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Clipping Dog's Nails?

Does anyone have any tips on how to successfully cut your dog's toenails? I can't get my dogs to sit still when trying to cut their nails and they don't like me touching their paws.

By StellBell

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May 3, 20110 found this helpful

I have a Pitbullmix and have the same problem. I solved it by cutting hers with a pair of toenail clippers. About every 2 weeks I just cut her tips of, and over time she got used to it Now I don't have any more problems. I wish you good luck.

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May 4, 20110 found this helpful

I recommend you use specialized clippers... I use reptile or bird clippers, they have a roundish cutting surface or it hurts the animal less. As far as them letting you do it. You eaither need someone to help you force them til they get used to it or give them some kind of sedative to relax them.... You can administer things like valium, xanax & most other relaxants, in EXTREMELY small doses. (go by their weight for that) or if that is not possible, your vet could give you something.

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May 4, 20110 found this helpful

I have two large dogs. I do their toenails at night when they are tired and sleepy. My male is easier to do than my female. (I had to prove to her that I was alpha. I had to gently pin her down until she stopped fighting me and relaxed.) My vet told me a way that helps, but it takes two people. One person sits behind the dog's shoulders (while the dog is lying down) with their leg over the dog's head/neck area. That same person holds the dog's bottom leg (the front leg against the ground) just above the dog's elbow and lifts that leg up somewhat. This restrains the dog without hurting them.

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May 4, 20110 found this helpful

I had an Alaskan Malamute that at 6 months weighed over 80 pounds. As a puppy, she was spent a lot of time in the basement with concrete floor and walls. She was very active and that kept her nails short. Of course, there were gouges in the concrete block stone wall near where she played with her toys. When she started spending more time in the main living area, I knew I had to start trimming her nails. In preparation, I spent a bit of time every day just handling her paws. The first few nail trimming sessions were a struggle. I actually got on top of her, holding her body down with mine - shoulder to shoulder, knees on each side of her hips. I reached around her neck to hold her paw in one hand using the clippers in the other. I spoke softly to her as I clipped each nail. By the time she was a year old and weighed 30 pounds more than me, I was able to trim her nails without a struggle and without holding her down. I did not use the popular guillotine style nail trimmer. I found one for large dogs that looked much like the garden trimmer used to trim small tree branches. I still use that nail trimmer today on a 27 pound dog & it works great! Get a quality trimmer and take care of it. Spend some happy time getting your furry friend used to having their paws handled. Use a bright light to help finding how short to trim the nails. Good Luck!

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