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Keeping Track of My Mileage

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I drive a lot for my job, but only get paid for mileage if I am filling in for another worker. I don't get paid to travel to my regular clients homes. I was wondering if anyone knows of any free downloadable programs I can use to track my mileage for tax purposes? If anyone knows of something I can use for this I would really appreciate it. TIA.

jmz2005 from illinois

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Recent Answers

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By TravisF02/23/2010

Our company CarCheckup offers a product that tracks business mileage in an easy to use format (also without pen and paper). One other bonus feature is that we can also help you if your check engine light comes on on your car. It's all covered by our core technology. You can learn more at http://www.carcheckup.com

By janice [48]06/19/2007

Thank you. I did get one from our local H&R block office. This really helps out.

By B [1]06/18/2007

If you go to http://office.microsoft.com and type in "mileage log" in the search area, a couple of different templates come up that are free to download -as long as you have Excel on your computer.

By Sergios_Boxers (Guest Post)05/06/2007

You can get a free mileage books from H&R Block (tax preparers) they gave one to me and my hubby

By Lee Ann (Guest Post)05/02/2007

We run a tax business. We recommend several ways to do track the mileage: a small checkbook sized calendar that you can keep in the vehicle or your briefcase, planner, purse, etc. Write the mileage on the particular day. Some of your planners (Franklin Covey and Dayplanner actually have mileage pages at the end of each month for you to keep track of mileage for the month) Some clients use a simple Excel (or other similar program that comes pre installed on their computer or Open Office) spreadsheet showing date, client and/or purpose start and stop odometer readings and total miles for each trip. Quickbooks used to make a program called Expenseable that had a mileage reimbursement section. Hope one of those ideas works for you!

By Memere (Guest Post)04/25/2007

The quickest way to keep track is to keep a small dayplanner type notebook in your car. Write down the mileage as you start your trip and then write down the mileage when you end your trip, written on the date of the trip...also say what the trip was for. Any little stops along the way, such as the bank, will be included in this mileage. Either monthly or yearly you can calculate the total mileage for that trip. This gives you a hard copy for the IRS, if you ever get audited. It is simple and has worked for years for those who must keep track. Sometimes "programs" and such just complicate the process. This book is always in your car, so recording things is convenient and easy. The reimbursement rate per mile has been updated by the IRS to take into account high gas prices and all.
Remember easy, simple and convenient is the name of the game.

By Allison [16]04/24/2007

My husband calculates his mileage for tax purposes by using a site like mapquest to get directions from our home to the locations he often drives to. Multiply that times two for the round trip mileage, then multiply that by the estimated number of trips to get the total number of miles. Each year the IRS has a certain mileage deduction. I think it was .44 per mile for 2006 but I'm not sure. Or maybe it was .17 per mile. I don't know, check irs.gov. So anyway after you figure out the number of miles, just multiply by the mileage deduction. That goes on schedule C if you are a sole proprietor, or is part of "miscellaneous itemized deductions" as an unreimbursed employee expense if you aren't a sole proprietor, but only the amount over 2% of AGI is deductible if you aren't a sole proprietor. I'm pretty sure that's how it works, anyway.

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