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Use a Spray Or Mister Bottle for Cooking Oils

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Save lots of money by simply putting your own oil into a mister bottle, and using it to spray on pans and waffle irons, instead of paying for the canned stuff! Far cheaper and healthier for you!

Waffles are often overlooked as inexpensive but wonderful food to eat. Some folks object to the waffle batter sometimes overflowing and causing a mess; however, simply place the waffle iron on a cookie sheet. If it happens to overflow, the clean up is incredibly easy.

If you buy the Krusteaz brand mix, all you need to add is water, then you can save your milk and eggs for another meal. You can get not only buttermilk flavor, but wheat and honey, blueberry, buckwheat, oat bran, and apple, etc.

By MzScarlett from Medford OR

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Archive: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Make your own cooking spray by pouring canola oil into a clean spray bottle. It's much cheaper and does the same thing as canned cook sprays. You can do the same thing with olive oil for spraying steamed veggies, bread or fish.

Source: From a friend who sends me "Helpful Hints".

By Elaine from Iowa


RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Hi Elaine, I have never thought of doing this and it is a great tip. Thank you for posting it. So much cheaper than buying store cooking sprays. (04/09/2008)

By Arizona Survivor

Archive: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

I purchased a plastic spray bottle from the dollar store and filled it with my favorite extra virgin olive oil. This has saved me a lot of money on the spray cans of non stick cooking spray. Not only is it a convenient spray for skillets, fry pans, baking dishes, or just spraying meats before adding your favorite spices. I do believe it saves me calories, too! My husband likes to use it on the grill.

Source: My own idea! When I ran out of cooking spray and did not have any coupons for the canned cooking spray, I stopped at the dollar store for a few other items and saw the spray bottles for a dollar and thought why not try my own cooking spray. :)

By Bobbie from Rockwall


RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

This sounds like a good idea--but has anyone had any trouble with the sprayer clogging up? (12/23/2008)

By teddygirl

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Cooking stores and bed bath and beyond type stores. Sell a bottle that's made for spraying oil. Its called a oil mister, it's about $10.

Frugal living on about.com rated it as one of their favorite frugal kitchen gadgets.

I have one and love it! (12/24/2008)

By mrsdawn

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Looks like good idea! Can we get it in all the shops? (12/30/2008)

By sean08

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Hi, I had used this for a couple years, went back to the other direction. Maybe my time and disability made the decision.

Anyway, Pampered Chef has the sprayers, and you pump air into them to infuse the oil out like a spray can. Fine, difficult to clean. I found my oils went bad faster, I don't use oils a lot. And my olive oil had to be in fridge, which made it not ready when I needed to use it. It is fine to fill and use as a single event (fundraiser spaghetti dinner at church, loaded it with OO and was a breeze to keeping things running nice on the food line being spritzed.

The PC bottle was a little bigger and meant for oils, but even that was a pain to keep clean. Since mold and bacteria grow many places, and if it is a high use item, you want to empty and clean it regularly.

So for me and my little use of sprays, I am back to the canola or olive oil spray can.

Simply mixing your OO and flavored vinegars, etc for dressings is another good use. (01/05/2009)

By TandT Grandma

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Good idea. Obviously Pampered Chef's would be, but I would check to make sure that the plastic is food-grade. (01/05/2009)

By Maryeileen

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

Make sure you use safe plastic. Look for the number inside a triangle, usually on the bottom of the bottle.

I got this from the internet, site unknown.

Spotting the "Safer" Plastics

#1 (PETE): Polyethylene terephthalate ethylene Used for water, soda, juice, and shampoo bottles; some detergents; peanut butter containers.

#2 (HDPE): High-density polyethylene. Used for opaque milk and water jugs, bleach and detergent bottles; cleaning product containers; plastic bags.

#4 (LDPE): Low-density polyethylene. Used for plastic wrap, grocery store bags, some baby bottles.

#5 (PP): Polypropylene Used for some food containers; plastic squeeze bottles.

#7 (PLA): Polylactic acid and other bio-based plastics made from soy, corn, potatoes, and wheat. Used for deli-take out food containers, cold beverage cups, straws, disposable cutlery, food wraps, and bags.

The "Unsafe" Plastics

Plastics coded #3 (PVC), #6 (PS) and #7 (Other) are the plastics to steer clear from. They all contain known or suspected carcinogens seriously detrimental to human health. Ironically, these plastics are also usually not recycled.

Spotting "Unsafe" Plastics

#3 (PVC): Polyvinyl chloride or vinyl chloride Used for plastic cling wrap; to hold cooking oils and cleaning products; for plastic squeeze bottles, children's toys (banned or restricted in several European countries), water pipes, and phonographic records.

#6 (PS): Polystyrene Used in Styrofoam carryout containers and opaque disposable cutlery.

#7 (Other) Usually PC, Polycarbonate (the plastic containing BPA recently in the news)

Hard plastics used for baby bottles and "sippy" cups, 5-gallon water jugs, sports water bottles, metal can liners.

Dos and don't for Using Plastics More Safely

DON'T mix hot foods and plastic. Never serve hot food or drink from plastic containers, and always allow food to cool down before transferring it to a plastic container, or covering it with plastic wrap.

DON'T microwave food or beverages in plastic containers, or covered in plastic wrap (this is true even of for plastics labeled "microwave safe".

DON'T allow plastic wrap to come in direct contact with your food (especially fatty foods).

DO toss out old, scratched plastic containers. These can leach chemicals more readily into food and drink.

DO wash plastic containers by hand using a soft sponge. The hot water and detergents used by dishwashers can break down plastics, which increases their ability to leach chemical additives.

DO switch to glass or stainless steel containers as plastic containers wear out. (01/06/2009)

By cookwie

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

I have tried two different food-safe plastic bottles and it didn't work out for me. One wouldn't spray at all, the other only sprayed in a stream. Both bottles were new and did work with water.

I recently read when your are finished using the pump-air type bottles, you should release the oil in the tube by holding it upside and spray to discharge the excess oil plus expel the pressure by unscrewing it. (05/05/2009)

By mkymlp

RE: Use a Spray Bottle for Cooking Oils

I posted this topic or one very similar awhile back (can't recall exactly when.) My sister suggested this to me because, being visually impaired, it's hard for me to pour a consistent amount of oil into the pan.

The stream I get from my little spray bottle never bothers me, as long as I get what I want, I'm none too picky, lol! (05/07/2009)

By JustPlainJo