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Receiving Social Security Survivor Benefits

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November 16, 2017

My dad passed away when I was 14 years old. I didn't know of a thing called Survivor's benefits. I am now 33. Is it too late to get Survivor's benefits and could I receive back pay for it?

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November 16, 20170 found this helpful
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Who took care of you when you were 14? You don't say, but I am assuming it was your mother. At any rate, that person probably filed for your survivor's benefits since you were a minor at the time. Because you were a minor, that money would not have come directly to you.

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It would have gone to your guardian on your behalf to be used to take care of you. That would mean your shelter, food, clothes, etc. Those benefits would have stopped when you turned 18 (or 19 if you were still in high school at that age). You would not be able to collect now.

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March 4, 2015

My daughter's father died and she receives death benefits. I was wondering if she will still receive them if my new husband adopts her?

By Cyndie from Boone, IA

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March 6, 20150 found this helpful
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Get correct answers at your Social Security office. Very easy to do but may entail a short/long wait - sometimes you can call and make an appointment but still may have a "wait".

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I believe that if your daughter is adopted by your present husband her legal status will change and she will no longer be eligible for benefits from her "former/biological" father.

Rules change in all government services so please get your answers from the SS office so you can make an informed choice as to whether this is a good idea. I believe you really need to think about why/reasons you want to do this. Maybe discuss this with a representative of the family services division in your city as there may be other ways to accomplish your "reasons".

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March 22, 20150 found this helpful
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If you are recieving survivor benefits on behalf of a child and your child is adopted by your new husband, your child will continue to be illegible for the same benefits. You'll just need to update their record with the SSA.

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I have three daughters, whose father passed away. We recieved survivors benefits. I remarried and my current husband legally adopted my daughters. I notified the SSA, we changed their names on record, and we continued to receive benefits until they all turned 18. Hope this helps!

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February 27, 2014

My father passed away when I was in the fourth grade. I'm just now graduating high school and am about to turn 18. I was receiving Social Security, he was also disabled when he died. Can I still receive it for college?

By Caleb from Chickasha, OK

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February 27, 20140 found this helpful
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You'll have to get proof of paternity through family court to get the father's name on the birth certificate. I'm going through it now even though my son's grandmother called right after his father died and they said to just come in.

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I don't need anything. Good thing when I got his birth certificate without his father's name, I called and figured out how to get it on there or I'd be waiting longer than I already have to. I have a court date next month then I have to make another SS appointment once I have the proof.

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February 28, 20140 found this helpful
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Hi - only the SS office can answer your question.
Be sure to take yours and your dad's SS numbers, as well as a copy of his death certificate.

You may not receive the same benefits but you may be able to get some money for college. Be sure to check with your school's counselor for the kinds of help you may be eligible for.

Good luck and please stay in college if you can.

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January 20, 2014

My father died 3 years ago of cancer at a young age. Am I able to get his Social Security benefits? I am a single mom of two and I am having a hard time making ends meet. This would help me greatly.

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By Julia

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January 30, 20140 found this helpful
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Survivor's benefits are for spouses and children under the age of 18. If you are 16 and unmarried, you may be able to draw. Check with your local office.

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February 27, 2018

I have been my mother's caregiver for 6 years. She passed away last week. I was told that I could receive some of her Social Security benefits, if I were her caregiver. Does anyone know the answer to this question?

Thanks.

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I have a 16 year old son who receives survivor benefits. He is staying with his grandpa while going to school. I send him money every month to live on.

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I have been saving money in his savings account since he has been gone, can he sue me for that?

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February 5, 20170 found this helpful
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SS is supposed to go to the person who is raising the child, for the care of that child. If you are not spending it all for his upkeep, then you are in in trouble. But, if you are spending some on his insurance, some to send to him, some for his school expenses. If you are going to be giving him what is in the savings, you are probably ok. They will ask if he is getting proper food, clothing and such provided where he is living. If he isn't, and you are using the money to pay your expenses, they you are in violation.

