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Best Shoe Glue for Repair or Redesign

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What type of glue can you use on shoes that is strong enough to repair them? I would also like to glue on extra material or leather to redesign the shoe.

By Barbara

Recent Answers

Here are the recent answer to this question.

By Holly [350]08/12/2011

If you are just adding decorations, try Gorilla Glue. If you expect it to withstand pressure when walking (like re-attaching a strap), it might work - might not, but it functions nicely for the former.

By Sally Pifer [4]08/12/2011

Try a product called Shoe Goo.

By Marjorie C. Woodworth [82]08/11/2011

Barges Glue can be found at shoe repair stores
Barges glue should be used if you are gluing leather to leather. If you are gluing rubber to leather use Barges or 3M 80 which is a spray adhesive.

Contact Adhesives - Barges Glue
When an adhesive is a contact this means it adheres to itself, taking along what ever it is attached to. To use a contact adhesive you simply apply even coats of the adhesive to each material you wish to adhere, allow it to dry, and stick them together. Contact adhesives are ideal when it is awkward to clamp, or when you have large surface area. Some Glues can be used as contact adhesives or as straight application, see Spray Adhesives. **

Tips on using a contact adhesive:
* If the material you are bonding is porous, apply two coats of adhesive, allowing it to dry in between.
* Even if the instructions say you may wait up to 24 hours before bonding, if your environment is dusty (which most are), this will reduce the strength of your bond. It is best to bond materials within two hours of applying the adhesive.
* The most common mistake that people make with a contact adhesive, is to attempt to bond the materials too soon. The thicker the layer of adhesive, the longer it will take to dry. So even if the instruction say it is ready for bonding in ten minutes, this is better tested by touching the adhesive. If it does not come off on your finger, then it is dry enough to bond.
* The more even your application of contact adhesive, the more even your drying time, and the stronger your bond. For an even coat, use a small paint roller. If you are using a solvent free adhesive, this will wash up in soap and water. For solvent based adhesive, it is easier and less harmful on the environment to throw the roller out after use, than to use enough of the appropriate solvent to clean your roller. Also, a foam brush gives a fairly even coat as well.

* Spray Adhesives
Spray adhesives are great for providing a smooth even adherence, but they are very toxic, and expensive. Here are some tips for using a spray adhesive.

* Spray adhesives can be used by applying to the heavier of the two materials you are attaching, and placing the lighter material on to the other before the glue has dried. This is fast, but if you are attaching a large area it can be difficult.
* You can also use a spray adhesive by applying to both materials you are attaching, allowing them to dry to the touch, and then attaching them together. This technique is called "contact adherence".
* When using a spray adhesive as a "contact adherent" the two materials bond instantly on contact. It is difficult, if not impossible, to break the bond once the materials have made contact.
* Unwanted wrinkles can be prevented by folding the top material in half or quarters and applying in manageable amounts. Make sure the material is positioned accurately before you fold it in half.
* If you do get a wrinkle, you can soften the glue with a hair dryer, and carefully rub the wrinkle towards the edge.
* If you are using a spray adhesive on a small area, you may need to mask off this area to prevent over spray. Brown paper bags work well as a masking, or of course, masking tape!

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