Churning Butter

I am a homeschooling parent of a 5th grader. I thought it might be fun to learn to churn our own butter (the only problem is that I don't know how). Does anyone have a recipe and directions? Thanks.

Nicolle from Peyton, CO

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February 11, 20090 found this helpful

When I was doing my student teaching in a first grade class the master teacher made butter with the kids by putting whole milk in a jar, tightening the lid, and shaking and shaking and shaking! Didn't really take too long as I remember and the kids thought it was great fun.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

You want to use cream...not milk. Google it, very simple process.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

We had a cow when I was growing up so my Mother used to skim off the cream daily and when she had enough, she divided it into three jars for a 10, 9 and 7 year old and we had to shake the jar until butter formed. We also had a paddle churn that would do it. But none of us liked it as well as the jar method. Probably because the churn was a one person job. I remember good times with the three of us shaking the jars to see who could get it to the butter stage first! My mother then took over by gathering the lumps of butter together and kneading it until all of the water was out, adding a little salt for flavor.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

Whole Milk will not make butter. Unless you have a cow and can skim the cream off the top of the fresh milk after it has separated, you will have to buy Whipping Cream. But shaking the jar is the way to make it. As the oldest of 16 kids, (ten when I was still at home) that was always our job to make the butter. And we would take turns shaking until it "came together". Then you set it in the fridge and let it get cold.

When it is nice and cold and the butter is not so soft, you drain off the "buttermilk", put the butter into a bowl, and cover it with clear very cold water. Work the butter with a large spoon by pressing and turning, and draining off any liquid that comes out. Continue this until the water is running clear. Add a little salt and work that into the butter. Takes time, but what a treat!

Be sure to save the buttermilk that you drain off for the best buttermilk pancakes you ever tasted. I haven't done that since my kids were little, and we were buying milk from a farmer. Guess I'll splurge on some whipping cream and make some butter! Harlean from Arkansas

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

My sister in law teaches 5th grade, they make butter as part of their Oregon Trail project. She uses baby food jars with a marble inside. Of course that's to just make a little. My dad has a butter churn, glass jar with wooden paddles connected to a handle to turn. You want to use heavy cream or if you can get fresh from the cow strain your own.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

Just shake cream till it turns to butter, add some salt, rinse and you are done.

A previous posted stated whole milk. Whole milk will NOT work, only cream

A grocery store will have cream or call your county extension office and get the name of a nearby dairy (add a tour of it into your lesson)

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

I have heard that if you take whipping cream and beat it long enough with electric beaters, you will make butter. You will also have to do the rinsing as described by the earlier post.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

Butter is made from milk solids. If you want it to be salt-free, you're going to need to use it up rather quickly, or else put it in the freezer (VERY well wrapped).

If you want it to keep, sprinkle a little pinch of salt -- maybe 1/8 teaspoon for every 2 C of heavy cream. Salt is a natural preservative, and will help a great deal with keeping the butter fresh for longer.

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

Just use regular whipping cream. Beat with an electric mixter and it will turn into butter. Dont forget to add salt if you want lightly salted butter. ~Janette~

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February 12, 20090 found this helpful

I agree with some of the other post,you have to milk the cow, put milk in fridg in a bowl. Let the cream rise to the top of the milk, wait over night for the cream, then skim the cream off into a jar with a lid. Shake it till you see butter then spoon out the butter into a bowl, add water to it stir it a minute.

Drain off the water, do this till the water is clear. Add a little salt, stir then put it into a cup or a small dish, let cool. It's ready to eat. We like fresh hot homemade biscuits with fresh butter,make good biscuits with the butter milk,so good. Good luck.

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February 13, 20090 found this helpful

Janette and the others are right--just whip whipping cream until it's butter, adding salt if you want it. Years ago, I was helping with an after-school program where the kids used an ordinary manual eggbeater (not electric) to whip cream to top treats they'd made. If they went a little too far, they got butter instead of whipped cream--and that was without electricity!

The cream off the top of true whole milk from a farm will work, too, but not if the milk has been homogenized or if the cream has already been removed (as it has for the "whole" milk sold in the grocery".

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February 13, 20090 found this helpful

This is how we make butter at our house: First, the milk must stand in a cold place about 24 hours so all the cream can separate out. Skim that off. Put it in a quart jar and let it sit on the counter until it reaches 68 degrees. You can shake it, but it takes from now till Christmas! I put mine in the blender and let it run until the butterfat has separated out. Skim that off into a 3-4 quart bowl and work it with the back of a wooden spoon to get all the milk out. Now add some water and work it some more to get the milky water out. When the rinse waters run clear (it may take 4-5 times) you have unsalted butter. To one pound of butter you add 1 teaspoon of salt. This is a tiny bit saltier than store bought salt, but it sure tastes good! You will probably only get a quarter pound or so from one quart of cream, so that should be a quarter teaspoon of salt. Put it in the refrigerator to firm up, and have some on homemade bread or some crackers. This is great stuff! Save the leftover buttermilk in a tightly covered jar and leave it on the counter until it clabbers a little. This takes a day or so. It makes the best pancakes and biscuits you ever tasted -- light and tender and so good! Just use your regular recipes for those foods.

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February 15, 20090 found this helpful

When I was teaching, we would put heavy cream & a little salt into a tall plastic container & shake & shake & shake until the cream became butter. Then we would enjoy the butter with crackers.

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February 15, 20090 found this helpful

When I was a kid, we used to get raw milk in glass gallon jars from my grandparents dairy.

We'd skim the cream off the top and fill a quart glass canning jar 2/3rds full, plus a pinch of salt.

My 2 sisters and I would sit at the kitchen table and taking turns, would shake or roll the quart jar until we'd see the butter globs start to form. Then, we really went to town, shaking or rolling it.

Once the cream was of a butter consistency, our mom would remove the mass from the jar, hand shape it into cubes, wrap in foil and refrigerate.

It was awesome, on toast, pancakes, biscuits.

Yum.

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