Fried Chicken Tips

I've always wanted to fry chicken with flour but it always comes out either burnt or undercooked. Any tips on how to do it just right?

Rosemarie from Lynn, Mass.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

Use Crisco Shortning. Have it about 1/2 inch deep in the frying pan. Place floured chicken in the hot grease 350-360 degrees.

Fry chicken covered with a lid for about 30 minutes. Remove the lid and turn chicken over and fry uncovered about 20 minutes browning the other side of the chicken.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

I agree. Don't be impatient and turn it too often, once is enough.

And keep the heat even. My Grandmother would never cook chicken in anything but a cast iron skillet! Said it did the cooking for her.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

My husband taught me his mother's recipe for Oven Fried Chicken. I don't have to babysit the pan on the stove!

Put about 1/4" of cooking oil in a roasting pan in a preheated 350 oven. While it heating up, coat chicken parts in your flour and spices by shaking in a zip bag. Place chicken in a single layer in the heated pan, then back into the oven for 30 minutes. Turn over and bake for another 20 minutes or so, depending on how brown and crispy you like your chicken. Drain on paper towel lined plates. Enjoy!

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

Go to http://www.foodnetwork.com and search for Paula Deen's recipe for fried chicken. It's a no-fail deal.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

A tip I JUST learned! Dark meat is fattier/juicier than white meat, so in order to keep the white meat pieces from coming out drier, cook them slightly less long than the dark ( if deep frying).

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

You all might laugh at this: When I first read the heading 'Fried Chicken Tips', I wondered " what parts of the chicken are the 'tips'?" Haha maybe the chicken isnt the only thing 'fried' today!

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

I just brown my chicken good in a skillet then transfer it to a roasting pan and put it in a 350*F oven for about 45 minutes. Do not cover it! The chicken has the fried taste and is done but not burned. I can't fry chicken done either.LOL My MIL taught me this and I always "fry" my chicken this way. Hope it helps you.

Hugs, Paula

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

We call this Aunt Debbie's fried chicken. Everyone who eats it cleans the meat right off the bones.

In a paper bag I put a couple cups of flour and add a few dashes of garlic powder, chicken seasoning, salt and pepper.

Wash the chicken pieces and leave them moist with the water. Or you can also soak the pieces in buttermilk overnight or for about four hours before frying. Put the pieces in the bag one at a time and shake until coated. Heat the oil,(I use a cast iron fryer)on the stove top. Turning the chicken every now and then and checking the doneness with a meat thermometer. This is finger licken good chicken! Enjoy!

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

Make sure your grease is deep enough so the chicken can float. Needs to be about 3 or 4 inches deep. Oil must be 350 degrees no more no less!

Dip chicken in a milk bowl. Then dip it in a flour bowl that has been seasoned with salt and pepper.

Dip back into milk bowl. Then re dip to flour bowl. Shake off excess Drop in oil cooking until done, golden brown.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

Cook in cast iron...forgot to add that. That makes a BIG difference.

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January 21, 20090 found this helpful

Start at a temp to brown, then reduce temp to finish cooking. Lower temp produces fully done without burning.

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January 22, 20090 found this helpful

I've fried a lot of chickens in a lot of different ways. The most important thing is not to use an egg wash to get the breading to stick. I also can't use milk for my chicken, so I soak it in a cup of soy milk plus a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar. (Double that if the chicken won't submerse fully in it.)

You can then dredge it in your salted and spiced crust. I've used flour, matzah meal, panko (plain or seasoned), cornmeal, soy flour, finely ground nut flour (during an Atkins Diet phase), chickpea flour, or any other type of flour you want to use. My spices are usually salt, black or white pepper, and ground/dried sage, ginger, paprika, and garlic powder, with some variation here and there just for fun. If you use seasoned panko or other bread crumbs, just drop your seasonings altogether and go with the ones already in the mix.

Heat the oil on medium-high heat (about 350 F) in a deep skillet, no more than 1/3 of the way up the side of the pan. I like Crisco canola oil for this. You're going to want your thickest meat in the center of the skillet because it needs more heat to get the job done, so put your thighs together in the middle, which is good advice for frying chicken as well as for dating. Breasts on the bone will go fairly close to center, too, but breasts off the bone can be around the edges along with the wings and drumsticks.

Once you've arranged your chicken in the hot oil with tongs, set the splatter guard on top, then set the timer for 12 minutes, and then walk away. No, I mean it, just walk away. Your patience will be rewarded. When it's time to turn the chicken, turn it in a relaxed way even though the oil will boil and spit (use your spare hand to hold the splatter guard between you and the excited oil), then set the timer for another 12 minutes and walk away. Seriously, walk away. Don't keep turning the chicken or checking it, because turning it too often will make the chicken tough.

When the timer beeps, remove chicken to a rack which is turned upside down and resting atop a stack of old newspapers, to wick away the fat. Pour out most of the oil (or conserve it by draining it in a strainer with a coffee filter), but leave one or two tablespoons to use for making gravy... which is another post, but then, I'm sure you already know how to make excellent gravy.

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January 22, 20090 found this helpful

The only thing I can add to all the suggestions is instead of dredging in flour, I use Bisquick.

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