking foods are probably a bad call).

Chips and dip are never a bad idea; buy the largest bags possible, with an eye towards unit price, and get generic colas (and don't forget diet colas, for weight watching folks and diabetics). Also, it would be responsible to provide a couple of fresh veggie trays. You can get bags of pre-cut baby carrots, broccoli, celery, and cauliflower for relatively low prices, and arrange them with a dish of Ranch dressing in the middle.

I don't know exactly what your budget is or how many people will be attending, but I know two things that will help you. (1) It's "easiest" to buy foods that are small already, like cocktail wieners and mini-quiches and bite-sized pizza rolls. (2) It's "cheapest" to buy foods that are larger, prepare them yourself, and cut them down to hors d'oeuvre size (perhaps with a small vegetable cutter).

Enlist the help of some students for a food preparation party before the main event, so you don't have to do all the work yourself. Also ask around and find out if party goers would be willing to supplement your budget by bringing additional chips, dip, and drinks with them. I doubt it, but hey, stranger things have happened. (02/17/2009)

By Chayil

RE: Menu Ideas for a Masquerade Party

One inexperienced person in charge of food? That's a disaster waiting to happen. I strongly suggest that you enlist the help of a teacher, maybe someone from the home ec department (?). It sounds like a great home ec project for a few willing volunteers, and you'll get credit for great delegation, and coordinating really good food ; ) (02/24/2009)

By U*u*U

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