Make Your Own Garden Paths

After my home site was cleared, I was left with a large area in the back which was filled with mud after every rain. Before I installed zoysia sod, I decided to make paths leading to several areas I plan to landscape with shrubs, flowers, and vegetables. The paths would be rather long (150 feet) and it would be very expensive to finish them with cement.

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I installed landscape edging making the paths about 4 feet wide. I then purchased 5 yards of crush and run ($181.00) and had it delivered. I made a tamper with a flat piece of wood and a pole. I completed 4 foot areas at a time by placing the crush and run, sprinkling it well with water, and tamping it down. The finished path looks like it was poured with concrete - only it was done at a fraction of the cost of cement. Anyone can do this - I'm a 62 year old lady and I did it myself!

By Miss Daisy from Waverly Hall, GA

Anyone Can Make Their Own Garden Paths
May 8, 20080 found this helpful

Looks very nice, I'm inspired to consider that material for my own bare back yard!

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May 8, 20080 found this helpful

That looks great. I am impressed! Wondering what the sunken cinder blocks are for? Possibly another great idea? Thanks

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May 10, 20080 found this helpful

Is this crushed stone you are talking about?

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May 10, 20080 found this helpful

That looks great! What is "Crush & Run"? I don't know the material type you used.

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May 11, 20080 found this helpful

Please clarify what crush and run is. I like the idea and as a 50 year old man, I applaud your efforts and would like to do this myself. Thank you

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May 11, 20080 found this helpful

In response to the question, "what is crush and run"? It is a mixture of different size gravel. There are some pieces as large as a golf ball; however, most of it is crushed gravel. It is commonly used to establish driveways and is great at decreasing erosion in difficult areas.

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May 25, 20080 found this helpful

This looks great I think I will give it a try.

Thanks for posting this.

Liz

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