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Pinesol As A Cat Pee Deterrent

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I had a problem with our cats wetting in places other than their litter box. I found out if I wash the floor with PineSol they would stay away from that spot. They soon went back to the box where they were suppose to be using.

By Connie

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By Donna12/16/2013

Pinesol is extremely poisonous to cats and dogs, I found this out first hand. My cats were vomiting and sick, my dogs were losing their fur. I read how dangerous pine products are for animals. There are better options. I use vinegar to clean my floors. Green soap is also an option. If all urine odor has been removed from carpet, simple fabric softener sheets on the area they want to frequent will keep them away.

By Robyn [348]06/03/2013

Cats will avoid huge smells at all costs. This is from trying to hide their presence in the desert all those years ago..from what i have read. It is their job to cover their identity from others who would make a meal out of them.

I did read that shelters and rescues have pretty much banned lysol and pinesol. They contain phenol and that is toxic to animals. Take note that spraying phenolic compoundds such as lysol is just as bad as using pine sol.

I found this link:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/purr ... ol-can-be-fatal-to-cats/144540547412

I actually used to use lysol to spray the litter boxes but now I just use vinegar. I use either kind of vinegar. Vinegar is a disinfectant also.

By Lizzyanny [9]06/01/2013

I have only once seen a person exposed to the fumes caused by ammonia and bleach. They were hospitalized for 3 days and very sick. Well beyond watery eyes and a cough. Clearly it is a dangerous combination. Probably not as dangerous as arrogant stupidity, but close.

By VJ11/14/2010

The ingredients in Pine Sol are sodium, petroleum sulfate and isopropanol. Phenol has nothing to do with it's name. SOL is an abbreviation for Solution. Pine SOLution as well a catchy name for Pine Oil. I would recommend that people read the directions before using this product. Keep away from children and this would also mean your pets. Common sense. Never let pets and children around any toxic chemical. Let it dry before allowing them to roam on treated areas. Dilute with more water if you are extremely concerned. Use wisdom!

By eve [16]07/22/2010

I've used vinegar, straight, not diluted. It will smell for a littel while but will disapear so you can't smell it but they can. If you use ammonia, it will attrack them back to the spot. Use vinegar, it's safe and helps elimnate odor from the room while it's at it.

By Leslie Anne Davey (Guest Post)03/04/2008

On Sunday, my 'stupid' dog took a 'sip' of water & pinesol. I say 'stupid', because out of the corner of my eye, I saw him do it and said 'oh, you 'stupid' dog, I hope that tastes good'. About an hour later, he was shaking his head and I thought he had something in his ear, which I forgot to look at, then when I called him, he came towards me with his tongue hanging out the side of his mouth (not normal for this dog), and it was bright red. I thought he had cut it or something, but it was just red. At 7ish PM Sunday night, he had a full blown grand mal seizure, which lasted 7-10 minutes and then he was 'out of it and not knowing me' for about 10 to 14 minutes. This is a breed that is known to have epilepsy and so you do everything possible to avoid that in your pedigrees. I did, but more importantly, this dog is going 6 in May of '08 and has never been sick a day in his life and epilepsy usually takes form before the dog is 5.

They always always say something happens for a reason.....on the Monday, I got a whiff of the pinesol smelling mop, and it triggered the incident of him getting a mouthful. I did a Google search for pine sol seizures, and landed on this website and others which clearly specify that pinesol can cause seizures in dogs.

