Waterless Stacked Cooking

Is it worth investing in this expensive cookware? Does the weight of all of these pots break the electric stove burners? Does stack cooking work?

Would this really make that much of an electricity savings?

Holly from Richardson, TX

Ad
Flag
May 8, 20070 found this helpful

We purchased a set of this type of cookware from a neighbor at an in-home demonstration in the 1970s in Atlanta, Georgia. Used the cookware many years, however I never found it useful for stacking to cook.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
May 9, 20070 found this helpful

Yes. Depends on the stove. If you do it all the time, but most people won't.

We bought our set in the late 80's. The biggest money saver is that you're not buying piece after cheap piece. One pot may be $50 there but $10 at the cheepo store, but if you have to replace the broken handle, chipping teflon, dented thin metal pan 5 times you're at even money. I was going through cheaper stuff fast, 20 years later I see the long term savings.

Plan carefully, think long term and everyday. I didn't buy a big roasting pan from them. How often do you really use it? I paid a medium price for that somewhere else. But the two frying pans get used a lot. When all three of the kids are home out comes the big one. But when it's just us and the youngest, the smaller works fine. We got a pie plate with our set, I hardly ever use it, just don't like the way pie comes out,prefer my glass plates. Someone else may love thiers.

I don't think I've done the stack cooking ever.

Make very sure you know all the terms before you buy. More pieces are not better if you never use them. And if the dealer says "oh don't worry about that, I'll take care of it" with out showing you in writing that it's taken care of, show them the door. If they are not willing to explain even the smallest of question about the contract, they will not offer you any post signing customer service.

Hope this helps, happy cooking!

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
May 10, 20070 found this helpful

I absolutely love my stainless steel waterless cookware. My husband and I bought a set right after were married in 2003. The only problem was I was 59 when we married. However, I wish I'd bought it years and years ago. One thing to remember is when doing regular cooking, never use heat higher than medium, and when you hear the steam, turn the burner to low. Sometimes when I do fried potatoes or french fries, though, it does require a higher heat.

I rarely use the waterless feature as I'm still not quite comfortable with it, but I do find myself using less water than I did before. Not that there's anything wrong with water, but they are considered "waterless" cookware.

The best thing about the cookware is its longevity and how nice it still looks years later. I use Barkeeper's Friend and they still look brand new. And it is the most easy to keep clean that I've ever found - and I've used aluminum, iron and glass in the past. I absolutely love stainless steel best though. I also love that as you remove hot food from the pans, they can be immediately immersed in hot water. The burnt-on food just runs off with water and only a little scrubbing. I have a glass-top stove and have had no problems at all.

I'm not sure that you need to buy the door-to-door kind though. I have a stainless steel sauce pan (very heavy) that I bought at Wal-Mart and I like it just as well. So you might be able to find a really nice set at Dillards or Macy's for much less cost-wise. It's worth a look.

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
May 10, 20070 found this helpful

I absolutely love my stainless steel waterless cookware. My husband and I bought a set right after were married in 2003. The only problem was I was 59 when we married. However, I wish I'd bought it years and years ago. One thing to remember is when doing regular cooking, never use heat higher than medium, and when you hear the steam, turn the burner to low. Sometimes when I do fried potatoes or french fries, though, it does require a higher heat.

I rarely use the waterless feature as I'm still not quite comfortable with it, but I do find myself using less water than I did before. Not that there's anything wrong with water, but they are considered "waterless" cookware.

The best thing about the cookware is its longevity and how nice it still looks years later. I use Barkeeper's Friend and they still look brand new. And it is the most easy to keep clean that I've ever found - and I've used aluminum, iron and glass in the past. I absolutely love stainless steel best though. I also love that as you remove hot food from the pans, they can be immediately immersed in hot water. The burnt-on food just runs off with water and only a little scrubbing. I have a glass-top stove and have had no problems at all.

I'm not sure that you need to buy the door-to-door kind though. I have a stainless steel sauce pan (very heavy) that I bought at Wal-Mart and I like it just as well. So you might be able to find a really nice set at Dillards or Macy's for much less cost-wise. It's worth a look.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
May 10, 20070 found this helpful

I'm curious about the stack part of the waterless cookware. No one has come to my door selling. Saw it at the State Fair being demonstrated and always wondered if it was all that great. It's certainly expensive enough.

Am currently using Wolfgang Puck cookware, which I like very much, but what brought this up was the fact that my favorite frying pan, an Ultrex from HSN (this line has been discontinued by HSN), couldn't be cleaned after buring high protein pancakes. I tried everything. And when that failed, even used oven cleaner. Never had this severe a problem with Ultrex before - I was surprised, to say the least. This didn't work either. Weeks later, the big high heat burner went out on my stove, I ordered a replacement burner, and it's not working because something else broke when the burner (3000+ watts) blew. I ordered the schematics from the manufacturer. Dh wants to fix it, but has (as usual) been too busy and keeps on telling me to hold off until he gets to it because, "no one can fix things as well as I can."

So now I am down to one 'big' burner and 3 smalls for a stove. And that big burner is kind of slow (as are the small ones). And all of this adds up to my thinking that stack cooking might help and keep me from getting on Dh's case (who works plenty hard and has very little free time). And, in addition, could save energy.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
May 10, 20070 found this helpful

we bought a set in the 70"s from an in house demo person, invite friends over for a dinner demo. I used them for years , never really liked them as much as I thought I would. Didn't fess up to it though, the expense involved plus the fact that we were broke and my husband graciously bought them for me as a Christmas present, I used them much longer than I would have like to. Finally got a set of pampered chef elite cookeware, hard adonized. I love them!! Oh my gosh! Nothing sticks and i can hang the pans with the lids on one hook together.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

Add your voice! Click below to comment. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

Related
Categories
Food and Recipes Food Tips Cooking TipsMay 7, 2007
Guides
A carved turkey breast.
Cooking a Turkey Breast in the Microwave
Cooking a Turkey in Your Oven, A turkey in the oven.
Cooking Ham and Turkey in the Same Oven
Coconuts
Cooking With Coconut Oil
Cooking bacon in microwave.
Cooking Bacon in the Microwave
More
🎄
Christmas Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
You are viewing the desktop version of this page: View Mobile Site
© 1997-2016 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on November 23, 2016 at 1:55:38 PM on 10.0.2.49 in 2 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
Loading Something Awesome!