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Growing Lantana from a Cutting

Category Cuttings
Try getting cuttings from the tips of the plant for the best success. This is a guide about growing lantana from a cutting.
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July 13, 2015

I tried rooting lantana several times without much success. I was using the standard method for taking cuttings. When I told a nice lady friend about my poor results, she told me I would have better luck if I took cuttings from the tips of the plant. Since taking her advice, I have had near 100% success.

When taking cuttings, it is good to have the parent plant well hydrated. I take cuttings in the cooler part of the day, usually late evening, and always try to work in the shade.

The parent plant is in a small pot. It has lots of bloom buds. Since this is a trailing type lantana, it will look nice if allowed to grow larger in a hanging basket. I will transplant it after taking my cuttings.

I prepare a pot with a rich, light, moist but not wet soil. If the soil drains readily and is rich in organic matter, no special potting or rooting soil is necessary, nor is rooting hormone.

With clean, sharp scissors, I cut tips from the stems. I select stems without flowers or flower buds. You should have good success with cuttings that have blooms or buds if you snip them off before inserting them in soil. Make a cut just below the third pair of leaves (not counting any very small leaves at the tip). Carefully cut away the third and second pair of leaves. Insert the cuttings in the soil to a depth of midway between lower joint.

Cover the cuttings with plastic to retain moisture during the rooting process. When rooting small amounts of cuttings, I find it convenient to use an inverted soda bottle from which the top has been removed.

Place the pot in a place with bright or dappled light but not direct sun. Check the soil occasionally to make sure it stays moderately moist but not wet. Within 3-4 weeks, you should notice small, new growth at the tips of the cuttings. If a cutting is lifted, you should see roots. At this point, wait 2 weeks before carefully lifting the cuttings to transplant them into their permanent container.

Any of the summer months is a good time to root lantanas. I always root a few, in case I should loose my larger plants. And don't forget, in the true gardener's spirit, they are nice to give as gifts.

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July 13, 20150 found this helpful

There must be a glitch in the system, somewhere. This is the third recent post I don't remember entering into a contest. Rooting Lantana is not really contest material. I wouldn't complain if I did get lucky, though.

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Anonymous
August 31, 20170 found this helpful

Do you have to have green growth at the top of the ones you're putting in the pots? A few other websites said to strip everything clean, so basically it looks like a stick in dirt. I just did some like that (so they look like sticks) and now I'm wondering if they will take or not, or if I need to do some more with the green at the top.

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September 6, 20170 found this helpful

Some things will root well when all the foliage has been stripped away. I don't know if this is true with lantana. If you have access to more cuttings, you could try both ways. If you do, please post your results here.

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Thank you.

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