Does anyone else have more information? I took him to my clinic for an evaluation and am having urine tested as I read somewhere that phenol can be traced 1-2 days in the urine of an affected dog. Any insight would be greatly appreciated as this dog is my late husband's dog and one of the links I have to him some 3 years later. Thanks in advance....cheerfully (but not so)....lad

Private responses if you wish to s ett er s @ sha w. c a

By Leslie Anne Davey (Guest Post)03/04/2008

On Sunday, my 'stupid' dog took a 'sip' of water & pinesol. I say 'stupid', because out of the corner of my eye, I saw him do it and said 'oh, you 'stupid' dog, I hope that tastes good'. About an hour later, he was shaking his head and I thought he had something in his ear, which I forgot to look at, then when I called him, he came towards me with his tongue hanging out the side of his mouth (not normal for this dog), and it was bright red. I thought he had cut it or something, but it was just red. At 7ish PM Sunday night, he had a full blown grand mal seizure, which lasted 7-10 minutes and then he was 'out of it and not knowing me' for about 10 to 14 minutes. This is a breed that is known to have epilepsy and so you do everything possible to avoid that in your pedigrees. I did, but more importantly, this dog is going 6 in May of '08 and has never been sick a day in his life and epilepsy usually takes form before the dog is 5.

They always always say something happens for a reason.....on the Monday, I got a whiff of the pinesol smelling mop, and it triggered the incident of him getting a mouthful. I did a Google search for pine sol seizures, and landed on this website and others which clearly specify that pinesol can cause seizures in dogs.

Does anyone else have more information? I took him to my clinic for an evaluation and am having urine tested as I read somewhere that phenol can be traced 1-2 days in the urine of an affected dog. Any insight would be greatly appreciated as this dog is my late husband's dog and one of the links I have to him some 3 years later. Thanks in advance....cheerfully (but not so)....lad

Private responses if you wish to s ett er s @ sha w. c a

By Leslie Anne Davey (Guest Post)03/04/2008

On Sunday, my 'stupid' dog took a 'sip' of water & pinesol. I say 'stupid', because out of the corner of my eye, I saw him do it and said 'oh, you 'stupid' dog, I hope that tastes good'. About an hour later, he was shaking his head and I thought he had something in his ear, which I forgot to look at, then when I called him, he came towards me with his tongue hanging out the side of his mouth (not normal for this dog), and it was bright red. I thought he had cut it or something, but it was just red. At 7ish PM Sunday night, he had a full blown grand mal seizure, which lasted 7-10 minutes and then he was 'out of it and not knowing me' for about 10 to 14 minutes. This is a breed that is known to have epilepsy and so you do everything possible to avoid that in your pedigrees. I did, but more importantly, this dog is going 6 in May of '08 and has never been sick a day in his life and epilepsy usually takes form before the dog is 5.

They always always say something happens for a reason.....on the Monday, I got a whiff of the pinesol smelling mop, and it triggered the incident of him getting a mouthful. I did a Google search for pine sol seizures, and landed on this website and others which clearly specify that pinesol can cause seizures in dogs.

Does anyone else have more information? I took him to my clinic for an evaluation and am having urine tested as I read somewhere that phenol can be traced 1-2 days in the urine of an affected dog. Any insight would be greatly appreciated as this dog is my late husband's dog and one of the links I have to him some 3 years later. Thanks in advance....cheerfully (but not so)....lad

Private responses if you wish to s ett er s @ sha w. c a

By mike (Guest Post)01/10/2008

First off, if the pinesol works, use it. Second, to the person that said mixing bleach with ammonia, the fumes will kill you? Hardly. it will make you cough and you will get runny eyes. It's prolonged exposure that will kill you. I don't know about you, but I don't know any people that will willingly sit while coughing and they can't see.

As for the pinesol, again, if it works. I don't see how buying simple green, mixing with water, diluting again, having a super detailed strict guidelines house is going to be practical. Maybe if I didn't have a job and could devote all my time to conquering those pesky germs.

Side note, germs are what keep us humans alive. try eating without your mouth/digestive system sometime, let me know how it works out.

Editor's Note: Mixing bleach and ammonia is not a good thing. Here's information about it in a .pdf file:

http://www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/oehas/HSEES/chlorinebleachfactsheet-2005.pdf

By Eric (Guest Post)04/03/2007

In reply to the Post By doe

It is the phenol in pine-sol not pine from pine trees as you are thinking. I found out today the nastiness of pine sol and pets when my dog started having seizures. He had one before, about eight months ago. Both episodes were when I was mopping the floor with pine sol.

