Neutered Dogs Fighting With Each Other Around Females in Heat

Can 2 neutered male dogs get along? I have 2 Dachshunds, a father and son. Dad got fixed when Jr. was about 6 months old (about 6 months ago). They got along very well, until just recently. It was Jr.'s turn to get fixed. He came home to 4 female Dachshunds in heat. Now dad and Jr. can't be left alone without all out war, not even with supervision in the same room. Will it get better after the females are out of heat? We tried introducing them again slowly, it went sniff, sniff, growl, bite. Any suggestions?

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By funluvn1966

January 31, 20110 found this helpful

How about getting those female dogs spayed. There are too many unwanted dogs in this world for you to be adding more. That would solve every problem.

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January 31, 20110 found this helpful

I think the testosterone is still in the dogs system for awhile. More importantly why haven't the girls been spayed?? Other males are going to come calling. Please don't litter.

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Anonymous Flag
January 31, 20110 found this helpful

Just because males are neutered doesn't mean that their male scent instinct doesn't work! It's a male dog response to vie for what they think is territory. Personally, I think you're playing with fire because sometimes when animals, and humans, begin to not get along it can be irreversible. If these are pets that you truly love why don't you simply have the females spayed to nip any further mishaps in the bud? If not, find new homes for all of them. I personally don't understand why people don't have all of their 'pets' spayed and neutered because, as Marfette said that 'there are already too many unwanted' and I'll add that includes pedigreed pets and too many usually end up unwanted for human convenience/inconvenience. :-(

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January 31, 20110 found this helpful

Why don't you just get the females fixed? There are so many animals in the pounds being gassed, heart stuck and killed everyday.

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January 31, 20110 found this helpful

Strange you have four females in season at the same time for god's sake de-sex them was your veterinarian aware of this when the young dog was castrated. Are you a breeder who should know better.

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February 1, 20110 found this helpful

Hello. Are you kidding? Common sense will tell you that you must spay the females! Are you a breeder? If so, you should know better. Please have all your dogs. spay/neutered so they can live a happy life. Call your Veterinarian ASAP and make those appointments. There are too many unwanted animals in this world. Do the right thing and it will make you happy.

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February 1, 20110 found this helpful

There are approximately 45 cats and dogs for every person born. Only 1 out of 10 dogs born ever get a home. Only 1 out of 12 cats born ever find a home. Approximately 800 dogs & cats are killed each hour in the United States, because there are not enough homes for them!

Please spay and neuter!

If looking for a pet, please rescue instead of buying from a breeder or a pet store

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February 3, 20110 found this helpful

No, I am not a breeder! And why all the hostility?

All of our dogs are inside dogs, we simply had more females than males so we got the males fixed. Why go to the risk and cost of unnecessary surgery for the females if they never go out? I came here for help and you guys slit my throat before I could even defend myself. I'm taking care of business, get off my back and if you have nothing helpful to say as an answer to my question, please refrain from taking up space.

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Anonymous Flag
February 3, 20110 found this helpful

With all sincere due respect, funluvn1966, when you ask for help and advice you might not like everyone's answers but the common answer here was to have your females spayed to solve the problem you're having. If you read my first comment again you'll see where I mentioned that behavior sometimes can't be reversed unless you take care of the problem and the problem is that the males still 'smell the scent' and it's going to continue to happen every time any of the females come into heat. It doesn't matter how long the males have been neutered. They will always have the scent instinct. I know this from personal experience as an owner of pets for almost forty years.

No one was trying to slit your throat here but rather to make a point that beloved pets should be spayed and neutered and for numerous reasons. If your two males emotional health are important to you, and the health of your females too because it's been studied and found that females that are not spayed at a young age have more chances of health problems, then you'll spend the money to have the females spayed. If you can't afford complete healthcare (emotional and physical) then perhaps you truly shouldn't have so many pets which includes purebreds?

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February 4, 20110 found this helpful

Dear Funluvin. I can understand you feeling like everyone is dumping on top of you like a ton of bricks, so I'm not going to add any further comment. Just to tell you of my own experience, but with my cat and in kind of a reverse situation. She, a beautiful dark grey came to me as a tiny kitten, and when she was three months old I had her spayed. To my horror at the next 'heat' time, all these male tomcats came calling and squalling around, I rang my vet.. and asked 'What is going on here>! She said it takes some time for the scent of the female to dissipate even after they have been spayed, and it should be okay the next time, and it was. no more trouble with the boys calling around. So, I think it may be the same with your male dogs, a while before they settle. You could ring your vet and ask for advice on it.

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February 5, 20110 found this helpful

Aside from eliminating the problem with the males, spaying the females will spare them from possible, and all too common, female problems as they age. Unspayed females frequently develop uterine tumors and other problems, and being in heat twice a year is agitating for them. So, it really is a kindness to them to spay them. Perhaps there's a vet than will offer you a discount for having more than one pet? My vet does this. You might also look into the possibility of a low-cost spay-neuter clinic nearby. Check with humane animal societies in your area. Please don't feel dumped on - everyone replying here is a real animal lover, and has had experience with their own animals, and sincerely cares about the welfare of your pets.

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