My friend received money for her daughter, yet her daughter lived with her grandma for school, so that she could be in a better school district (she had been bullied at her local school, so they moved her). She continued to get her daughters check. However, with the money from that check, she paid for all her daughters school expenses, health insurance, school lunches, clothing....her Grandma had no expenses for housing her as the mom was still providing all that-from her ss check. She told the ss office what was going on and due to the fact she could account for every cent of the money and the fact there was a police report of the bullying, they were fine with it.

If

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March 31, 2016

I was receiving Social Security benefits as a survivor after my father passed away. I recently turned 18 in March. I did not receive anything from work. Should I have received something for the month of March and do I get a lump sum?

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May 14, 2014

Could this be fraud or is the law being bent? My husband was previously married and had a child from that marriage. He and I were married a short time after his divorce and had children of our own. His ex did not want their child to know about his dad and had him adopted by another man, someone who had been part of his life the whole time.

My husband, then died 7 months after it was finalized. Because my husband relinquished his rights and all financial obligations, how are they able to claim survivors benifets if the law clearly states my husband had to be the legal guardian of his child and was not?

By Confused -N

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May 14, 20140 found this helpful
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Call your local Social Security Office and talk to them. They are the only ones that know the correct answer. Even if this is correct, it doesn't affect the amount your kids will be getting.

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July 9, 2013

My ex and I were married for over 34 years. Can I get his Social Security although we were not married when he passed away?

By M. T

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July 11, 20130 found this helpful
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I am pretty sure anyone can collect on an ex -dead or alive - if they were married for at least 10 years - - if you are over the age of 65. Social Security has a wonderful website.

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March 22, 2013

How do I go about drawing Social Security for my child when his father died two months before he was born in 2007 and now here it is 2013?

By Ashley L.

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March 24, 20130 found this helpful
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Married or not you need to contact your local Social Security office. They will help you feel out all the paperwork. You need to take Social Security cards and birth certificates for both of you. It would also be very helpful to take the deceased fathers death certificate. You may have to allow a DNA test between child and a living relative of the father. Someone told me married or not you have to do a DNA, but I am not sure on that rumor. Good Luck and I hope this will help!

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December 2, 2012

My son's father recently passed. We were not together and even though he didn't sign the birth certificate and wouldn't give his DNA for child support he was put down as the father and was ordered to pay child support, since he wouldn't fight it. My son is 4 years old. Will he receive a check off his father?

By Gina G

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December 4, 20120 found this helpful
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Receiving Social Security death benefits for your child is federal and not state ordered. Take a copy of the child support order to your local Social Security office and they will help you. They will require you to fill out an application and supply other documents as well but initially showing them the court order should get the ball rolling.

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December 13, 2017

My boyfriend's mother passed away when he was 15 and he is now 22. He was receiving Social Security checks that were addressed to him from the time he was 15-18. He moved out of his father's home (who was not married to his mother at the time of her death) last year, and he is now refusing Josh (my boyfriend) the remaining money from his Social Security checks claiming that they are his even though the checks were made out to Josh.

We were told that after the child of the deceased turned 18, the surviving parent is required to return any leftover Social Security money to the Social Security department and then the Social Security office writes Josh a check for that amount, but that never happened. Who is entitled to the money after he turned 18 and how can he prove it if it's his? (Also, his brother who is 13 years younger than him is currently still receiving benefits of the same kind, so that's why we are so sure that the money is Josh's. His grandparents are raising his brother and have assured Josh that the money is going to what his brother needs and when he is 18 that he will be able to keep whatever is leftover.)

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December 14, 20170 found this helpful
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Since the cheques are made out to josh they are his cheques what your boyfriends mother is doing is fraud.

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December 14, 20170 found this helpful
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Report this to Social Security immediately. You can also contact the Legal Aid Society. You will get a lawyer to represent you for free.

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April 18, 2017

My son receives Beneficiary Social Security from my husband's and my work record. He is 18, but graduates on May 26th. My question is will he receive a check in June for May or will his check in May for the month of April be his last one? I am trying to budget for June so any information will be greatly appreciated. I know when my hubby passed away in December he wasn't due a check in January because he didn't live all of December. So I am figuring the same will be true with my son graduating near the end of the month that he will not be due a check in June which covers May.

