Saving Money on Heating Costs

Heating our homes can be very expensive. This is a guide about saving money on heating costs.
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March 16, 2012 Flag
12 found this helpful

If we have been using the oven during the winter or cooler months, we leave the oven door open after baking. The heat is turned off of course but my goodness, all the heat you can "recycle" by simply leaving the oven door open for a few minutes.

I refer to it as "recycled heat" because we've just paid for it to cook/bake with and now we can use it for additional warmth to the kitchen area. You don't want to do this during the summer or hotter months because it will make your kitchen even hotter. However, during the cold winter months, it sure feels good to feel it rolling out of the oven.

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By Marsha from Greenville, NC

March 22, 20120 found this helpful

I have always done this, but instead of leaving the door completely open i put a couple of potholders to "wedge" it open and the heat lasts a long time. I once read that a hot, turned off oven can heat up to 1000 cubic feet (slightly larger than a 10 x12 room) for almost 3 hours!

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January 30, 20130 found this helpful

Well it's obvious that everyone's been doing this for decades. It's a good OLD idea.

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March 9, 20150 found this helpful

November 4, 2014 Flag
5 found this helpful

What do you need in winter? Heat and humidification. Disconnect the dryer vent in the winter and let the heat and moisture stay inside. Smells nice too.

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November 9, 20140 found this helpful

Hi RoseAnne and Louise, I have not had any mold problems from doing this. I only do it in the winter. My house is so dry in the winter that I have to use humidifiers anyway. I live in Massachusetts. If your dryer is in a laundry room just leave the door to the rest of the house open. If your dryer is in a very small basement just leave the basement door open while the dryer is on. You can buy a humidity meter for less than 5 dollars to keep track of the level.

You can estimate the amount of water in your laundry by weighing it. One pint of water weighs one pound. So, for example, if your laundry weighs 8 pounds, you should expect roughly 4 quarts of moisture, or one gallon. That is about what some bedside humidifiers hold to get through the night, just in one bedroom. Also, mold requires a steady source of moisture rather than an intermittent source. Note, I only use non toxic laundry detergent. You could add some mold adverse fragrances to the washer like using a bit of Dr. Bronner's organic lavender liquid soap, or eucalyptus.

Watch out for lavender scented detergents because they may contain chemicals you don't want in the air. You can also make your own dryer sheets by adding a few drops of organic essential lavender oil to a washcloth. Plants love the moisture too. Give it a try and let us know if it works for you.

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November 21, 20140 found this helpful

What about the dust from the excess lint the filter doesn't catch? Does your house get a lot of dust?

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December 1, 20140 found this helpful

February 8, 2010 Flag
2 found this helpful

I believe everyone these days are complaining about the high electrics bills we are receiving. The company which supplies my electricity keeps going up several times a year.

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January 9, 2009 Flag
1 found this helpful

Advice for saving money on heating costs from the ThriftyFun community. If you have a wood burning stove, this helps run that during the day throughout your home and shut off the oil heat and only use the oil heat at night when you are sleeping.

A furnace for a home.

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March 4, 2010 Flag

To save on your heating and cooling costs, keep your closet doors closed (same for dresser drawers, cabinet doors and such). Why pay to heat spaces you are not living in?

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December 7, 2007 Flag
1 found this helpful

Tips and advice to heat your home for less this winter as suggested from the ThriftyFun community. To help heat our home, we winterize by covering all the windows with the plastic made especially for them.

Thermostat

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November 24, 2008 Flag
0 found this helpful

To save on heating fuel in the winter, insert the drain plug in the tub when showering and leave it in afterward until the water is cool. It adds warmth as well as humidity to your home. It's such an easy thing to do!

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October 1, 2009 Flag
0 found this helpful

I was wondering if anyone could tell me approximately how much money they've saved on heating bills by putting plastic in the windows to keep drafts out? I know this will depend on a lot of things, but I'm just trying to see if this is worth doing.

I'm on the 2nd floor of a two family house built in the early 1930s. I suspect the windows are the originals. I have a gas furnace that is probably at least 10 years old. I live in Upstate New York where it is pretty much cold and snowy from November through April.

By Kitschqueen from Syracuse, NY

October 2, 20090 found this helpful

Everything helps! My 100 year old house has original windows in a large portion of it. We put heavy plastic between the window and storm window as well as insulated drapes and shades on the inside. Because I have a leaded window between the big picture window and fully insulated front porch, I just have insulated drapes, shades for that.

I also made special curtain/drapes for the upstairs bedrooms. My granddaughters' room has 3 pair of fully sewn drapes, one over the other. Done in colors that make it look darling with all of them on the window. The last one on top is a poly white fabric that looks somewhat shear but is like a nylon fabric. The other colors all come through. Nice days, I take the under curtain, wrap it around the top in circular loop style. It is the princess room, so we have the pinks, blues, yellows, white, greens all together in the curtains, rather than the paint on the walls.

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October 5, 20090 found this helpful

Depending on what you want it to look like. We used bubble wrap on the walls and ceiling of my greenhouse. Because it has the air chambers it works amazingly. Cool in summer and keeps the warmth in winter.

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October 13, 20090 found this helpful

February 1, 2005 Flag
2 found this helpful

To stop cold air leaks from coming in your unused heat register vents just cut up one of those large magnetic calendars for your fridge. I got 3 covers from a Dollar Tree calendar.

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January 23, 2007 Flag
0 found this helpful

Last year I did an experiment. Would heating with an electric room heater in each room be more expensive than heating with my gas furnace? I found out the electric heaters are much more expensive than turning up my thermostat on my gas heater. So if you're chilly, you can forget the electric heaters, just turn up the thermostat 1-2 degrees.

More tips for keeping warm:

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January 23, 20070 found this helpful

Very good tips, Chuck! I wear long underwear and wool socks indoors; I am always nice and comfortable. My place of work is also cold so I wear long underwear to work too. At night, when watching tv and it is cold we have afghans to cover with.

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January 25, 20070 found this helpful

Being born/raised in TX, a most temperate climate,

when I traveled/moved with my ex-husband for years, regardless of what I wore, I could NOT get warm enough because my hands, nose, and lips were so affected by the cold air when living up North.

I count my blessings every minute that I don't have to suffer any longer now that I'm home again. God

bless those of you who have had to just get used to it, and who live all bundled up much of the year. Plan to come get warm for a few years down south.

Most folks who do seldom ever want to leave. lol

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January 26, 20070 found this helpful

January 22, 2007 Flag
Kelly Ann Butterbaugh0 found this helpful

A winter storm is quickly approaching and you listen to the roar of the furnace as it works to heat your home. With every cold snap you count pennies burning away in your home's heating system.

thermostat

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May 25, 2004 Flag
0 found this helpful

If you use fuel oil for heating, have your tank topped off now, the price will be more expensive when you need it in the heating season.

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September 26, 2005 Flag
0 found this helpful

Fall is a great time for a home-energy audit, and there are a surprising number of ways to save energy in your home without investing a major amount of money-or even time.

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March 22, 2011 Flag
0 found this helpful

I seldom turn up my house heat yet the cost is my biggest expense; how can I reduce it? (I've done all the obvious.)

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September 12, 2005 Flag
0 found this helpful

We have propane heat. Heating costs are suppossed to go up by 70% this year. What are simple things that we can do to save money but keep our home warm?

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