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Homemade Clock Ideas

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kitchen pitcher clock

Many interesting things can be a housing for clock works. This guide contains homemade clock ideas.

Solutions: Homemade Clock Ideas

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Upcycled Vinyl Record Clock

finished clock

Looking for a something to do with those old vinyl records? Turn them into a kitchen clock as a special birthday gift for a friend. A real budget-friendly craft that delivers a pleasing end result!

Approximate Time: 2 hours

Yield: one clock

Supplies:

  • one old 12" long play vinyl record
  • two napkins with suitable pictures printed on them ~ for this project, napkins with mushrooms and the word mushroom in different languages were used
  • clockwork, with fitting clock hands
  • set of plastic numbers for the clock's face
  • one portrait hook
  • white water-based primer
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • acrylic paint in the following three colors: flesh, true red and antique bronze
  • an 8/32" paint brush
  • hairdryer
  • pencil
  • standard scissors
  • few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • a sponge ~ use one that was inside a medicine bottle
  • strong bonding glue

Steps:

  1. With a slightly wet brush, paint a thin layer of the white water-based primer over the one side of the record and dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  2. Clean the brush, and then paint a thin layer of flesh-colored acrylic over the same side of the record. Dry with the hairdryer.
  3. Cut out the different sections from the napkins and decide how they will be arranged on the record. It is best to make a collage, where the different cutouts will overlap with one another, as this creates a more interesting end result.
  4. Remove the bottom layers from all the napkin cutouts.
  5. Put the first cutout in place and paint a substantial amount of Modge Podge over the top of the cutout, so that it will stick to the record. Be careful when doing napkin decoupage, as the napkin can stretch or tear easily. Start painting from the middle of the cutout towards the sides, and work in small triangles. The Modge Podge must only be applied to the top, and must not run underneath the cutout.
  6. Use the hairdryer to dry the cutout.
  7. Repeat steps 5-6 with all the other cutouts, until the collage has been completed. Turn the record around and cut off any pieces of napkin that may protrude over the edge of the record.
  8. napkin images decoupaged in place
  9. Add some color to the design by using the sponge to give the outer edges of the record a wash with the true red acrylic paint. Remember not to use too much paint when using a sponge, as this will cause the paint to smudge. Remove excess paint by dabbing it onto a sheet of newspaper before applying the sponge. Let the paint dry, and then use the sponge to add some antique bronze acrylic paint to the middle of the record.
  10. paint accents added prior to adding numbers
  11. Use the brush again and paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the record. The Modge Podge will protect the pictures. When applying the first layer of Modge Podge, be careful not to lift the cutouts at the edges when brushing over them with the paint brush.
  12. Dry the record with the hairdryer.
  13. Repeat steps 9-10 ~ you need to apply at least 4 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the record must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  14. Add a layer of water-based varnish to the record and dry thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  15. Using strong bonding glue, glue the numbers in position.
  16. Using strong bonding glue again, glue the portrait hook in position on the back of the clockwork and wait for it to dry thoroughly.
  17. Fit the clockwork and the clock hands.

By BessieBessie [130]

Music Lover's Clock

My friend's teenage son is part of a band. He loves rock music and plays the electrical guitar. For his birthday, I wanted to make a wall-mountable clock that would fit his interests. The completed project.

Approximate Time: 2 hours

Supplies:

  • one old 45 rpm single play vinyl record
  • a printout of a photo of Elvis, the King of Rock and Roll
  • pencil
  • utility (Stanley) knife
  • a 10/32 inch paint brush
  • white water-based primer
  • Paper Seal
  • Deco Art glue
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • hairdryer
  • a pair of standard scissors
  • a few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • an old cloth
  • a clockwork, with fitting clock hands
  • a set of plastic numbers for the clock's face
  • strong bonding glue
  • one portrait hook
  • one ear-bud

Instructions:

  1. Visit Wikipedia Elvis Jailhouse Rock for the photo, this photo is part of the public domain and is not copyrighted.

  2. Print the photo out on ordinary white paper.

  3. Position the record over the printout of the photo and draw a circle around the edge of the record. 45 RPM record

  4. Draw a circle in the middle of the printout, the same size as the hole in the middle of the record, and use the utility knife to cut this smaller circle out. Circle drawn on Elvis printout.

  5. With a slightly wet brush, paint a thin layer of the white water-based primer over the one side of the record and dry it thoroughly with a hairdryer.