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October 21, 2015

My son and I receive Social Security. He is 16 now; will he receive my 700 as well?

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October 21, 20150 found this helpful
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Only the Social Security Administration can answer your question.

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October 22, 20150 found this helpful
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There is too little information in your question for anyone to attempt to give an answer.

But, no matter what answer was/is given, only the SS office can answer your questions correctly.

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February 23, 2014

My niece lost her mother (my twin sister) 10 years ago, and we recently found out her biological father passed away 4months ago. I have guardianship of her now, and she is 15 years old. Can she receive benefits from her biological father as well or can she receive benefits in place of the amount she currently is getting from her mom's passing?

By Rachelle

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February 23, 20140 found this helpful
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Call your local Social Security Office and talk to them. They are the only people that will know the correct answer.

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February 25, 20140 found this helpful
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redhatterb is absolutely correct - the Social Security office is the only place that can give you the correct answer.

I can tell you this much from experience - You should be able to chose which person to receive benefits from so you should be able to choose the highest benefit. It will go smoother if you have their social security numbers.

You will only receive benefits from one person.

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October 13, 2017

Can my ex-husband's girlfriend claim survivor benefits?

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October 18, 20170 found this helpful
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If they were living together, and your State recognizes common law marriage then yes. If your State does not then no. Or if they have ever lived together in a State that does recognize common law marriage then yes.

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October 11, 2017

First some background. I was curios about who should have been receiving my survivor benefits. My mom died when I was 2, I'm 19 now, and was receiving survivors benefits every month. I was eligible to receive them for a few months after I turned 18, due to the fact that I was still in high school. My father has also saved up some money for me to go to college. I understand that the checks go to my father to support me, and not me directly. My 2 questions are: 1. The few checks that were sent to us after I turned 18, were made out to me. Should those checks have been going to me directly instead of to him, since I was no longer a minor? 2. The money he saved up for college, I've decided to go to community college, and through fafsa and grants, I won't have to pay anything, therefore making that "college fund" money "worthless". Now that I'm 19 and there is no need to spend money on college, am I entitled to that money that was saved up and is sitting in one of his accounts? Thank you for taking the time to answer.

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October 11, 20170 found this helpful
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Well my son went through something similar with Social Security and his Grandfather. He was living with his Gpa, and his Gpa was the payee for his benefits just like you and your dad. Once my son turned 18 he also kept getting his benefits because of high school. My son did not have a bank account and his benefits were always direct deposited into his Gpas account. Once he turned 18 the social security office would no longer deposit it into his Gpas account because the "Pay to the order of" section had changed to it only being made out to my son instead of both of their names on the check. Since my son did not have a bank account and his Gpas name was no longer on the check they mailed a paper check for several months and kept telling him that it was not their policy to mail paper checks any longer and he needed to set up a direct deposit account. He never did they just kept mailing paper checks until his benefits stopped. So to answer your first question, yes technically since you are no longer a minor the benefits you received would of been paid directly to you had you set it up that way. Now as far as the college money your dad has been saving for you your entire life no mam I dont think you are entitled to it simply because your going to be going to a cheaper college and you will be receiving financial aid. College still costs money outside of what Fafsa will cover. Your dad did not save that money your entire life just to take it and spend it on whatever just because college ended up being cheaper than he would of thought. Also, he did not save it to watch you dwindle through it on meaningless things. He saved it ultimately so he would not have to worry about your future if he was to not be here one day. If it got spent on college that assures him you will be educated and able to get a job and he will know you will be OK. If it stays in an account he probably rests easier knowing you will have something to live off of if he for some reason wont be here. Im just speaking as a parent of a 19 year old, but you never know he might surprise you and get you a car or let you use it as a down payment on your first home. He loves you, he has your best interest at heart, dont knit pick over pennies. Im sure there were times it wasn't easy being a single dad and there were probably times he wondered if y'all would be OK financially and Im sure he worked very hard making sure y'all had everything you needed. Good luck in college, and Good luck with your dad.

