Good Dog For Apartment Living

I am looking for a dog for my home. I am single, with no kids and I work about 25 hrs a week. I never had a dog before but I've always wanted one. I need a small dog, preferably under 15 lbs. At least under 25 because of my apartment. What kind of dog do you guys recommend?

Bree from Belleville

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September 11, 20070 found this helpful

We just purchased a minature Dachshund this summer. I would think that this kind of dog would be good for apartment living. My puppy is 5 months old and weighs 7 pounds. The weight is not supposed to get much over 11 pounds.

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September 11, 20070 found this helpful

Most terrier mixes stay small and are very loyal dogs. good luck

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September 11, 20070 found this helpful

I would highly suggest a pug. Pugs are docile, love their people, are easy to train, great w/ children and adults alike, and are a great size. They are adorable dogs, whose personality and wimsical looks help them get whatever they want. I had a pug, Tucker, for 15 years, and will never again meet an all-around better dog. He knew "shake", "lay", "dance", "sit", "stay", "go for a walk", "bath" and the list goes on...and teaching him was nearly effortless. Pugs hang on your every word, and are so eager to please. They make perfect companions, and would thrive in a small, single-person environment. Good luck on your search!

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September 11, 20070 found this helpful

Bulldogs might weigh more than 25 pounds because they're so thick bodied but they're not very big. They are great apartment dogs because they're kind of lazy and don't need a lot of activity. They are very gentle, sweet-natured and affectionate.One problem, though -- some snore like the devil! Another good choice would be a Shih Tzu. A friend of mine had one for 20 years and I never once saw that dog move and he never made a sound. And please consider a female dog. They are smaller, cleaner, quieter, and less rowdy than males.

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

Whatever dog you decide to get, I hope you will go to the local humane society and see what they have available before you buy. You might find just what you're wanting, and at a much lower price than buying from a kennel. Also, you will be helping a dog who would be destroyed otherwise. I have two rescued dogs, and they are precious. I think they know they've been rescued! God bless you!

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

I have always had a Cavalier King Charles, they are great if you want to be active, but happy just to be with you if you don't, and adapt to your lifestyle very well. My current one is an ancient Blenheim called Elie, and she has had 2 litters of pups, and is a darling. I am single and work part time.

PS The picture is after her hair cut!

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

Each dog can be different, according to their personality. For example, one person said they knew a Shih-Tzu that was quiet, and many of them are. However, mine was a maniac and loved to bark (and I encouraged at times too, haha). One person said their pug was docile, and I'm sure it was, but my mother's pug would try to bite anyone that touched their paws.

In other words, please don't get your heart set on a particular breed because there are exceptions to every rule. I think your local humane society or rescue society may be your best move because they could help you find the dog you want with the right kind of temperament.

Good luck and please share pictures after your new pet comes to live with you. :-)

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

My sister is alone a great deal of the time as her husband works out of town three days a week. She got a Shih Tzu (sp?). It is small and weighs about 16-18 lbs. It is a good barking dog as far as strangers but extremely laid back otherwise. My sister works all day and Rupert stays in his cage until she gets home. I asked her what the dogs were originally bred for and found their purpose was to sit on the throne with rulers! So, it is not of the working dog class. It acts very royally and is not hyper. It's an easy dog for her to care for since she works and it's a good watch dog. We have a terrier mix, small but energetic. I wouldn't want to leave Buddy home alone all day. He needs exercise and lots of attention.

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

May I also suggest going to the local shelter?

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

i wouls also suggest the animal shelter. But first watch the dog shows on tv. in fact there is 1 on animal planet as i write this. go to the library. that is what i did. i read which breeds are my lving situation. then i talked to friends. you could also go to your local vet. you will need the vet anyway so get to know them before you need them.

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

I know the Dachschund is a good dog for indoors but I would suggest when you get one,get a friend for it ..a lonely dog will be miserable by its self..you'll have a happier dog with company..

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September 13, 20070 found this helpful

I'd suggest a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. We've had two, a male and a female. They're small, about 20 lbs at adulthood, love people, and can adapt to all sorts of living arrangements. We researched breeds for over a year before choosing corgis. We were military and moved alot and usually lived in apartment type quarters. These dogs will be couch potatoes or be very active when you want to be. I've met quite a few people that own corgis and have never heard of a "bad" corgi. They love being with their human. They have a life expectancy of about 15 years, so they're not a short term commitment. You won't regret it.

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September 14, 20070 found this helpful

I'm in an apartment and have 2 Pomeranians - 9 and 11 pounds - both rescued from shelters ( check out www.petfinder.com). Both are super sweet, and good "early warning" security. They would bark much more if allowed. Be aware that Poms have "small dog" syndrome - they think they're much bigger than they really are, and will be in charge if allowed. Mixed breed dogs can be great - both of mine were listed as Pomeranian mix, because there was no way to confirm a purebred status.

