Mr. Red (Hummingbird)

Photo Description
This is one of our favorite hummingbirds, Mr Red, because he's the friendliest little guy of all the hummingbirds, I've ever seen.

Of course hummers love to guard their feeders, and this one wanted his cake and to eat it too by guarding the feeder but was too tired to stay awake.

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He's got yellow pollen all over his bill from all the flowers, and probably wanted a drink of nectar (sugar water) before he went on to pollinating the other flowers by seeking nectar from them, and he was just as content as a hummer could be, that he fell asleep for awhile at one of his favorite feeders before his job was done.

I've only seen one other hummingbird over the many years I've fed them, take a nap.

We had one little hummer we'd cared for overnight in our house (with the guidance of a licensed professional) and that little guy actually slept upside down (like a bat) all night long which really shocked us that they can, or do sleep like that.

It's pretty rare they fall asleep at a feeder, but, it happens :)

Photo Location
This picture was taken in our backyard in Las Vegas NV.

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July 5, 20180 found this helpful

What a great shot! Love that we can see the pollen on its bill.

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Reminds me of when I caught my late cat sneaking mustard off my plate. Adorable! Thanks for posting :)

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Anonymous
July 5, 20180 found this helpful

Oh goodness, I see my post actually posted (before yours).

I'm still not sure when I post after a comment, if I click on comment, or the reply, but I see now the difference it does make.

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July 5, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you Attosa :)

Years ago, when I first began hanging out feeders for
hummingbirds, I saw a few hummer with yellow on their bills,
and I wrote to several 'hummingbird experts' sending them a pictures too of the (yellow) on their bills - because I thought they might have some kind of fungal infection, isn't that silly, but, when I received letters back from them, is when I learned, it's only flower pollen, which is how I learned that one, hahaha

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And that's adorable about your kitty!

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July 5, 20180 found this helpful

Mr. Red, how cute you named him! I saw one last year at my feeder just a handful of times. They say they come back to the same feeder the next year. The feeder is out there, same place. Have not seen the bird, but that does not mean he has not visited, so I keep fresh food for it just in case. Omaha, N.E

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July 6, 20180 found this helpful

Adorable!!
A picture for your album for sure..
I have not seen many hummers this year but I keep fresh food
just in case I've missed them.
I also have a favorite but just named him "Bully" because he guards three feeders and I have to move them out of the site of his favorite.
He has found me 3 years in a row to say goodbye but he is late returning this year.
Thanks for posting photos and stories about your hummers.

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July 6, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you, and I'm so glad I can share these little guys with you all :)

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Every day these tiny beautiful birds make my day by just watching them.

This is a shaky, not so good video of Mr Red and how sweet he is by sharing his feeder with Bibs (we call her).

She's got red feathers under her chin, on her neck actually, which is how she got her name (Bibs) and she looks at Mr Red to see if it's okay for her drink from the feeder he's drinking at, and he allows her to share with him.
He's just as sweet and friendly as can be.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0KkvW2xgn8

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July 6, 20180 found this helpful

I was going to mention also that, hummingbirds really do come back to the same feeders year after year. They never forget.

I've read when hummingbirds drink the nectar from flowers, they remember which flowers they drank the nectar from, and will give those flowers a few days to "fill with nectar" again before they will try and eat from them again. They don't forget anything.

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We have 3 Black Chinned Hummingbirds also, which they're the only species we have here that fly to South America each year because Vegas will get too cold for them to stay (all the others stay) but not the Black Chins, and they stay in S. America for several months, then fly back to N. America.

Well, for 3 years now, the 3 Black Chin hummers leave and we miss them - but then 3 months later, there they are, looking in our window and drinking from their feeders again.

That to me is incredible that they remember where our backyard is after flying all those miles to, and from. It's totally amazing to see those 3 little ones after not seeing them for a few months.

Keep your feeders out, they will come back, or others will find them
and they'll sure be happy little birds knowing you've left food out for them.

And goodness do I know about the "backyard bully birds" hahaha, as now and then we'll have a hummingbird that will decide he wants it ALL, and then he'll chase everyone off because he'll want the entire backyard with all the feeders, and they'll do that until another challenges it, then the "backyard bully"

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will calm his jets, haha and allow everyone to eat again.