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October 5, 2017

My boyfriend died two years ago, and today I was told I could get an income check for my daughter. That would be great to help pay for her school. Now my question is, he wasn't her biological father, but was on her birth certificate. He was aware he wasn't her biological father. He signed the papers willingly and raised her for the first year before he died. Am I able to collect if he's not biological? Her biological dad is barely in the picture. Can someone explain this to me?

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October 6, 20170 found this helpful
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If he is stated as being the father on the birth certificate then legally he is going to be presumed as the father. The biological father would have to take you to court and submit dna for paternity to be questioned at this point. My daughter received survivor benefits, her father died when she was 2 months old and we were unmarried. He was listed on her birth certificate but that's all the proof I had. I would apply as soon as possible they may even pay benefits going all the way back to the month he passed away they did with ours. I wouldn't even mention the biological father because legally he would have to establish paternity in a court so that the court could make him financially responsible, as of now the financial responsible parents are you and sadly her dad who passed away that's how it's registered to the state according to her birth certificate. That is what survivor benefits are for. He paid in to social security and it was his intentions to raise and be financially responsible for your daughter it's only right that after his death she be able to still be financially stable, and that's alot harder for 1 parent then 2. Best of luck

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April 19, 2015

My brother is disabled and doesn't get a lot from a disability check of $740 monthly. He would not be able to live on it if something were to happen to my mother. If my mother were to die, can my brother collect her SS or survivor benefits? They live together now; my father is deceased.

By Denise

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April 19, 20150 found this helpful
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Your family should be getting your brother on a waiting list for a rent subsidized apartment. The rent for them runs roughly 30% of a person's income. Most apartments have a good portion of the utilities included in the rent. Also he should qualify for some food stamps.

Has he had any training on how to live independently? If not, he should be receiving some of that. He should know how to shop, do laundry, dishes, a little cooking. Is he working part time, which is something that he should be doing too, he should have a case manager to help him find a job. I have a 46 year old mentally handicapped daughter that lives with me and with our income combined, which both are Social Security, we get rent assistance for our apartment and when I am gone the rent assistance will automatically roll over to her. She has known how to do the laundry for about 20 years, it was a learning process because I knew someday she would have to do it on her own. She also knows how to shop for groceries and how to ask a store employee for help if she needs it. I have taught her how to load the dishwasher, and being she will be on her own in the near future, because I have a new health problem that will make it so that she has to become independent quite soon.

She also has a case managers that when I am gone they will help her pay bills, help her shop, etc. Being my health has taken a turn for the worse, I am also looking at different types of frozen foods that can be heated in the microwave so she won't have to mess with the stove. She has learned how to heat cheeseburger sliders that are in the frozen food department, you can buy french fries that can be heated in the microwave, single serve size pizzas that can be done in the oven or microwave, there is also something called scramblers that are scrambled eggs with diced bacon on some type of a crust.

You can buy small containers of potato salad in deli departments, franks can be heated in the microwave. There is a lot your brother is going to have to know, unless you are planning on taking him in. I don't know what kind of training he has had, but I get the idea from your complaint that he hasn't had a lot of training. My daughter is capable of living alone with the help of her case managers.

As far as help from Social Security goes, if your parents worked enough to draw Social Security when they die, your brother should receive a certain percentage in Survivor's Benefits. I don't know exactly how that is figured, I am going to have to call our SS Office and talk to them about that matter too. I do know the parents have to work a certain period of time in order to qualify.

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March 28, 2013

My sister and I were 12 and 17, when our father passed away. That was 16 years ago. He was 41 years old at the time. I'm not sure when he became a US citizen, but it must of been at least 5 years prior to his death. My question is how can I find out if we are now at this day and age eligible to receive his survival benefits if any and if these even apply?

By Liz N.

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March 30, 20130 found this helpful
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If you were 12 and 17 when he died, and that was 16 years ago, I don't believe you are eligible for anything. Up to age 18, or older if to are still a student. That ship has sailed long ago. www.socialsecurity.gov is where I answer all my own questions.

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April 14, 2018

My son passed away at 25 years old. He was employed from the age of 16. What happens to all the Social Security that he paid? He never married and has no kids. Am I entitled to it as his parent?

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