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Growing Morning Glory in Containers

Question:

I've been thoroughly warned about morning glory! Can I simply plant it in a pot and avoid all the drama of it taking over my garden? Will my moonflowers do the same? All my seeds have begun to sprout... so there is a need to plant soon.

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Hardiness Zone: 10b

Thanks,
Marisa from Santa Maria, CA

Answer:

Marisa,

Yes! Growing morning glories in containers is an easy way to avoid the potential of a hostile takeover in your garden. Moonflowers are not considered as invasive as morning glories, but they also grow well in pots. In fact, I would recommend planting some of each (4 to 5 seeds) together in the same pot. When the daytime blooms of the morning glories fade, the moonflower blooms will replace them in the evening.

There is some debate over whether or not morning glory roots grow best in shallow or deep containers. I have grown them in shallow planter boxes as well as deep containers. They have done equally well in both. The most important thing is that you give them something to climb on. It doesn't need to be a heavy-duty support, just make sure you have it in place before you sow your seeds.

Also, exercise caution when fertilizing. A little compost or a slow release organic fertilizer mixed in with a quality soil is all you need. Too much fertilizer, and you'll get lots of green and very few flowers. I don't use any on mine.

Moonflowers and morning glories are related and have similar growing requirements. Give them full sun and moist (not wet), well-drained soil. Remember that containers tend to dry out quickly, so check their moisture levels often.

Ellen

About The Author: Ellen Brown is an environmental writer and photographer and the owner of Sustainable Media, an environmental media company that specializes in helping businesses and organizations promote eco-friendly products and services.


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March 17, 20080 found this helpful
Top Comment

I live in an apartment and aways grow mine in pots.

Put them on a shelf or a concrete block of some kind, though or their roots will just go throuh the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot.

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March 17, 20080 found this helpful
Top Comment

I've planted mine in large institutional size cans that I've painted. I got them from the local Sr Citizen center,,fruits, veggies, etc come in them. I also plant moon flowers, sweet peas, black eyed susan vine, scarlet bean runners and hyacinth vine in them. My ground is rock hard and I have certain places that I wanted them where there was no dirt. Punch a few holes in the bottom and your good to go.

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March 17, 20080 found this helpful

awesome!!! thanks iv planted them in pots all ready and have been debating on weather or not to pull them up! wounderful! i cant wait to see my first bloom!

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March 18, 20080 found this helpful

Make sure you have a trellis of some sort tho, so you can train them where you want them to go.

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By guest (Guest Post)
March 18, 20080 found this helpful

I am glad you were warned! I was not and I have the darn stuff growing in my yard now! And nothing seems to kill it. I'd appreciate any hints on how to get rid of it for good.

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By guest (Guest Post)
March 18, 20080 found this helpful

Whoops! Seems you have planted them already. My advice would have been not to plant them at all. Here in Australia they are a declared noxious weed, and a no-no to plant. Yes, i know those big purple blue flowers are beautiful.. but...

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March 19, 20080 found this helpful

It's not too late! get it off your property! You will turn your back and it will be off and running, no joke! Surely there's another plant to love, like a clematis?

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By guest (Guest Post)
March 21, 20080 found this helpful

I love my moon flowers and morning glory's. I replant the morning glory's every year. I pull out all the moon flowers every fall, they return every spring but they don't take over the yard. I think it helps to take them out in the fall so they don't spread. The blooms on them are awesome!

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By guest (Guest Post)
July 8, 20080 found this helpful

I am trying to grow morning glories in pots and having no luck, the vines are thin and the leaves small, they then turn yellow and fall off. I have 4 plants in a pot that is 1'X 2.5' x 8" they get at least 6 hours of sun a day the soil is a potting mix, what the heck am I doing wrong>?

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May 4, 20170 found this helpful

I've grown them w tomatoes in pots. I used the vines to tie around the tomatoes. It worked good.

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By 1 found this helpful
September 3, 2011

I recently moved to an older home with a large but not well-cared-for back yard. Aside from cutting back some wild plants and digging weeds, I have not done much to it, yet. It appears that I have some (well-more than some) morning glories growing along the ground. I would like to dig these up and put them in hanging planters.
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I have several questions about growing them in hanging pots. Will the plants survive transplanting? Will they hang down instead of growing up if I do not put a trellis in the pot? Are they self-seeding? (I assume since they really are considered weeds by some that they do spread by themselves). I have included a picture. If these are not morning glories does anyone know what they are?

By BeaC from San Francisco, CA

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September 6, 20110 found this helpful

Those leaves don't look like morning glory, and I don't see that it's a vine either, but it's hard to tell with the picture (not enough detail). Could be moss rose. Any chance you can post a picture that's closer in?

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September 6, 20110 found this helpful

It looks like the morning glories that I'm always combating in my yard, but a clearer photo would be nice. I don't think there is much you can do to kill them. I even find them in my garden shed and growing up through the walls into my garage.

You should be able to pull up a long white root and plant it anywhere. I would probably bury a bunch of the green vine in the pot as well so that you have it come up several places.

Do let us know how they turn out. I have a love-hate relationship with the stuff. Pretty flowers but it is insidious!

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September 6, 20110 found this helpful

Your picture looks like something called "Bindweed" which is a weed, all though it is related to domesticated morning glories. I would get rid of it if you can or it will take over anything else you may want to plant in that area. There are 2 kinds of garden morning glories. One of them starts with seeds and, yes, if planted in a container they will hang down and/or grow up. They aren't particular. These are annuals that come in a lot of colors and propagate themselves with seeds that can wind up everywhere.

The other one is a perennial in my yard (near San Jose, CA) and is seedless. I have seen this one only in blue. It propogates itself by sending out runners that send roots down into the dirt wherever they make contact with it. They are very invasive! That is our single-wide trailer in the photo under all those vines! You could probably keep them under control by only growing them in pots and cutting off the runners.

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September 6, 20110 found this helpful

You can always tell morning glories by the big heart shaped leaves. I tried growing them in hanging planters last year and they were not happy at all. They kept trying to climb UP anything they could reach... like into the apple tree, along the fence, etc. Those I tried to train to grow downwards from the planter always looked a little sick.

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September 6, 20110 found this helpful

I don't think you really want to do this. Field Bindweed is the more common name for the little white morning glory plants and they will take over the world if you let them. I'm sure they'd be more than happy to hang out in your baskets, but you'll have quite a time getting them out eventually.

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Anonymous
February 7, 20170 found this helpful

They look like petunias.

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By 0 found this helpful
March 1, 2012

Will morning glories grow in containers on a deck?

By Joanne

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Answers

March 2, 20120 found this helpful

Yes, they grow well in containers.

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March 3, 20120 found this helpful

They sure will! I grow them in a window box under a trellis every year.

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