Uses for Sour Milk

There are many wonderful recipes and other uses for soured milk. This guide contains uses for sour milk.

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Uses for Sour Milk
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November 23, 2010 Flag
1 found this helpful

I would like to find uses for sour milk.

By Barbara

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July 24, 20051 found this helpful
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Pour it in the garden pour it in your compost pile ( you do have one don't you ) :-) use it to water your plants outside , and roses love it !

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January 3, 20110 found this helpful
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Only raw milk sours properly. Any milk that's been pasteurized will only rot and never sour. But if you have access to raw milk and it sours you can use it interchangeably with buttermilk. Its delish and tastes like a a mellow buttermilk.

You can add lemon juice to pasteurized milk to try and approximate soured milk, but its just not the same. If you ask me just use buttermilk. Most States make it really hard our outright ban raw milk because of some wonky misguided drive to sterilize the planet.

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November 24, 20100 found this helpful

I remember a chocolate cake that called for sour milk and you can also make pancakes and biscuits with it.

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March 25, 20110 found this helpful

Making biscuits and pancakes is a good use for sour milk. Also, if you mash potatoes, it is fine to use this. Even a casserole (such as would need milk) Other than being a little yucky to drink, sour milk can still be used for cooking. :)

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January 5, 2001 Flag
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Does anyone have any frugal uses for sour milk that is not fit to drink anymore?

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August 13, 20070 found this helpful

Pasteurized milk that has soured naturally has NOT gone rancid, It has been fermented under the action of naturally occuring lacto bacilli in the same way as it effects raw milk. While I sense a movement to return to raw milk, this product was prohibited for sale for the reason that it could possibly be unsafe, harbouring all kinds of pathogens which the pasteurization process kills. I would be reluctant to drink raw milk myself, unless it had soured. The presence of lacto bacilli and its acid environment kills off pathogens which cannot survive in such an environment. Rancid is an emotive word and is not the term that describes soured milk which is a quite naturally occuring process.

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November 13, 20070 found this helpful

What would be the ratio of baking soda to 1 C. of sour milk?

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August 19, 20111 found this helpful

Whomever it was that said raw and pasteurized milk are the same is lacking in the knowledge department. When you pasteurize something, you kill it - good and bad alike. Therefore, there is no such thing as 'naturally soured' pasteurized milk. If it turns, it is spoiled and if consumed will make you sick. Not so with soured raw milk. In fact, it's better for you that way than before because the good bacteria has multiplied and produced more goodies for your body.

Now, if you add an acid or the like to 'regular' pasteurized milk, you'll get a clabber that's much like soured milk in consistency, but it's not the same at all.

And before you start attacking what I have to say, my family (including my children) have been consuming raw milk for over seven years with no ill effects whatsoever. In fact, quite to the contrary, we don't get sick near as much as we used to on store-bought milk. Look at the link provided before for Weston A. Price Foundation - there are many resources that prove that raw milk is better for you and the environment.

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February 28, 20160 found this helpful

Is it still ok for compost piles? Thanks 

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November 22, 2010 Flag
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What is the difference between sour milk and bad milk? Can I use sour milk in baking? My carton says 11/26.

By nonna1 from Montclair, NJ

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November 22, 20101 found this helpful

I always understood sour milk to be milk that is kind of old, starting to go bad but it's still not horribly bad. Some people call this blinky milk. You wouldn't drink it this way but it's ok to use in pancakes, quick breads, etc. Your carton says Nov. 26th so it won't be sour until some time after that. To make sour milk out of fresh milk, add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or white vinegar to a cup of milk and stir. Let it stand for 10 minutes before using.

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November 23, 20100 found this helpful

I welcome soured milk. I use it even if it has separated, just shake it up and use it. Very good for baking anything, use in place of liquid. The best light pancakes you can have. I keep it in the fridge for a very long time. Makes nice bread also.

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November 30, 20101 found this helpful

Soured milk goes through a rancid stage when it smells and tastes bad (you would probably call this "spoiled milk". At this stage, leave it out of the fridge until it coagulates (a day or so, depending on the temperature). You will find that the bad smell and taste have gone. Replace it in the fridge until the sour milk is quite cold. You can either drink it or cook with it (stir first). The taste is fresh and rather like a mild, natural yoghurt. Many Europeans make sour milk as a drink to have with a meal.

Brenda from Oz.

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August 19, 20111 found this helpful

Sour milk only occurs when you have raw milk that has not been pasteurized/homogenized. If you have store milk that smells or tastes nasty, throw it out, it can make you violently sick. Sour milk, on the other hand, has more beneficial bacteria, and is quite good for you. If allows to separate, you can use the curd as sour cream, cream cheese (if you drain it off and allow it to sit in a strainer to get more whey out), and the like, it's much like yoghurt in that aspect. You can also use the whey (the watery liquid left after the curds separate) for many things too.

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July 22, 2013 Flag
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What are some good, easy recipes that use sour milk?

By Marlene

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July 25, 20130 found this helpful

Very healthy hair rinse.

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September 18, 2006 Flag
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My kids eat a lot of dairy, but it does happen that we find that a bag of milk, cottage cheese, or yogurt will be sitting in our fridge past its expiration date. I have a few recipes ( e.g. pancakes, tuna casserole) that call for buttermilk or another type of fermented milk product. So instead of throwing out these sour products, I put them in the freezer to be defrosted when I have time to prepare the recipes. The end results taste delicious, and no one, except my pocket book, is the wiser.

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