RootingGardening

June Is Plant Rooting Month

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June is the best month for rooting most plants.
So, it's bragging time. No, it's tip time. Well, honestly, it's neither.
I'll tell you at the bottom what it actually is.
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First some pictures, (and maybe just a little bragging).

Picture one is of Royal Hustler ivy. It's a nice, low growing variety. I'm rooting lots to use as a ground cover under maple trees. I've stopped mowing under these trees because of the exposed roots. I don't care for the ivy's name, though. I always think of some con man trying to do an injustice to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth 2.

Picture two is of Golden Flame honeysuckle. This thing is beautiful. They can grow to become huge plants, covered with blooms from May til frost.

As shown in picture 2b, I am training these to be standards. They will have the shape of a small tree and I can put them about anywhere.

Picture three is of Euonymus Fortunei Emerald Gaiety. It seems there are two plants with this name. One is a winter creeper. Mine is the upright variety. I love it as a foundation planting, kept at about two feet. It looks as if it were a variegated boxwood.

Picture four is trailing lantana. I always take a few cuttings to keep over winter. In the spring, I put these cuttings in hanging baskets. More flowers for me, or for what I really enjoy...giving them away.

Picture five is of orange moss rose. Though near impossible to see, there are over 150 rootings here. They all came from two 6 cell packs purchased at half price. I will use these to plant a fifty foot border atop a small bank.

Picture six is of more impatiens cuttings and mum cuttings. With all the shady areas I have, the impatiens will come in handy. I may give many of them away. Incidentally, a note about the mum cuttings, these cuttings were taken from a 'garden variety' mum which I overwintered above ground in a pot. Most people believe the garden variety mum cannot successfully be overwintered. Don't you believe it. If you do try to overwinter one of these, you must provide excellent drainage lest the roots rot.

Picture seven, I kept for last. I won't tell you the name of this rose as it is patented. I accidentally broke a piece from the parent plant. Rather than throw it away (I would never do such a dastardly thing, patent or no), I rooted it.

What is a bit unusual about this rose stem rooting, is that I bought the parent plant this spring, broke the piece off this spring, and rooted that piece this spring. And now, late May, it has bloomed! This is a first for me, and People, you can believe me when I say, 'I am happy!

Now, as to the purpose of this post. It's not a tip nor a bragging post. It is to offer a word of encouragement. To those of you who would say 'I don't have a green thumb, I can't root anything', my reply is, 'Nonsense'!

I am no horticulturist, not even a master gardener. I have had no training, formal or otherwise, in plant propagation. All I have is a love for this ship and a love for much of the vegetation growing on it.

That love extends to sharing the more desirable species and their varieties. Just yesterday, I gave several large blackberry plants to a lady from West Virginia who answered my ad in Freecycle. The plants were blooming. Some were beginning to bear. She told me her sons loved her homemade blackberry jam. The look on her face when she saw the size of the plants brought me a feeling of pleasure money can't buy.

Most of you wouldn't want to propagate on a large scale, but if you have a favorite African violet you'd like to root, or as in the case of the lady from West Virginia, a rose bush that belonged to her great, great grandparents, I say 'It can be done'. There is no more pleasure than in giving someone a plant and saying, ' I rooted this just for you'.

So, be a little patient. Each plant has it's own unique set of requirements for rooting. These must be learned. Expect trial and error. Read online. Ask the advice of friends. Call your local ag agent. And you can always ask a question right here on ThriftyFun. You're sure to get a number of replies with what works best for each person answering.

Root Y'all!

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June 9, 20160 found this helpful

I didn't know June was Plant Rooting Month. I've already done some rooting. I cut branches from the neighbor's pear tree, our apple tree and lilac bush.
They're all coming along fine. I thought rooting time was over! I'll be cutting more tomorrow.
Thank you!

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June 11, 20160 found this helpful

Well, April, know this. If your neighbor prunes his/her pear tree this Fall, or if you prune your apple tree or lilac bush this Fall, you can root those pruned cuttings over Winter. You read right. That's not a typo. Here's how you do it.

https://deepgre  rdwood-cuttings/

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June 13, 20160 found this helpful

Be careful planting ivies under the maple trees that the ivies don't climb the trees. Some ivies can strangle branches, or completely smother the crown, or stop the tree from breathing. If the Maples are Norway Maples, the shade may be too intense for even ivies to grow. Raising the crown (i.e. removing some of the lower branches) can bring more light to the ground and allow the growth of low growing shade tolerant ground covers - not grass, that never need cutting.

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Exposed roots usually indicate a shortage of water, and the roots are growing near the surface to get what little water is available., Healthy root growth is in the ground, wherein the roots receive about an inch of water a week during the growing season.

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June 15, 20160 found this helpful

Thanks, Brent

But these 100 year old trees are already covered with ivy, and I love it. I do keep the ivy thinned, and I maintain a high canopy to the trees.

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June 3, 20170 found this helpful

One year later. Come to think of it, Brent, I don't know of any Maple that wont eventually bring some of it's roots to the surface no matter how much water it gets. I planted some Autumn Blaze maples. I kept them well watered year round except during dormancy. In three years, they were huge and had already begun exposing their roots. It's the nature of Maples to do this.

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July 24, 20160 found this helpful

I wasn't able to show you a good picture of the 150 orange moss rose rootings, so here is a picture of them, now. 60 feet of border for less than $2.

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June 3, 20170 found this helpful

What a gorgeous border! It may have only cost $2.00 but it was still a lot of work - pleasurable but still time and work.

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Stand back and admire your work as I am sure many passersby do also.

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June 6, 20170 found this helpful

Thank you

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June 5, 20180 found this helpful

I love your passion and respect for these plants!
Nurturing them feels so good, doesn't it?
Read Lab Girl or The Hidden Life of Trees if you want to learn mind blowing insights about nature's incredible ways.
Thank you.

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June 5, 20180 found this helpful

When I moved into my house, years ago, a neighbor was cutting down a regular box hedge that bordered our property and he left some of the clippings on my driveway.

I had been wanting a hedge to put in front of my porch to add some interest, but couldn't afford it.

I picked up his clippings and put 5 or 6 of them--1 each--in a 64 oz apple juice bottles filled with rain water and set them on my porch ledge, where they got the right kind of sun.

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One of them took getting a root ball fairly quickly and later that summer, I transplanted my new hedge in front of the porch.

To this day, it is lush and full and it cost me nothing but the time as I used the clipping, rain water (which I refilled any time it got low), the sun, and a recycled bottle as my root starter.

Mother Nature is awesome!!!

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June 14, 20180 found this helpful

I know which rose that you are talking about.It is the easiest one that I have ever found to root! It has even set bloom a few times after it had been set out to root,in about 2 months! I keep quite a few half gallon containers outside my back door to put my cuttings in,morning sun and evening shade,they love it! Shame we can't give the name!

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