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July 6, 20180 found this helpful

I hope you will continue posting pictures and writing your stories as it is difficult to find very many people that have had the opportunity to experience these beauties up close and friendly.
It amazes me when I see one and think about your experiences as they are so tiny and precious.
I believe you have been blessed with an uncanny demeanor that makes hummers feel safe in your presence.
Thanks for sharing.

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July 7, 20180 found this helpful

Cybergrannie,

Thank you so much, and I'm very happy to share more.

It is really wonderful to experience a facet of life that I'd never
known before. I just didn't pay attention. And since I have, they've changed my life, and my husbands too. Every day we see something new of their behavior, amongst each other, and by themselves.
We sure love them. A day wouldn't be right without seeing them
or interacting with them.

I do feel that the more they see any person filling their feeders, the more they understand that, that person doesn't present any danger. It just takes a little time, as I remember years ago when we put out our first feeder. I think it took over an hour before
one got brave and curious enough to see what it was.

But shortly after consistent behavior from me going outside a few times a day, and either just touching their feeders or just standing by them for a min or two, they understood, and then the change we saw was when I'd fill the feeder again, there wasn't any delay in them zooming over as soon as I put the feeder up and walked away.

They knew then that me and the feeders were a good thing:)
Then in a short time after that, when I'd walk outside with a refilled feeder, they'd start drinking right out of the feeder port hole, even before I'd get it hung up again. I'd freeze in whatever position I was in holding the feeder or feeders, just so they could drink with knowing, that's okay too, and it just tickled me for days just of the thought of them doing that.

And yes, they sure are all so precious and tiny. I look at each one sometimes when they sit on the feeder or even my finger and am still amazed at every little tiny feather on them, and how beautiful each one is, and I wonder what they're thinking too, hehe because they're only the length of my finger from head to tail, (a whole bird is this tiny) haha - that's what I say to myself as they're incredible to me too, but I think how wonderful it is to have them trust someone who's a zillion times bigger, and that feels so good too.

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July 8, 20180 found this helpful

This is little Ali, and she's a female Black Chinned hummingbird.
She likes getting little sips of the fountain water. They're like little
drones, being able to maneuver in every direction, they can even fly upside down.

They all enjoy the fountain drinking and bathing, which hummingbirds are more prone to drink and bathe in running water more than just a pool of water, and it almost seems (and maybe is) that they know under normal circumstances, that running water may be cleaner than stagnant water would be.

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July 8, 20180 found this helpful

And this is Stretch.

She's so funny and adorable, always stretching her neck around the sides of the feeder so she can keep an eye on me.

With her neck so stretched, she almost looks like he's part Ostrich and hummingbird. :)

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July 8, 20180 found this helpful

This is little Sadie.

Ever since I'd piled up rocks on the top tier of their fountain, they love it a lot more. They all really enjoy water movement it seems too.

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July 8, 20180 found this helpful

LOVE that they have names! I just love your photos of them. My dad is going to love your post :) Thank you!

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July 8, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you!
Sometimes people ask how I know which one is which, but looking closely at each one over a while, it becomes apparent they're all marked differently, and they're so cute because each one has it's own personality, just like all animals.

I'm happy your dad will enjoy them too :)

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July 9, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you again..
These stories and pictures are great.
I have several friends that I send a link to your posting and they are like me, just love reading about these tiny creatures and especially seeing the pictures.
You need a blog because there are a lot of hummingbird lovers all around the world.

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July 9, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you cybergrannie.

That's so nice that you and your friends enjoy them also.
That makes me happy:)

I am a real nut about them, and I can't get enough of them, haha
I mean every little move they make, just fascinates me to no end.

Maybe one day I will make a blog to share with people all over, that's a good idea. Thank you.

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July 17, 20180 found this helpful

UH oh....I wrote a post about this little Hummingbird, but it went somewhere, and I don't know where.
This little hummingbird is one of the Black-Chins, as they're called.

All hummingbirds in hot weather (as we have here in the 3 digits), will dangle their feet and spread out their (fingers) to cool off.
They also open their mouths, but Tux here is eating, (that's his name), but it can be seen how they dangle their (landing gear) as I call it, almost like us spreading out our hands as it is almost like he's got "dew claws" like a dog, or a thumb that's sticking out too.
Poor little birds are so hot in this heat, but, they have their ways that they're able to cool themselves down.