Look at different dogs - decide what age dog you'd like. Whether you want a puppy - fresh slate, no bad habits, lots of energy, small bladder, need lots of training and housebreaking - a young adult - not as hyper as a puppy, may be housebroken and have some training, but might have some bad habits or abuse issues - or a senior - usually very mellow, possible health problems - they all have lots of love to give and want to be loved. You will know when you meet "your" dog.

Good luck - Deb

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September 14, 20070 found this helpful

I have a Cardigan Welsh Corgi. Although a corgi is a little over your weight requirements, they are the BEST dogs! I agree with Casey...I've never met a bad corgi.

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September 14, 20070 found this helpful

Just make sure you don't leave the poor thing while you're working all day. Very hard on the dog to be in a kennel for long periods. Also, hard to housebreak if you're not there to take them out often.

I have noticed through my cleaning service that Dashunds, or chiuahas are most likely untrustworthy as far as housebreaking.

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September 14, 20070 found this helpful

I was also single and living alone when I first got my dogs. I'm very partial to terriers. My Lakeland terrier (about 15 pounds) was the best dog a human could hope for - smart, extremely healthy, so well-behaved I swear he was psychic, excellent with children and strangers, a great companion, protective of me but not excessively so, and most of all, he had a great sense of humor. He truly enjoyed going places and meeting people. I got him at the local humane society. His owners could no longer keep him. He was 6 when I got him and he lived to be 18-1/2.

My second terrier was a fox terrier mix (18-20 pounds) and she was a real sweetheart, the right dog at the right time for me. As I got older, so did she, and our walks got progressively slower. She was also very smart and healthy and active for many years. She was 2 when I got her and she died 2 months ago at age 17-1/2. I still miss her very much.

Most terriers do need a haircut every few months. I learned to trim them myself, and it wasn't a big deal. We made it fun.

Be sure you know the dog's behavior and medical history before you get to know the dog. Often they pick you, and then it's too late!

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September 14, 20070 found this helpful

I know this sounds crazy because this is not a small dog. Greyhounds make wonderful apartment pets. Rescue one from racing. They DO NOT need much exercise. They are couch potatoes. A five minute walk a day is all they need. They will go for longer walks if you so want but they don't need it. They are very loving and don't bark to bother your neighbors. They curl up into little balls for most of the day but look forward to any attention and loving you give. My daughter owns one and lives in a small townhouse with no yard. They don't require grooming like so many other small dogs do. Please consider saving one of these wonderful dogs from being destroyed. I've had three of them staying with me along with my own mutt for two weeks and it was not bother at all. I live in a small house.

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September 17, 20070 found this helpful

The best dogs I've ever owned are Boston Terriers. Try for a rescued adult, so the hyper puppyness is all gone. They are totally unique and loveable and will adore you more than you can imagine. You will love coming home to him or her! And 25 hours is a very reasonable amount of time to leave a dog as opposed to 40.

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September 17, 20070 found this helpful

I have owned three long-haired dachshunds; two I got from rescue organizations. My three have been between 12 and 17 lbs- I wanted 'portable." They are sweet, lovely, loyal little beasts and I recommend them highly. Try this website: www.drna.org; they have many wonderful dogs needing homes and are great to work with.

Good luck

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September 20, 20070 found this helpful

I love my doggies BUT the shih-tzu poodle mix loves to BARK loudly and at everything he still barks at ice cube dropping in freezer and doorbell been 4 months with him

he goes out to pee and barks at top of his lungs just for

sheer thrill, the yorkie is a barker

the jack russell is quiet, mellow happiest doggie

Ask at a shelter to make sure it is a good fit for you

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September 23, 20070 found this helpful

I have two Chinese crested hairless. Perfect temperament, small and love all the attention they can get. They use trays lined with pee pads when I'm out. Easy to feed and if hairless turns you off, then there's a coated version called a 'powderpuff'. Could never be without my girls, real head turners!

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October 16, 20070 found this helpful

This sounds absolutely nutty but Great Danes are really suited for apartment living!

for more info on these gentle giants Google- all about Great Danes.

you don't have to have a huge house or yard for these wonderful companion dogs to thrive!

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December 14, 20100 found this helpful

It sounds like you have a great opportunity to rescue an adult, possibly previously abused dog since you live by yourself and don't work full time. I hope you might at least consider it over a puppy.

Puppies in apartments can be tricky. They're messy, need to be confined somewhere without carpet, require at least intermittent attention throughout the day, and can be noisy. Abused dogs rarely bark, or at least mine don't (past and present). If you're interested, read up on the ways to help care for an abused dog and see if it's something you could do. It's really not that hard, mostly you just have to be patient and kind.

I have three little dogs, one of which was rescued from an abusive situation. She is the most appreciative, endearing dog I have ever met. She took a little bit of patience in the beginning, but its been so rewarding to watch her come out of her shell and become the dog she should have always been allowed to be. She's my constant companion, and I find it hard to imagine my life now if I had decided not to adopt her.

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