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Stucco or Paint?

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My home's stucco is in need of repair. I've heard you should not paint over stucco, but I know some folks who have done just that. Just wondering if the reason for not painting over stucco is due to moisture getting in between the new paint and the underlying stucco. And, is there any newer type exterior paint these days that would work well over stucco (after repairing the stucco cracks, of course)? I find it hard to believe with the technology these days, that someone has not figured out a way to paint over stucco (must less expensive, and can be changed easier). Thanks for any suggestions.

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June 23, 20040 found this helpful

We live in Florida, and many homes here happen to have stucco on their exterior walls. When you put regular housepaint over stucco, you have two problems: #1 the stucco soaks up a lot of paint, and you will need to do several extra coats in order to get complete coverage, and #2 moisture. We have insane humidity issues here, and water can get trapped in the stucco and cause bubbles in the exterior finish or worse, mold problems! Mold damage can make humans sick, and it can kill pets. The only way to repair/eliminate major mold problems is to completely rebuild the affected area, and remove all of the contaminated structure.

One of our neighbors used a special mold-inhibiting sealer before painting over the stucco finish in his master bathroom (another high-humidity area) and he said that the results were great. I'm not sure if this would work on an exterior wall, because it requires that the stucco be completely dry, but if you live in an area that doesn't get much rain in the summer it may be worth a try.

Call your local paint store/Home Depot/Lowe's and see if they can recommend a quality primer that you can use to seal the moisture out of your stucco. It's worth the extra time and $, since it may prevent major problems in the future. (cost of 10 gallons of sealer = $100 or less, cost of replacing an entire exterior wall due to mold growth = several thousand $$.)

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By guest client (Guest Post)
June 24, 20040 found this helpful

My parents house is located in South Texas. It is also stucco. My dad learned long ago to make a soup from cactus (boiled cactus & water strained) and mix that with the paint. It worked 30 years ago and last year, when he had the house painted, he had to tell the painters how to make it. You can't put it on with a regular roller. A Brush, mop type and possibly a sprayer might work. If you are doing it yourself, try a small area in the back that few people will see.

It worked for my family.

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 18, 20040 found this helpful

My parents owned a stucco home which I inherited. Purchase exterior paint with Tricoplex. It's an additive especially for stucco. It allows the paints to flex with changes in temperatures.

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By guest (Guest Post)
December 29, 20051 found this helpful

I'm an Architect in Houston. You should use an elastomeric paint. We use this on new stucco as well. It stretches to hide any hairline cracks that form. It also keeps moisture out.

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By guest (Guest Post)
February 1, 20060 found this helpful

We have a house in chicago with Stucco. We recently had it painted and i guess they used the wrong type of paint. It keep craking and peeling off. Now the painters are saying to wait till it all falls off again to repaint it. Is there a quicker and safer way to take off paint of stucco. And does anyone know what was done wrong that caused the all the paint to crack and fall off? Please let me know thanks

Nirav

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June 28, 20160 found this helpful

YOu can power wash your paint, if you rent a machine form Homedopt and you can remove over 800 sf of paint a day if they are easily accessible from ground.

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 6, 20060 found this helpful

Where can I buy Tricoplex?

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 9, 20060 found this helpful

I have a question. I have a cinderblock wall that has an un-even stucco coating. Then I painted it. NOW, I would like to re-stucco it and make it smooth. Can I stucco over latex paint???

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By guest (Guest Post)
March 14, 20070 found this helpful

I want to stucco the exterior of my house, the plaster I have now is rouge but it has paint on it, could I stucco over it?

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By guest (Guest Post)
March 5, 20080 found this helpful

You should NEVER PAINT stucco! As someone already mentioned, moisture gets between the paint on the stucco and the moisture proof paper that is attached to your structure's studs. If mold forms in there, it can crawl up the moisture barrier and into your house. There are many contractors in this country who are not educated in this area and will still tell you its okay, because they have seen it all of their lives. There is a chance that you will never have a moisture/mold problem if you paint stucco, but is it worth that chance? Stucco is suppose to breath.

If your stucco touches dirt at the bottom of your exterior wall and that dirt gets wet when it rains or for any other reason. The moisture will crawl up the stucco that is under the ground where there is no paint and into the area where it gets trapped between the paint and the moisture barrier. Then when that wall heats up in the summer and the moisture expands, it will then push the paint off the stucco. Thus peeling your paint or brewing mold. Stucco breaths and the moisture barrier keeps out the moisture.

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September 6, 20160 found this helpful

Contact Romabio -- they make lime wash paint and solid opaque paint that is made for painting brick and stucco. It is not a latex paint and allows the masonry to breathe. Trust me... took me months to find them and you'll never hear about all this on the paint blogs. The lime wash paint is very thin and milky so a little goes a long way v. latex paint that soaks into stucco like a sponge. Renee

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By guest (Guest Post)
April 8, 20080 found this helpful

I have a stucco home in California. It has been painted with elastomeric paint and all is well....except I now want to change the texture of the stucco. Does the paint need to be removed before stucco can be applied?

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By guest (Guest Post)
May 29, 20080 found this helpful

Long time ago you painted over stucco or have a gray house. Today they have colored stucco. I want to restucco over my old stucco. What is the best way to remove the paint?

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By guest (Guest Post)
February 17, 20090 found this helpful

We have a small concrete house (stucco?) near Chicago. We were told not to paint it by a contractor who applied something like a concrete slurry and told us it would last at least 15 years. It did. But now the cracks are showing again and he is no where to be found. This method was a lot cheaper than some of the other methods we looked into. Does anyone know anything about this?

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May 24, 20170 found this helpful

Sounds like you got a FOG COAT

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February 17, 20100 found this helpful

Within the last five years or so many company's like parex offer bonding addit ives and bonding applications. Understanding that the stucco is only as strong as it's weakest link, Consider the quality of existing paint. apply the proper bonding agents to strenghten the paint( yes it's possibly). And apply a new stucco texture. It's recommended for such applications a synthetic finish.

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February 17, 20100 found this helpful

Drylok paint is made for conventional stucco. There are many different types of stucco. but basically break into two categories, Conventional and synthetic. Once properly cured neither require breath-ability. For applications below grade makes a suitable synthetic that will withstand moderate moisture exposure. All stucco should be sealed. But properly applied and cured. I own a stucco company and my advice is you get what you pay for. The lowest bid will in the long run cost you more than the highest.

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November 28, 20100 found this helpful

Stucco has been around for over 5000 years , and is by far one of the most durable economic safest exterior out there but does need a little attention, and it bothers to see guy whom think they know what there doing whom got their first pay check bought a mixer and went on the own to miss inform people and ruin their houses in some, a lot of cases, beware.

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August 6, 20140 found this helpful

It is always better to re stucco. While it is more $ if done right it will last 20 to 30 years. If you have paint on your stucco sandblasting is way to go. It will expose any cracks and or patching that needs to be done.

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September 11, 20160 found this helpful

One word: Romobio

This is a true masonry paint that allows brick and stucco to "breathe" whereas latex creates a film that may seal in moisture. This company also provides a limewash to give brick the "weathered" patchy effect and the limewash can be used on stucco (painted AND unpainted) to create a chalky, flat look. Plus, it's very good for the environment.

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