  6. Clean the brush, and then paint a thin layer of Paper Seal over the printout of the photo. The Paper Seal will protect the ink from running and will make it easier to cut out the printout without tearing it.

  7. Dry the printout of the photo thoroughly with a hairdryer.

  8. Cut out the printout of the photo. Print out cut into circle.

  9. Paint a substantial amount of Deco Art glue to the back of the printout. Turn the printout of the photo around and put it in position on the record, but do not press it down. Brushing Deco Art glue onto back of printout.

  10. With the brush, spread glue to the front of the printout of the photo, lightly applying pressure so that it will stick to the record. Brushing glue onto front of printout.

  11. Working from the middle of the printout, and from inside towards the outside, rub out all the air bubbles and excess glue from the back of the printout. Use an old cloth to clear any excess glue from the record. Use an ear-bud to clear excess glue from the hole in the centre of the record where the clockwork will be fitted. Rubbing out bubbles and extra glue.

  12. Use the hairdryer to dry the printout of the photo thoroughly and be careful not to use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer, as the vinyl of the record might become damaged.

  13. Turn the record around and cut off any pieces of paper that may protrude over the edge of the record.

  14. Paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the front of the record. The Modge Podge will protect the picture and give the product a smoother finish.

  15. Dry the record thoroughly with a hairdryer, again ensuring not to use the hairdryer's highest heat setting.

  16. Repeat steps 13-14. You need to apply at least 3 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical, to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the record must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  17. Add a layer of water-based varnish to the record. Use the hairdryer to dry the record.

  18. Using strong bonding glue, glue the numbers in position. Gluing the numbers in position.

  19. Fit the clockwork, but do not yet add the clock hands.

  20. Using strong bonding glue again, glue the portrait hook in position on the back of the clockwork and wait for it to dry thoroughly. Gluing the portrait hook in position.

  21. Fit the clock hands.

By BessieBessie from Pretoria, Gauteng,

Tip: Craft Project: Updating A Promotional Clock

Updated Promotional Clock with Photo of Dogs

A Dog Gone Good Time (Or how to redo a Doctor's Clock) We have all seen them a million times hanging in the doctor's office, some pharmaceutical company wanting to promote their latest drug gave our doctor a free clock. Now our wonderful doctor, not wanting to be rude, hangs it in the waiting room for a couple of months until some lawyer files a suit against that drug and the clock ends up in the thrift store. Lucky us because the thrift store will sell us that clock really cheap because it has advertising on it.

I paid a dollar for the one in the picture. I loved the blue and green together and thought I need a new clock for my office. But I am not a big fan of advertising, unless it is something cute like the Campbell's kids, so I thought, "Why not try and redo it?" I found taking it apart was a snap (no harder than the kits you buy at Walmart or Michael's) and I had a calendar from last year with puppies on it that I just loved so I thought why not combine the two?

After I used the old calendar picture I got to thinking that I could have printed out any number of my pictures of my grandsons or family photos to use for this project. I also thought the an old piece of lace or embroidery or a piece of an old quilt could have also been used with a minimum of sewing. Just know what ever you use, it needs to be thin so that you still have room for the hands to move. So here are my instructions for redoing a old clock.

Time to complete: A half an hour

Materials

  • One old doctor's promotional clock
  • One old calendar picture
  • Some spray glue
  • Painters tape
  • Measuring tape

Instructions

First I took apart the clock and took the working clock box off the back. Then I measured the raised circle in the middle. I made a cardboard template for it and then cut out my picture from the old calendar page. I masked off the outside ring with painter's tape and then sprayed on the spray glue and affixed the picture to the center. I then put the clock back together.

Now I have a great clock for my office and it only cost me a dollar and a half hour of my time.

Happy Recycling!

By Debra Frick

Tip: Clock Made With A Wicker Wreath

I made a clock (sorry I can't send a picture) out of an 8 inch wicker wreath.

Materials

  • 8 inch wicker wreath natural color
  • round of craft wood cut to fit inside the wreath
  • clock works
  • 12 similar sized seashells
  • Rit dye in blue-green color
  • scrap of netting in a neutral color
  • hot glue

Directions

Mix the dye and following package directions dye the wreath and wood. Let dry. Drill a hole in the middle of the wood and stretch the piece of netting over it. Glue the wood and netting into center of wreath leaving enough room in the back for the clock works. Install the clock works then divide the wreath into twelve sections and glue a shell in each position. Very nautical!

By Betsy from Joplin, MO

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