Cassata

In the Middle Ages, it was a specialty to be found only in the monasteries of Palermo where nuns had perfected the dessert and sold it to the public

Ingredients

Bottom layer:

  • 2 eggs ,separated
  • 3 Tbsp. icing sugar
  • 3/4 cup cream
  • 60 g. (2 oz) almonds

Middle Layer:

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  • 125 g. (4oz) chocolate
  • 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 Tbsp. icing sugar (powered)
  • 3/4 cups cream

Top Layer:

  • 3 Tbsp. icing sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup cream
  • 25 g. (1/2 oz) chopped preserved ginger
  • 50 g. (11/2 oz) halved glaceed cherries
  • 200 g. (6 oz) mixed glaceed fruits
  • 1 tsp. vanilla essence (extract)

Directions:

Line a 20 cm. (8 inch) square tin.

Bottom Layer: Beat egg whites until peaks form. Add icing sugar, beat, and keep aside. Whip the cream and fold into the whites along with the egg yolks. Stir the almond flakes and pour into the tin. Freeze 60 minutes.

Middle Layer: Melt the chocolate in a double boiler. Add cocoa and stir. Cool a bit. Beat egg whites until peaks form. Add icing sugar, beat, and keep aside . Whip the cream and fold into the whites along with the egg yolks. Pour over bottom layer, level it, and chill for 60 minutes.

Top Layer: Beat egg whites until peaks form. Add icing sugar, beat, and keep aside. Whip the cream and fold into the whites along with the egg yolks. Stir in the fruits and essence. Pour over the middle layer and level it. Freeze overnight

Source: http://www.grouprecipes.com

By LRP from LWL, MA

July 29, 20100 found this helpful

Sounds delicious but I have a lot of concerns about using so many raw eggs without any heat or acid, both of which kills bacteria. The temperature needed to melt chocolate (<100F) is too low.

More interesting is the description: "In the Middle Ages, it was a specialty to be found only in the monasteries of Palermo where nuns had perfected the dessert and sold it to the public"

That's not possible because the Middle Ages is defined as the 5th to 15th centuries. Two of the ingredients, chocolate and vanilla, weren't introduced to Europe until the 16th century. More importantly, refrigeration wasn't available in the Middle Ages to chill or freeze the layers. Chemical cooling was invented in the 16th century but the cooling was way too weak, and items (i.e. wine bottles) had to be submerged in water. The sustained cooling necessary in this recipe wasn't available until the late 19th century, and smaller home units weren't sold until the early 20th century. :)

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ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
July 29, 20100 found this helpful

It does sound good. If you are troubled by the raw eggs, use pasteurized eggs.

Conquistador Cortés is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

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