Filling Out a Money Order?

Can a money order be filled out to two parties on the payee line
For example:
James Smith or Gemi Smith

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December 28, 20190 found this helpful
Best Answer

Money orders are the same as checks or even cash. This should be fine to fill it out this way. Just in case contact the bank first before doing this.

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January 1, 20200 found this helpful
Best Answer

You should be very careful when putting 2 names on a money order as the USPS does not always go by the same rules as the banking world.

As a general rule it has always been accepted that 2 names on a money order or check would have to be signed by both parties unless there is an 'or' placed between the names.
So this would mean that 2 names (one after the other) would require both parties to be present with proper ID to cash the money order or check.

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Some banks will accept for deposit if both parties signed without both parties being present but the rules for this are numerous so always check with your bank before depositing something like this.

I worked in management in the postal service for over 26 years and this one subject came up many, many times as postal employees (even managers) cannot know/remember all the rules especially on subjects they may only encounter once every 2-3 years.

You do not say if you are buying the money order but if this is the case then be sure you know how to place the names on the payee line.
Two names without 'or' between the names requires both parties to be present to cash it either at the post office or a bank. This also applies if there is 'and' between the names.

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Be aware that if there is an 'or' between the names the party that cashes the money order/check does not have to 'notify' the other party about cashing the item nor share the money....

Here is the official USPS rules:

14.3.5 More Than One Payee

A money order addressed to more than one payee is paid to either payee if the conjunction "or" is used to connect the payees. If no conjunction is used, then all listed payees must sign the money order in the presence of the accepting employee and provide photo-bearing identifications.

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January 1, 20200 found this helpful

Sorry - I meant to add:

The Postal Service's rule differs from the UCC rule when it comes to the "ambiguous" rule. The UCC says that the absence of a conjunction means the payees are alternative (one may negotiate).

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The USPS manual says that the lack of a conjunction means the payees are not alternative payees (i.e., all payees must sign to negotiate).

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December 28, 20190 found this helpful

Yes. There is no reason why not.

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December 29, 20190 found this helpful

Yes you can both sign!

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Anonymous
January 3, 20200 found this helpful

Thanks for the insight!!
Just wanted to make sure before I filled it out

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