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Making a Screen Door

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Screen Door

When your door is open and the bugs start flying, it is nice to keep them out of your home. This guide is about making a screen door.

Solutions: Making a Screen Door

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Tip: Homemade Door Screen

We don't have a screen on our door because the doggies ruin it. My German Shepherd jumped through our glass storm door when it was a juvenile, and we haven't had a screen since. We leave our front door open all the time but we need a screen because I hate flies. I put up a small pressure rod for a curtain at the top of our front door opening then I put one sheer white panel on the rod. This works wonders for keeping flies and other bugs out and it lets air in and the dogs and cats just push it out of the way to get in and out.

I was going to order a velcro screen from mail order but thought I would try this first. I am glad I did. The sheer see through panel moves in the breeze and the flies don't like to see movement.

By Robyn Fed from Hampton TN

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Questions

Here are questions related to Making a Screen Door.

Question: Making a Screen Door

This isn't really home Improvement, but store improvement. I work at a thrift store where 100% of our proceeds go to the shelter and we have shelter animals right at the store who are up for adoption (11 cats running around, never a dull moment).

Now we would like to keep our donation door open to let in the spring air, but yet we don't want our cats running out of the store. I saw some door products such as this one. stacksandstacks.com. However our door is too wide. Our door measurements are 3 feet 9 inches wide and 7 feet and 1 inches tall, and we have a metal frame.

Any ideas on making a screen door "with a latch" so the cats can't just push it way out. Any input would be great.

By Bill from Holland, MI


Most Recent Answer

By Ann Winberg [282]03/19/2010

Making a simple wooden frame to fit inside your metal frame wouldn't be that hard, surely you have someone who could help with the project. With one that large make sure to put good cross bracing on it. Also with the cats running around I would suggest using hail screen at the bottom to keep them from scratching holes in it. I wish you all the luck in the world in your wonderful work, if I were closer I would sure help you out.

Question: Temporary Screen Door

I moved into a small apartment last summer. The problem is they do not have any screen doors. I only have 2 small windows in the apartment which provide no ventilation. The flies come in when I leave the doors open for ventilation and light (the apartment is dark and dreary and I have to have lights on during daylight hours).

I need help with making a temporary screen door or something to keep the flies out and not damage the doorway. The idiots that built this place put door bells on the back doors where there are no apartment numbers. I think they built this on a friday.

Thank you in advance,
kathleen48 from So. Portland, ME


Best Answers

By pam munro [447]08/03/2009

I use a lace panel that I string across the opened door from a nail on the left inside doorjamb to a peg holder (originally for cups?) on the inside of the door where we hang hats. (you can unhook it to go through the door. But I saw a WWII movie where they tacked up mosquito netting over doors in the tropics - & next time I find an abandoned bed net (now usually decorative) I will buy it & try to cut it down & use that. We like to keep the door open, as there is an updraft in our apartment hall - & the lacy covering also indicates that we want privacy.


Best Answers

By Grandma Margie (Guest Post)06/12/2006

Check out the catalogs put out by Lillian Vernon or Walter Drake (wdrake.com). In their "search" blank type in "door screen". They both have some and they're not terribly expensive....around $10.00 I think. They are for temporary use. I've seen some held in place with magnets and others use self-stick tabs. Good Luck!


Best Answers

By Jill [4]06/12/2006

I would go to the hardware store and buy a piece of fiberglass screening big enough to cover the doorway, plus about 6 inches in length. Then I would go to the fabric store and buy enough extra-wide, double-fold bias tape to go around the perimeter, and fabric glue (if you cannot sew).

Depending on how you want to attach it to the doorway, you will also need either: some sew-on and some sticky back velcro; OR some strong thread (or string), a few finishing nails (they're thin and not long) AND some curtain weights.

Sew (or glue) the bias tape around the perimeter of the screen. Then stitch a length of sew-on velcro to the top edge of the screen, and apply some sticky-back to the top of the doorway. You might also want to apply some on each side of the lower edge to get a better "seal". Do a test-piece first; but the velcro should come off the doorway if you heat it up with a hair dryer to soften the glue first.

If you can't apply the velcro, fold up the bottom edge of the screening and stitch it in place to make a "pocket" for the weights. (You can hand or machine sew.) Then with strong thread or string, make some loops at the top--one at each corner, and a few in between. Holding the screen up to the doorway, hammer the finishing nails (brads) into the top of the frame for the loops of thread. When you move, you can remove the nails, and fill the holes with a bit of waterproof putty or caulk--if you put them in the top, they won't show.

When you're at the hardware store, price the replacement screens for a sliding glass door. I have no idea how much framed screens are; if they're not much, you might just go that route, and set it in place. You could also ask someone who does remodelling if you might get one when they replace a slider.

Have you asked the landlord about it? If you had the work done, you might be able to deduct all or part of the cost ofhaving a real one put in place from your rent.

Good luck; no ventilation isn't fun!