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Uses for Sour Milk?

Does anyone have any frugal uses for sour milk that is not fit to drink anymore?

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January 6, 20010 found this helpful

Check your favorite cookbook. Many cakes, cookies, pancakes and waffles call for sour milk as an ingredient. I have substituted sour milk for buttermilk in recipes for pancakes or cornbread with good results. Hope this is helpful. Also check on some of the recipe sites searching for recipes using sour milk.

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Anonymous Flag
January 6, 20010 found this helpful

There are recipes, most for chocolate cake and cookies that use sour milk.

They even tell you how to make your own if you don't have any. I have an excellent cookie recipe that uses it. - Margie

Chocolate Drop Cookies

1/2 cup soft shortening (part butter or margarine)

1 cup sugar

1 egg

2 squares unsweetened chocolate (2 oz.) melted and cooled

3/4 cup buttermilk or sour milk

1 tsp. vanilla

1 3/4 cup flour

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1 cup chopped nuts if desired.

Mix shortening, sugar,egg and chocolate thoroughly. Stir in buttermilk and vanilla.

Measure flour and blend with baking soda and salt; stir in. Mix in nuts (opt). Chill at least 1 hour. Heat oven to 400 degrees.

Drop rounded teaspoons of dough 2 inches apart on cookie sheet.

Bake 8-10 minutes until no imprint remains when touched lightly with finger.

Makes 3 1/2 dozen 2 1/2" cookies.

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January 6, 20010 found this helpful

Sour milk makes great pancakes, bread, or bisquits

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Anonymous Flag
January 6, 20010 found this helpful

It's my understanding that only raw milk that has soured is safe to use in cooking. Pasteurized or homogenized milk is not safe to use in cooking. Since the deer like to nibble on our plants, I pour sour milk or cream on the shrubs the deer like and they avoid them, at least until the milk washes off in the rain. - L

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Anonymous Flag
January 10, 20010 found this helpful

I use milk that has just turned in cooking. It makes great pancakes, gives flavor to cakes and other baked foods. It can be safely used for things like scalloped potatoes, mashed potatoes, mac & cheese, etc.

- Rose B.

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January 10, 20010 found this helpful

I have a bread machine and use it to make bread dough and then I bake my loaves in the oven. My family prefers bread made with milk instead of water. I just substitute the milk for water and put it in the bread dough. The bread tastes wonderful and there is no sour taste. I have also used sour milk in muffins. There are also some cookie recipes that specifically call for sour milk.

- Stefanie

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Anonymous Flag
January 11, 20010 found this helpful

I use soured milk in a lot of baking. For anything that uses Buttermilk, you can use the sour milk.

- Sue

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January 26, 20010 found this helpful

I use sour milk in things like pancakes. Also, although vets would probably not approve, I've given it to our cats and dogs. It seems less wasteful if you can give unusable food to pets or barnyard animals. It hasn't hurt our cats or dogs yet. - Sue

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November 18, 20040 found this helpful

As mentioned above only raw milk, not homogenized milk (like the kind you buy in the store) is fit for human consumption after it has gone sour. Actually, the milk usually has gone sour before you notice it! If you need sour milk for a recipe, add some lemon juice to milk to sour it.

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January 10, 20070 found this helpful

MaKES GREAT SODA BREAD

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May 29, 20070 found this helpful

The previous comments about only raw milk that has soured being suitable for cooking with sounds interesting. But where are you all getting your information? Why isn't using pasteurized milk that has soured safe for cooking?

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May 29, 20070 found this helpful

Okay, I found the answer! Pasteurized milk that has soured hasn't "soured" in the natural term, but has actually gone rancid. Raw milk, on the other hand, since it hasn't been pasteurized, still has all of the good bacteria that allow it to sour naturally, so it can actually be healthy for you.

Here's the website I got the info from: http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/maximize_rawmilk.html

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July 26, 20070 found this helpful

Absolute rubbish regarding the not using none pasteurised milk. The pasteurisation predominatly kills coliforms, listeria, salmonella etc.

The souring, which is the same process in both pasteurised and unpasterised milk, is caused by lactic acid bacteria - its the production of the acid that causes the souring and the curdling. This process is absolutely vital in unpasteurised milk as its stops the harmful bactiera (coliforms, listeria etc) reproducing which otherwise would be a significant threat IF you used the milk and it wasnt involved in a cooking process that raised the temperature above about 70oC.

Overall provided the souring has occured and provided a cooking process is used, the milk employed is irrelevant.

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August 13, 20070 found this helpful

What absolute nonsense. Pasteurized milk which has soured naturally is perfectly safe to use in cooking or even for eating as it is. Full fat soured milk ferments to give an almost yoghurt-like consistency. I often add naturally soured milk to my sourdough pancake batter, to my sourdough dough in bread baking and to make scones or girdle cakes with. For the last two add a level teaspoon of baking soda to the mix before mixing in the sour milk. The acid of the milk reacts with the baking soda to effervesce, forming carbon dioxide bubbles which acts as a leavening agent. This method of leavening has been used since at least the 1800's. The same leavening is used to make traditional irish soda bread. Since raw milk is almost impossible to obtain here in the United Kindom, only from the farm gate, I have never used it so can give no informed opinion on it.

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August 13, 20070 found this helpful

Pasteurized milk that has soured naturally has NOT gone rancid, It has been fermented under the action of naturally occuring lacto bacilli in the same way as it effects raw milk. While I sense a movement to return to raw milk, this product was prohibited for sale for the reason that it could possibly be unsafe, harbouring all kinds of pathogens which the pasteurization process kills. I would be reluctant to drink raw milk myself, unless it had soured. The presence of lacto bacilli and its acid environment kills off pathogens which cannot survive in such an environment. Rancid is an emotive word and is not the term that describes soured milk which is a quite naturally occuring process.

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November 13, 20070 found this helpful

What would be the ratio of baking soda to 1 C. of sour milk?

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August 19, 20111 found this helpful

Whomever it was that said raw and pasteurized milk are the same is lacking in the knowledge department. When you pasteurize something, you kill it - good and bad alike. Therefore, there is no such thing as 'naturally soured' pasteurized milk. If it turns, it is spoiled and if consumed will make you sick. Not so with soured raw milk. In fact, it's better for you that way than before because the good bacteria has multiplied and produced more goodies for your body.

Now, if you add an acid or the like to 'regular' pasteurized milk, you'll get a clabber that's much like soured milk in consistency, but it's not the same at all.

And before you start attacking what I have to say, my family (including my children) have been consuming raw milk for over seven years with no ill effects whatsoever. In fact, quite to the contrary, we don't get sick near as much as we used to on store-bought milk. Look at the link provided before for Weston A. Price Foundation - there are many resources that prove that raw milk is better for you and the environment.

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February 28, 20160 found this helpful

Is it still ok for compost piles? Thanks 

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