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Incubating Duck Eggs

Category Ducks
This guide is about incubating duck eggs. If you don't have a broody mother duck, an incubator can help you hatch poultry eggs.
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By 0 found this helpful
May 11, 2016

I was incubating three duck eggs in the sun. I checked after thirty minutes and I felt the egg. It was a bit hot. Not that hot, but it's like just a bit hot. I quickly transferred the three eggs to another cool dry place. Will the ducklings inside the egg die? I hope not.
Please give me helpful answers.

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May 12, 20160 found this helpful
Best Answer

Please do not attempt to incubate eggs by using the sun or any other means besides an incubator set to the proper temperature and humidity levels. The warmth of the sun may start development of the ducklings, but inconsistencies in temperature will cause them to die. Incubation is a very exacting process requiring precise temperature, regular turning of the eggs and proper moisture levels, especially for ducks. If these are wild duck eggs, it is also not lawful to possess them. Duck eggs that you find "abandoned" are usually just the beginning of a duck's nest before she has laid them all. The eggs are left exposed to the elements during this time and seem abandoned, but she will return once a day to lay another egg until she has a full clutch and will then begin incubating them. Removing eggs that she has already laid will disrupt the nesting process. It may be well-meaning to attempt to hatch them on your own, but is doomed to failure without the proper equipment and knowledge.

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By 0 found this helpful
January 1, 2016

My two female ducks just started laying in the coop. It is winter in Kansas. I would like to gather them and put them in an incubator to hatch. However, by the time I get to the coop in the mornings to gather the eggs they are very cold.

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I immediately bring them into the house, but will they incubate and hatch since they were cold for several hours?

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April 8, 20160 found this helpful
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If you have a male duck, the eggs should be fertile. And, yes, the eggs if incubated before they are 7-14 days old should be viable. Being cold for several hours will not hurt them, unless they were frozen. A mother duck lays one egg each day for a week or two until she is satisfied with how many eggs she has. She will not sit on them until she is ready to incubate. During this time of egg laying the eggs are warmed and cooled by the duck coming and going and they are fine.

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By 0 found this helpful
May 10, 2017

I'm on day 27 of incubating mallard eggs. I've been turning them 1/2 turn, 3 times a day. Tonight I could hear them peeping a bit. I turned them about 40 minutes ago.

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Now I've just read that I should have stopped rotating two days ago! Should I turn them back or just leave them be? Will they hatch?

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May 11, 20170 found this helpful

i would leave them be-you could call your local humane society and ask a vet's opinion

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May 11, 20170 found this helpful

I agree. Leave them be and don't fret, nature will take its course now. Let us know how they are.

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May 11, 20170 found this helpful

Leave them alone. I think they will hatch soon.

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May 12, 20170 found this helpful

It is possible that some of them will hatch but probably not all of the chicks will survive. It seems the 25 days is a crucial time and eggs should not be turned after that - too bad you found this out too late but maybe you will still have good luck.

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Anonymous
May 12, 20170 found this helpful

One hatched and came out jumping around and super strong. Another one hatched early this morning and appeared very weak.

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He died a few hours later. Still waiting on 4 more...

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By 0 found this helpful
December 1, 2018

I am incubating duck eggs. Firstly I have an egg with two embryos in it. Any advise on the best course of action as I'd love them both to survive? Also should I spray and cool my eggs now? It's day 11, if so to what degree do I cool them down?

Thanks.

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December 2, 20180 found this helpful

According to this article, the eggs should be turned a minimum of 4 times a day. The temperature should be 99 degrees F and the humidity 84%. It should be kept like this for 25 days. I read nothing about cooking off the eggs day 11. Cornell university should have reliable information. ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/.../hatching.cfm

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December 3, 20180 found this helpful

First, the sad news, the chances of both "embryos" surviving is highly unlikely. There is barely enough room for one baby duckling in an egg once it reaches the halfway point in the incubation process. Next, are you candling the egg and seeing the yolk sac? The yolk is not the embryo. Eggs should be kept at about 99 degrees and moderate to high humidity, but only need to be turned twice a day as a minimum.

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You should not cool the eggs at all until the 28th to 30th day, generally, a good indicator is that you listen and when the peeping has become a pecking sound, the baby is trying to crack the shell. Your temp drop at that point should be no more than 5 degrees at most.

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December 4, 20180 found this helpful

Post back what happened. It is probably too late for any advice but I am praying for the eggs!!

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By 0 found this helpful
April 17, 2018

I have 2 female Muscovy ducks who are "free" in our barn (with other chickens). I would like to move some eggs the next time they lay and transfer them to an incubator.

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The incubator is at a school which is 30 minutes from my farm. How can I successfully move them? Keep them wrapped in a warm towel?

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April 17, 20180 found this helpful

A warm towel should keep them warm until you get there

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By 0 found this helpful
July 13, 2009

I have been incubating two ducks for 25 days. I know they both have something in them but how big should they look inside before they hatch?

By Becky from NJ

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July 13, 20090 found this helpful

When I was young, we also incubated eggs of all kinds. Usually, they completely filled the egg. You can also stick the egg next to a light or candle, and see how it looks inside.

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