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July 18, 20180 found this helpful

He is so cute!
I'm learning so much about these cuties and it just makes me hungry for more.
Thanks for posting his "nibs" picture as it will go in my new folder with all his other friends.
I love how you name all these lovelies - Tux sounds like it suits him.
Betty

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July 19, 20180 found this helpful

(Describe Your Image Here)

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July 19, 20180 found this helpful

Hi Betty,

I didn't mean to post the picture of the two hummers at the feeder-it's such a dark picture, and my finger just "clicked" - and my posts keep going somewhere, (don't know where).

And thank you, I'm happy you enjoy them too! :)

This picture is another of Tux, we called him that because for some reason, he reminded us of him wearing a tuxedo, (sort of) with the defining black head the (Black-Chinned Hummingbirds) have.

I think in this next picture the pretty purple band around his neck shows too. These Black Chins are almost half the size of all the other hummingbirds we've seen here.

These tiny little birds are the ones that fly to Mexico in the winter, as they can't handle the cold temps, even here.

He's also no longer in length than my pinkie finger, they're so cute and tiny, yet have the spunk and fearlessness of an Eagle!

They can be very territorial at mating time, and this little rascal will chase every other hummingbird right out of the yard, except the one for whom he's chosen to be his girlfriend, even though he's half the size of the others, but they come right back and keep challenging him. It can get pretty crazy out in the back yard with them all when he's on the rampage.

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July 19, 20180 found this helpful

Just wanted to say if you click on the pictures of them, they enlarge a bit more. :)

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July 19, 20180 found this helpful

Thanks, I always enlarge them for my folder/PC.
I have never seen the black chin and cannot believe they are smaller!!!
I just love all of them.

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July 23, 20180 found this helpful

Cybergrannie,

If the opportunity happens, I'll try and get a picture of one of the Black-Chins next to one of the others. It's funny because these
Black-Chin hummingbirds being so small, are just so fearless.

I think the reason too that you've never seen one, is they're only in the west. These are the little guys that fly to Mexico to keep warm every year, then fly all the way back after winter has gone.

I know this will sound funny, but, we've see it each year, in that we've got 3 little Tuxies we call them (the Black-Chins) and they're here with us every day, before the sunrises, and just after it sets, they're right here eating daily at the feeders, and we just love them to pieces, well..all of them we just love to pieces, and just before the Black-Chins leave us to go to Mexico for a few months, they fly back and forth in our window, and each year, it's known by us, that this is the last time we'll see them until they return.

It's sad actually knowing they're going to be gone all those miles away, and for months, and without knowing if they're going to make it, that many mile trip, there and back again, but so far, we've been so grateful to see the three of them return after winter.

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July 23, 20180 found this helpful

It's for sure- your place is a haven and these little beauties know it and they just keep coming back home.
Marvelous..

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July 25, 20180 found this helpful

Yeah, I suppose it is:) They do love it.

Thanks Cybergrannie.

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August 6, 20180 found this helpful

How do you keep ants away from being on the hummingbird feeder?

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August 6, 20180 found this helpful

mag26gie,

Hi, there's only one way that I've found that is 100% for sure to keep the ants out of any hummingbird feeder, and I've got feeders
everywhere and have had them for years.

You need a moat for every feeder.

I learned how to make the moats from Utube, years ago, because I had non stop ants climbing up the side of the house, then over to the eaves of the house, and then they'd all go down the hummingbird feeder wires to the feeders. This happened to the feeders hanging from bushes also, and the trees. Ants find a way.

The moat is something that will hold water, and is either attached to the top of the feeder, or on the wire.

I will be happy to post a picture of one of the moats as soon as I get my computer completely back together (I changed computers this weekend) and nothing but the basics are loaded in it now, so I am not able to show you (the moats) yet.

But, if you look on Utube: (Moats for hummingbird feeders) you will see now if you'd like.

The thing is, ants will not cross over the water in any moat which protects the feeders perfectly.

I have had a couple of occasions where the water in the moat evaporated, as I have to fill the moats daily because it's so darn
hot here, and the minute it seems that a moat is dry, the feeder becomes covered in ants, then it's a major ordeal, having to take down the feeder, wash it out and then refill it. So every morn at 5 am, I'm outside making sure all the feeders are good, *clean and filled* and the moats are full of water.

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August 6, 20180 found this helpful

mag26gie,

Here's a picture I found with the home-made moats that keep ants out of feeders.

These are plastic "pipe caps" they're called. Any cap like this works well. Caps from hairspray cans or something like that would work.

I drilled a hole in each one, then strung through a rubber coated wire, then glue-gunned around that so they don't leak.