By doe (Guest Post)02/25/2007

I call BS. Cat's and pine oil have been living on the same planet for thousands of years and cats aren't dropping dead. I've seen cats drinking water from under the christmas tree for all my life. One of our cats climbs the tree and eats the needles.

If Pinesol keeps the cat from peeing on the floor, use it!!!!

By PurrEver RAnch (Guest Post)03/03/2006

PINE SOL can be LETHAL to felines. Anything ending in "sol" contains phenol which can cause instant liver damage to a cat. That is why animal shelters & sanctuaries ban these products. If you have cats, please don't use pine solo lysol or you both might be SOL.
Rita Wood, Founder
PurrEver Ranch
www.purreveranch.org

By Lorrie Cole (Guest Post)03/17/2005

can you use pine sol on a rug?

By Helen Melvin02/24/2005

I'm not customarily a "me too" poster, but I can't emphasize how important it is to GET RID OF THE PINE-SOL. I do not use it in my three-cat household because it is LETHAL to cats!

I use two products in my home: Simple Green and Simple Solution. Simple Green (see http://consumer.simplegreen.com/cons_prod_ori.php) is a relatively non-toxic cleaner that has replaced nearly all my other cleaners. Simple Solution is an enzyme-based urine odor remover (see http://www.bramton.com/products_us/stain&odor.htm). I buy Simple Green in a gallon container (lasts forever, as it's a concentrate) at Sam's Club, and Simple Solution (also in a gallon container of concentrate) at a local farm and pet supply store. Both can be ordered over the Web if you can't find them locally. Simple Solution will even remove urine odor from mattresses and furniture. I bought a package of empty heavy-duty spray bottles at Sam's to dispense the diluted cleaners.

I mix 1 part Simple Green, 1 part Simple Solution, and 8 parts water in a spray bottle. I use this to clean the floor where the cat has urinated. Even though both products are considered non-toxic, I rinse the area afterwards just to be safe. One of my cats has kidney disease and I am careful to avoid exposing him to any chemicals, even those considered non-toxic.

Both products are inexpensive when purchased in gallon containers; I only have to buy them every year or so, as when diluted with water they make gallons of solution. Smaller containers of these products are available, but they work out a bit more expensive per ounce. If you don't mind the expense, the Simple Solution folks make a whole range of cleaners/deodorizers for different surfaces, including disposable wipes and specialty sprays.

The only other household cleaner I use is bleach when I need a disinfectant or heavy-duty stain remover, and I'm careful to dilute that well (1 part bleach, 9 parts water) and rinse up any residue. The Simple Green folks also make their own antibacterial surface cleaner; I use bleach because it costs less. Both the Simple Green and Simple Solution manufacturers offer a large line of cleaning products that are safe to use around pets, but I personally make it a rule to rinse after using any cleaner.

It goes without saying, but don't mix bleach with any cleaner containing ammonia, or the fumes could kill you. It's safest never to mix any cleaners, though the Simple Green and Simple Solution together are OK. Both highly recommended for households with pets or toddlers.

By kate [3]01/23/2005

ive used windex. it not only cleans the spot but she hates to even get near the smell, let along get it on her paws...she stays very far from the area!

By Cher01/14/2005

Karen is correct. Pinesol is HIGHLY TOXIC and will kill your cats. Please do not ever use that.They will get it on their paws and lick it when cleaning themselves. My friend was mopping her floor and the exact thing happened (she thought her floor was dry). It was immediately fatal. I use all non-toxic cleaning products because you just never know. I would suggest, vinegar in your situation. Read the labels - common sense should tell you. If your child got into the bottle obviously she would be taken to the hospital, your pets are the same way.

By Karen (Guest Post)01/12/2005

Be careful using Pinesol around your cats - the pine oil is toxic to cats.

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