Propagating Hydrangeas

Propagating hydrangeas from cuttings is surprisingly easy and a great way to increase your plantings and share with neighbors. This is a guide about propagating hydrangeas.


June 23, 2009 Flag
2 found this helpful

If you love hydrangeas, as I do, now is the time to propagate them. If you don't have one, maybe a neighbor would let you take a few cuttings. It won't harm the existing plant, so don't be shy in asking. In about 6 weeks you'll be able to plant the cuttings in their permanent site.

I took my cuttings from a Macrophylla Hydrangea. They are very adaptable, I have one planted on the north side of my house (shady) and one on the south side (sunny) and some in dappled sun, under trees. They all bloom beautifully! I have propagated all my hydrangeas this way, but I recently read you can place the cuttings in water to root them. You might want to try that.

Approximate Time: 1/2 hour



  1. Prepare the growing medium first. Mix equal parts of peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite.
  2. Ad

  3. Put mixture into 4 inch pots, add water to moisten.
  4. Place the prepared pots on the tray.
  5. Take 6 cuttings from the newer green growth, preferably without flower buds, about a quarter inch thick and 6 inches long. Gently strip all but the top leaves. (Too many leaves make the cutting strain to feed all those leaves.)
  6. Ad

  7. Pour about a tablespoon of rooting hormone on a paper plate (read label for any precautions). Wet the bottom inch of each cutting, roll the wet part of cuttings in the rooting hormone. Poke your finger in the peat moss mixture about 2 inches deep, to form the hole for your cutting. Place each cutting into holes and push dirt back into place.
  8. Pour a little water in the tray. (You could cover in plastic if desired) I don't cover; I keep in a shady spot for about 6 weeks, water to keep moist but not drenched.
  9. Ad

  10. After 6 weeks, acclimate the plant to where you want to plant it. Check to see if there seems to be enough rooting system to plant your cuttings. If so, plant in groups of 3. (3 cuttings should be sufficient to form a nice hydrangea) Place a marker where you planted it, they lose their leaves in winter and you might forget about it.
  11. Comment On This PostWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
    June 23, 20090 found this helpful

    I propagated my English laurel hedges the way you describe. The only thing I did differently was, I used playground sand instead of the "peat moss, vermiculite and perlite" mixture. I also tried a half & half peat moss & playground sand mix but my cuttings ALL died. I figured there was something bad in the peat moss or it was the wrong kind. I know you HAVE to use playground sand & not the sand made for brick patios etc because that kind has a weed killer mixed in to it.

    ---> My question for you is this: I've always loved hydrangeas but haven't grown them because I was told by someone at a plant nursery that Hydrangeas were named that (beginning with "Hydra") because they need so very much water & me, not wanting to water anything if I don't have to (I live in Seattle & am spoiled) I haven't planted hydrangeas because I don't want to raise my water bill. Last week I heard that this isn't true & they don't need a lot of water. Which is true. Do Hydrangeas need daily watering, or can they go a week or more without being watered? The person who told me this has 10 or more hydrangeas & they are all planted right next to a creek in her back yard where they can suck up as much water as they need.

    * Also, should you fertilize them, & if so how often?

    ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
    June 23, 20090 found this helpful

    In response to Cyinda.; watering once or twice a week should be fine, depending on weather conditions. If it's hot and dry with no rain for a week, then the hydrangea might need watering twice that week. The plant will droop a bit, letting you know it needs the water. I have 5 plants and haven't had a bit of trouble. I live in NJ. If you're in Seattle I would imagine you get enough rain to satisfy the hydrangea. As with most plants, if it's new, it would need tender loving care the 1st year. Planting in the shade would have you watering less than if it were placed in full sun. I don't fertilize, But lime will make the blooms pink and 'Miracid' will make them blue! Fun!

    ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
    June 24, 20090 found this helpful

    Want your hydrangeas to remain fresh, bright & colorful well into the autumn months? Instead of picking & bringing them in to dry, try this: When the blooms start drying on the vine & looking tired & old my friend sprays her's with transparent florist spray (made for silk or dried flowers) while the blooms are still attached to the bush. She uses blue & a light purple or fuchsia & masks the stem off by cutting a slice out of a paper plate then slipping the stem of the flower through the slice then spraying it. Your old dried hydrangea blooms will look like new & the color will remain bright & beautiful for at least 2 extra months!

    Don't use regular spray paint. For real looking color you need the transparent floral spray (this spray comes in a can & is sold at most craft stores).

    --> I know this tip sounds crazy, but I was pleasantly surprised at how fresh & real these sprayed hydrangeas looked! ...and, one can of coloring will last you for years.

    ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
    June 26, 20090 found this helpful

    I just tried this and have about 10 cutting that are about 10 days old. Can't wait to see if some make it! I'm also trying it with climbing roses. We'll see.

    Here's the advice I used, but I'm doing mine inside in cups.

    ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

April 26, 2010 Flag
0 found this helpful

I have tried to propagate hydrangeas and have not had any luck. When is the best time to take the cuttings? Any help will be very much appreciated with detailed propagation tips.

Hardiness Zone: 6a

By Theresa from St Charles, MO

Answer This QuestionWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
April 26, 20100 found this helpful

Follow these steps to grow hydrangeas from cuttings.

ModerateInstructionsThings You'll Need:


Small planter

Aluminum sulfate

Hydrangea cuttings


Sandy soil


Small shovel

Step 1Start new cuttings in the spring, though you can start them as late as August. Choose a cutting that has two or three pairs of leaves. Cut about 6 to 8 inches from the nonflowering stem and remove the bottom pair of leaves.

Step 2Add moist, sandy soil to a small planter cup. Plant the cutting in the soil and cover it with a glass jar. Place the jar in bright, but not direct, light. Leave until roots form. You can also put the cutting in a glass of water. Again, place in bright, but not direct, light.

Step 3Plant the cutting outside, after the roots have been established. Pick a mostly sunny area. Dig a hole that is two times the size of the root ball, place the cutting in the hole and cover it with dirt. Add mulch to the top of the hole to fertilize and help maintain moisture. Water immediately.

Step 4Fertilize with a multipurpose plant fertilizer after 6 weeks. Carefully follow package directions.

Step 5Water frequently, since hydrangeas are water-loving plants. If the plant looks wilted, water immediately or you risk not having any blooms.

Step 6Prune hydrangeas in winter to very early spring. If pruned too late, the hydrangea may not bloom that year. If you are unsure as to proper pruning time, do nothing at all. Let the hydrangea bloom and then carefully prune it. Some hydrangeas will grow only in new stems, and others will bloom from old stems.

Step 7Change the acidity of the soil to change the color of the hydrangeas. Acidic soils yield blue flowers. Alkaline soil gives pink flowers, and neutral soils produce white blossoms. To reduce the acidity of soil, add lime. Add aluminum sulfate to increase the acidity.

P S-I just cut off a limb,stick it the soil,keep damp.

good luck.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
April 27, 20100 found this helpful

Steps above are great! It does take a few attempts. I took some cuttings last summer and they looked great. I planted them in the fall and it doesn't look like they are making it. Might have been our cold winter, not sure.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
April 30, 20100 found this helpful

My best friend, whom I call my Master Gardener, Has started new hydrangeas by laying a low branch on the ground in the soil. She places something like a rock on the branch to keep it held down. By next spring, you should be able to cut the main branch from the "Mother" bush and transplant your new bush where you want. Good luck! It has worked for her. Lots of shrubs can be done this way.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Home and Garden Gardening CuttingsNovember 29, 2012
Dividing Hydrangeas
Wine grapes growing.
Propagating Grape Vines from Cuttings
Growing Hydrangeas Inside
Growing Hydrangeas Inside
Photo of a purple Hydrangea.
Changing the Color of Hydrangeas
Halloween Ideas!
Ask a Question
Share a Post
You are viewing the desktop version of this page: View Mobile Site
© 1997-2016 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on October 27, 2016 at 3:19:28 PM on in 2 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
Loading Something Awesome!