Supporting Tomato Plants

When planting tomato plants in a garden - place hog panel 3 feet tall down the length of the row(s). Plant tomato plants in front of each side of the panel - as they begin grow start to tie them to the panel with cut up nylon hose. It holds the plant up and doesn't damage the plant if you tie it securely enough - but not too tight. Continue to tie it up as it grows.

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Keep the row(s) weeded - whatever your preference is. You can walk through and pick off tomatoes, without having to pick up plants - for the tomato beneath, and you can see the worms easier!

By Chaingang from N Manchester, IN

March 18, 20060 found this helpful

What is a hog panel?

Carole in MD

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March 19, 20060 found this helpful

What is a hog panel and any pictures??????

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March 20, 20060 found this helpful

I grew up on a farm so I knew immediately what a "hog panel" is. I've been off the farm for many years so my description may not be totally accurate as far as size and gauge....but I can help describe it. It is a "panel" made up of rigid wire. I believe there are different sizes, especially in length. They are 3 or 4 feet high and possibly 10 and 12 feet long. The wire is about the diameter of a drinking straw. The entire panel is quite rigid but does have some flex in it. The wires form a grid on the entire panel. A "cattle" panel will have the wires spaced farther apart, perhaps 8 inch by 12 inch rectangles covering the whole panel. A "hog" panel will have the wires forming smaller rectangles on the bottom edge........so the little piggy cannot get through! These panels are very useful on the farm. They are used for temporary (or permanent!) fences....just attach to a post. They are great to carry in front of you to "herd",or force, contrary small animals to move to a new pen or place. They're great for the garden.

I used two to put a roof over one end of my dog kennel. My chain-link kennel is 8 foot wide. I took a 10 foot "cattle panel" and forced the ends inside the top edge of my dog kennel fence. Obviously the panel had to "bow" upward to fit! I fastened the panels securely to the top of my fence then fastened a silver tarp over that! My sweet Australian shepherd, Drover, has protection from the sun and the rain, and since it bows upward water can't collect on top, it runs off.

You can buy these panels at farm supply stores. If you check online they may possibly be called "livestock panels" and could possibly be listed under "fencing". If you plan to buy these you'll want a pickup truck to haul them. They won't fit in your car trunk or SUV (they don't bend THAT much!)

Hope this helps you "picture" a hog panel :>) !!

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April 9, 20060 found this helpful

First a note to Chaingang from N Manchester, Indiana...I lived in Silver Lake, IN and worked in N. Manchester for several years, before I moved to KS and now am in MO....I find it nice to read something from a fellow Hoosier. ;) To answer several questions, a hog panel is a type of fencing, or a gate. Do a search on google and type in hog panel. Happy Gardening.

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July 10, 20080 found this helpful

I like to use 6 foot wooden stakes. I use three per plant and angle them out at the top.

I drive them about 7 inches into the ground and run strings around the outside for support.

Works GREAT!

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