Hydrangea Flowers Have No Color

My hydrangea has no color. The flowers are the same as leaves. Why? I have lovely blue flowers all spring then blah!

Hardiness Zone: 8a


kauphykup

Ad
November 7, 20080 found this helpful
Best Answer

I am not a real gardener - but I remember somewhere reading about putting rusty iron nails in hydrangea beds to give them more iron and improve color - anyone else here know about that? The color, as I recall has something to do with the pH of the soil?

Editor's Note: My mom used to say the same thing, and would put rusty nails in the soil around hers in the Seattle area.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 7, 20080 found this helpful
Best Answer

Hydrangeas like acid, if I remember right. Before I moved, I had some Nikko blue and I put coffee grounds to keep them blue. Also use the coffee you don't finish and tea grounds as well.

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 8, 20080 found this helpful
Best Answer

Hydrangea flowers fade after blooming if left on the bush. That's just what happens, no matter how bright they were in the spring. If you want to preserve the blue color, then snip them off at their peak bloom and dry them. Otherwise, they'll fade- which is completely normal.

If you're interested in hydrangeas that continue to keep color after blooming, there are some selections that start out white, then change to mauve as they finish blooming. They stay a pretty dark pink for a long time before eventually fading all the way to brown in the winter. Blues won't do that, though. Sorry!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Flag
November 10, 20081 found this helpful
Best Answer

I worked briefly for a lawn and garden supply store, and we were taught that the more acid ph the soil, the more blue the hydrangeas will be (also the better for azaleas). So buy an appropriate acidifying fertilizer ( yes, coffee grounds are supposed to be acid ph)

I also recall my very knowledgeable boss informing someone that if their hydrangeas were planted next to a cinder block or cement wall or foundation, that the cement would leach into the surrounding soil and make it a more basic ph - less acidic, resulting in more pinkish or faded looking blooms. So the soil ph would then have to be made more acidic if they wanted blue hydrangea blooms or healthy azaleas. For some reason I have always remebered this. I hope it is useful, and please,anyone who knows otherwise, let me know!

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
August 21, 20160 found this helpful

YES!!! Our new neighbor built a huge addition and has put in a cinder-block foundation along the fence where my once beautiful blue hydrangeas bloom. They are now only a sickly green; not blue at all. I knew about adding rusty nails to make more acidic soil...but not about the PH from cinder-blocks and cement. I'll make adjustments...but I wish I could sue the neighbor for yet another annoying thing resulting from his thoughtless construction!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 7, 20080 found this helpful

Hydrangeas I have had for years in all variety of color it depends on how much acid and some root tone you add to it although my mom gets beautiful ones by adding coffee grounds and banana peels and egg shells to hers all the time! she swears by the coffee grounds but buy root tone and jump start it that way first!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 7, 20080 found this helpful

This won't fix the problem, but it may help in the short run. I have a friend who bought that transparent dried flower spray paint that's made especially for dried flowers for florists. (You can find it at most craft stores). After her hydrangeas had died and started to lose their color, she sprayed the flowers with a med color of blue and a just a hint of purple. She did this by making a mask with a paper plate with a slit and a hole cut in it to avoid spraying the coloring on the leaves. This may sound a bit tacky, but I'll tell you this, she had the most amazing and real looking hydrangeas with wonderful color that lasted well through the fall!

* The trick is to NEVER use spray paint, but actual florist paint.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Flag
November 8, 20080 found this helpful

Thanks to all of you. Now I feel like it was not my fault. I also learned that they will not bloom if cut back in fall.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 9, 20080 found this helpful

You can change the color by, adding acid. I got this out of the, bhg magazine. It said you do not have to buy colored ones, to get color. It said to add acid type things, to change the color. It has worked for me.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Flag
November 10, 20080 found this helpful

Hydrangea colors can be changed by adding white vinegar to the soil for a brighter color but this depends on the acidity of your soil.

Like Beth from MA said, they will eventually fade after being on the bush for the season.

But they make good dried flowers and they are bigger also. I think you have to leave them on the bush or the stem will dry too thin to support the flower part.

Have you tried giving them food coloring in their water? I have never heard of this happening with hydrangeas, but aren't you supposed to be able to to do this with shasta daisies?

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Flag
November 13, 20080 found this helpful

It has to do with the PH level in the ground. I have a neighbor who adds lime for pink and rhododendrun fertilizer for blue. She says you use 2-3 handfuls and place it a few inches from the roots and scratch it in to the soil. Hope this helps.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Flag
November 14, 20080 found this helpful

It could be the breed of the hydrangea. There are berrds that flower green. However most hydrangeas can change color according to the acid of the soil. I have a hydrangea tree. This is the first year it has bloomed. It had white flowers. But I decided to experiment. I put a little vinegar in the water I used to water them. Walla: Beautiful pink hydrangeas.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

Add your voice! Click below to comment. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

Related
Categories
Home and Garden Gardening FlowersNovember 7, 2008
Guides
Deadheading a Hydrangea
Deadheading a Hydrangea
Blue-Green Carpet
Paint Color to Coordinate With Blue-Green Carpet
Hydrangeas
Growing Hydrangea from Seed
Selecting Valentine's Day Flowers, A bouquet of fresh cut roses for Valentine's Day
Selecting Valentine's Day Flowers
More
🎄
Christmas Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
You are viewing the desktop version of this page: View Mobile Site
© 1997-2016 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on November 29, 2016 at 10:11:45 PM on 10.0.2.251 in 4 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
Loading Something Awesome!