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Using an Iron-on Transfer

An easy and fun way to decorate clothing and home decor items is to use iron-on transfers. You can use either ones you have created yourself or ones purchased at your local craft store. This is a guide about using an iron-on transfer.

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May 13, 2016 Flag
4 found this helpful

I wanted my own personal tee shirt without the cost of company mark up. At Michael's they have tee shirts on sale often, for $2.99 each. They also carry iron on transfers for the tee shirts, (3 sheets per pack). You can make at least 3 tees with 1 package. So I wanted to try my hand at this new craft.

Designing A Tee Shirt With Iron On Transfer

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January 15, 2008 Flag
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Is there any way to use a picture colored with crayons as an iron on transfer for say an apron or t-shirt

Belinda from Wingo, KY

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January 15, 20080 found this helpful
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I don't know about using a page of something colored. I do know you can use the cheapest crayons you can buy and have perfect fabric crayons at a much lower price. Just color your own design on the apron and iron it with a sheet of plain paper between iron and fabric. if it is going to be washed often iron it with a sheet on cut rite wax paper over it. This can even be bleached. Remember to use cheap wax crayons the crayola crayons do not work.

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January 15, 20080 found this helpful
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There are crayons that are specifically for making iron on transfer. Just go over the drawing with the crayons. These can be found in the sewing section at JoAnn Fabrics or the craft section at Wal-Mart. They are really easy to use. Hope this helps.

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January 16, 20080 found this helpful
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I have done this lots of times by having the kids draw on fine sandpaper with any crayons-remember that any pic drawn will be reversed when used as a transfer so any words need to be written backwards if you want them to read right. Don't know what the reason for the sandpaper is. Make sure the crayon is drawn thickly, and wash separately the first few times.

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February 3, 20090 found this helpful

Yeah, but what is that called? Thanks.

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February 7, 2010 Flag
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How do you repair iron-on transfers that are peeling off?

By Tracy from Indianapolis, IN

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October 30, 20080 found this helpful
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Use fusible webbing....Pellon works the best! This is used to adhere fabric to fabric. The instructions are on the Pellon. Hope this works for you!

Elaine

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February 15, 20100 found this helpful
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Consider using a sewing machine set on satin stitch. The satin stitch could be used to create a border around the entire picture. Or use the sewing machine set on a zig-zag stitch. This stitch could also be done by hand. Karen

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July 16, 2009 Flag
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I have some iron-on transfers or very colorful fake tattoos, I don't know which. I tried applying them to some bare wood trinket boxes first by rubbing them like you would a window transfer, then by ironing. They stuck moderately well, but the backing won't come off. When I tug at it the picture comes up from the wood surface.

I just pulled one off. It's a very detailed Chinese dragon. It is a little tacky, as though there's some sort of gum on the surface and it left a little residue on the box. If it's supposed to be peeled off first and applied that way, I can't seem to start an edge.

There are streaming cloud trails, whiskers, ears and other delicate parts to it that would be easily damaged if I am not careful. Has anyone worked with these things before? How do I get them free of their backing, which is a stiff white cardstock?

By nekocat from OR

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July 17, 20090 found this helpful
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You could try wetting it again and lightly rubbing the paper off. It will crumb off. I done this method with a paper to clay image transfer. Be extra careful when the image starts to appear.

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July 24, 20090 found this helpful
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You have to thoroughly wet the backing for about 30 seconds and then use a damp sponge to smooth out the design after transfer.

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August 31, 2008 Flag
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How do I keep iron-on transfers from sticking to the protective cover? We used waxed paper and then a cotton tablecloth when they stuck to the waxed paper. Is my iron too hot?

Ann from Lee's Summit, MO

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September 2, 20080 found this helpful
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If you are copying them from the Computer to a printer you need to reverse the image so that the backing is facing up and that the transfer is down next to the cloth. I keep forgetting to do that myself and yep it sticks to the iron. What a mess!

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September 3, 20080 found this helpful
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Thanks for your response. We did have it facing up, and the transfer did stick to the shirt. Unfortunately, it also stuck to the waxed paper that I tried first and then to the cotton table cloth that I tried the next time.

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February 9, 2015 Flag
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After I tried ironing on the transfer with the highest heat, I noticed it was not sticking. So I used steam. Now I read NOT to use steam. Can I still use this transfer? It is not totally sticking to my shirt.

By Phyllis T.

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February 10, 20150 found this helpful

Iron the transfer once more to make it adhere as much as possible to the shirt. Let cool. Stitch around the border by hand with small running stitches, treating it like an applique. The sewn on transfer will stay on the shirt. Hope this helps.

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February 15, 20150 found this helpful

What is the fabric-fibre type of the shirt you're trying to fuse an iron-on transfer to? If it's got too high a synthetic fibre content an iron-on transfer meant for cotton only fabrics won't fuse. Likewise the transfer won't take if the shirt has been stained with oil or grease - you may not be able to see the stain but it's embedded in the fibres which are resisting the transfer.

Also a possible problem is the shirt may still be loaded with mill-sizing and the sizing hasn't been completely washed out of the shirt fabric yet. Run the shirt through the wash without detergent - open the top-load or look through the window during an agitation cycle and you'll likely see suds - that's the excess sizing from the fabric mill! Wash until there is no sudsing on an agitation cycle then try your transfer again.

Textile mills use sizing (sprayed on, it's kind of like starch) to make fabrics hold a shape and look more attractive. Adding to that mill applied sizing, garment factories often put finished garments through yet more sizing sprays to make the garment hold its shape and look attractive. And then they label the garment 'dry clean' only so you don't wash the sizing out and discover you've spent a lot of money on a shapeless blob of cotton or rayon. Happens all too often, and is why more and more people are turning to home garment sewing again.

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January 22, 2015 Flag
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I just came across a few transfers that I got a few years ago when the Patriots were in the Superbowl. Now that they are headed again I would like to use these, but when I tried to iron one on it didn't take at all. Do these only last so long? They have been in a thick envelope for a few years and look perfect. What am I doing wrong?

By Sue

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January 22, 20150 found this helpful

Everything in life has an end date. The medium on your transfers was not made to last like Egyptian mummies. It may last awhile but not more than a year or two, I would guess.

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January 26, 20150 found this helpful

The transfer ink on iron-on transfer does indeed evaporate after a few years in storage - even the best storage.

For under a fiver you can restore those transfers by using a fresh new transfer pen, carefully tracing the transfer, then immediately ironing onto the fabric.

Be sure to buy the type of transfer pen that can be used with an iron - some pens disappear with heat application and that's not what you want! Any good hobby or sewing shop will have the right pen, ask a staff member for help so that you go home with the right thing:)

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October 7, 2011 Flag
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I have just done my first iron-on transfer. Some of the paper is stuck to the transfer. What can I do to remove it? Did I try to take it off too soon? I waited until it was just warm to the touch. Or did I wait too long? It was about 3-4 minutes after pressing.

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