When the ants climb down the hanger wires, they get to the moat filled with water, and they will not go any further down to the feeder. They literally give up!

This will prevent any ants (ever) from touching your hummingbird feeders.

The only time you'll ever see ants "on your feeder" is if the moat is dry without water in it.

That's sometimes how I find out (the moat needs water) I see the ants "on the feeder". This method works perfectly for keeping them out.

(I've got the picture of the moats and just now tried to post it) but there's no where for me to upload a picture). Usually there is a place - but not right now. I'm so sorry, I don't know if it's my computer, me, or what.

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August 6, 20180 found this helpful

It worked (posting the picture).

If you have any questions, please let me know, I'm happy to help you with these feeders and the ant problem they cause.

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August 6, 20180 found this helpful

Well, I posted underneath the picture, but I don't know where that post went.

I think I clicked on comment, and it went somewhere??

All I was saying was "it worked" and the picture of the moats posted so I hope that can help you see how they're done.

The ants can only climb down the wire that the feeder hangs from, but...as soon as they get to the "moat" which is before the feeder, they turn right back around and go away because they won't go any further, they can't, because the water in the moat is there.

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August 7, 20180 found this helpful

This is neat - I will have to start looking for suitable items to use for moats. Thanks for the tip (you should post it) and clear instructions.
Betty

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August 10, 20180 found this helpful

How to make a Hummingbird Feeder "moat".

This is the sure-fire way to keep ants out of any hanging feeder.

The items needed to make a "moat" are:

A cap of some kind. Make sure it's at least 1-2 inches deep. (this is for the water)

A plastic coated wire, or a thick wire. (which feeds through the cap)

Glue gun.

Screw driver, or something made of steel you can heat up on your stove burner - (to poke a hole in the cap).

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August 10, 20180 found this helpful

1) First heat up your (Phillips screw driver) with the heat of a flame, which this allows the Phillips screw driver to glide right through the plastic cap and make a hole right in the middle of the cap, not too big, as you only want to string through your plastic coated wire, or plain wire. If your wire is thin, use something thin to poke a hole in the cap.

2) Then string through your wire, and begin twisting the bottom part.

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August 10, 20180 found this helpful

Next, twist the bottom of the wire real tight like this.

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August 10, 20180 found this helpful

Cybergrannie,

I'm very happy to show everyone who has hummers eating from their feeders how to make the "moat".

I am having problems posting all this in it's sequence, so I'll make a new post under the (Garden and Nature) photos.

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August 10, 20180 found this helpful

Cybergrannie,

I made a step by step of how to make the moats, and it will be under the Garden and Nature Photo's (soon) I hope. It's Pending right now.

This will alleviate any (ant problem) anyone has with their hummingbird feeders. :)

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August 16, 20180 found this helpful

Hi Cybergrannie :)

The Ant Moat for the Hummingbird feeders is posted now on the
*DIY Contest*.

The step by step is there, and I know anyone with hummingbird feeders will love this, because there will be "no more ants" in the sugar water! :) Yay!

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August 18, 20180 found this helpful

Thank you!!
I will start working on this soon but my hummers will not stay around very much longer this year - I hope their visits will get longer as I put up more feeders. I had 10 feeders before I moved but it has been slow getting that many up again.

Very clear instructions..

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August 28, 20180 found this helpful

I just had to share this video with anyone who loves Hummingbirds, because it's one of the most wonderful and beautiful things in life, imho

This was on the news a couple of years ago.

I don't know these people, but, I know this guy has a heart the size of Texas.

This man rescues a dog. The dog then rescues a hummingbird.

Then the guy says we were all rescued!

They call this little hummingbird "Hummer" and he says it's like having a Tinkerbell in their home.

This story is just as precious as precious can be.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzxsagVcKCg

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September 3, 20180 found this helpful

What an amazing story! I think he is our kind of person...

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September 4, 20180 found this helpful

I'm so glad you watched that news story on "Hummer" and her family. And yep, he sure is our kind of person. :)

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September 2, 20180 found this helpful

Lovely photo! I have never been upclose and personal with a hummingbird before. :)

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September 4, 20180 found this helpful

It's quite amazing how Hummingbirds really do watch us *or anyone* when they're in the yard, and after they've seen a person many many times over, they then allow a person to get much closer, even close enough where they'll eat at a feeder standing on a persons finger.

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