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Making Homemade Jelly

Thinking of using that bumper crop of fruit, great prices on fruit at the market, or even fruit juice to make homemade jelly. There are some questions that might arise. This is a guide about making homemade jelly.

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Homemade Jelly
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May 25, 2016 Flag
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This is a guide about making jelly from fruit juice. A quick way to make jelly even if you don't have a lot of seasonal fruit is to use fruit juice.

Making Jelly from Fruit Juice

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July 15, 2015 Flag
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I made raspberry syrup, but it is way too thin. I'm thinking of making it into jelly. Any ideas how much pectin to use and any other ideas to make this process easy as possible?

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    July 16, 20150 found this helpful

    Simple! You can just boil the syrup down to reduce the water content.

    Getting the right consistency takes some trial & error, because the sauce thickens as it cools. Boil it for a bit to reduce, allow it to cool, test it and boil again if too runny. If too thick, mix in a bit of water.

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    August 31, 2006 Flag
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    Can I make a jelly recipe, add water to make a syrup and then can it?

    Karaof4 from MN

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    September 1, 20060 found this helpful

    Kara,

    I don't know if it can be done that way or not; however, a lady on a crafting group I belong to said that she was making jelly and it didn't set properly so she was going to use it for syrup. She said what she did was that she didn't use the right amount of sugar so the jelly didn't set properly.

    Hope that helps some?

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    September 1, 20060 found this helpful

    You can do as the previous person said-- however, I believe the sugar amount is figured to preserve the juice-- which then allows canning--

    I too have had "apple jelly syrup"- and it isn't bad at all-- however-- In lieu of changing the formulation for jelly to get to the syrup stage-- go ahead and can for jelly-- and when you want syrup, add water to your jelly and nuke it in the M/W-- get the best of both worlds-- without risking your good homemade jelly!

    good luck

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    September 1, 20060 found this helpful

    I wouldn't cut back on the juice or sugar, but

    just use 1/2 a package of certo.

    That's what I do for chokecherry syrup.

    Good Luck

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    September 4, 20060 found this helpful

    The stuff that causes jelly to 'jell' is a substance called 'pectin', a carbohydrate that occurs naturally in ripe fruits and berries. Many jelly recipes call for adding pectin in case the fruit doesn't have enough to allow it to congeal. (Kraft's 'Sure-Jell" comes to mind, but there are probably other brands available.) If your recipe calls for adding pectin and you don't want it to set, the first thing I'd do is leave that stuff out. I don't know what to do about the naturally occurring pectin in the fruit; if it's good and ripe fruit often has enough to make the jelly set.

    Good luck, and happy Labor Day, everyone!

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    July 20, 2010 Flag
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    How can I fix jelly that does not set up after it is done?

    By Barbara from Zenda, KS

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    July 22, 20100 found this helpful

    That is a tough one I learned from my mother-in-law and it used to seem so easy.I made 24 pints of plum jelly last year 12 set up so thick and hard. I had to heat to get it out of the jar, the other 12 was like a thick sauce. I used the recommend amount of sure-jell,I would like to find out if anyone has suggestions also, It was all cooked in the same pot.

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    July 22, 20100 found this helpful

    Several years ago I made mulberry jelly that did not set up. I called the 800 number on the box of sure jell. She told me that if the sure jell was out of date that could be the problem. That is something that you really need to watch. I told her that was not the problem. She said that I should go through the whole cooking process again but not to add more sugar, but to add the amt of sure jell that was required. I was disgusted and thought it was too much work. So my husband had some very good mulberry syrup for his pancakes. Now, every time I make jelly he hopes it won't set up so that he can have some more flavored syrup. LOL!

    Margaret from Denton, Texas

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    October 1, 2009 Flag
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    What will happen if I forgot to add lemon in my canned jelly?

    By Unycrn from Enoch, UT

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    October 1, 20090 found this helpful

    Some jellies taste better with the lemon but it doesn't hurt if you forget it. No one will know unless you tell them.

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    October 1, 20090 found this helpful

    Quite often the lemon is required to level out the pectin according to the fruit being used, which makes the jell process work, so if you have made it without the lemon, and it has not set up, (jelled well) within a week or two, it is possible you will have to call your jelly a pancake and waffle spread, which i do frequently, on purpose. If it tastes good, just enjoy it. From Loretta in Alabama, who raised 7 by using every means possible to not waste anything edible.

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    September 4, 2006 Flag
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    I would like to make jelly without sugar. I buy "Simply Fruit" from town but would like to make my own if I could. Any ideas?

    Mona from Lumberton, MS

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    September 6, 20060 found this helpful

    Ball brand has jelly making products for sugar-free jelly and jams. check in your local grocery store with canning jars and jam making products.

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    September 6, 20060 found this helpful

    IF you are looking to make jelly for a diabetic, ask the person's doctor if fructose would be all right to use. NOT the high fructose corn syrup, but the fruit sugar. I make many canned items for a diabetic using fructose and it is acceptable. I buy mine from an Amish bulk food store and it isn't too very expensive. I know that there are several Amish in Missouri. Try one of those. The only thing that you can't use fructose successfuly in is regular baked goods, such as cakes and cookies. For some reason, those come out like sponges!!

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    September 6, 20060 found this helpful

    I make freezer jam all the time with splendia and love it. Some people don't like the sweetners but it's fine for me. It's sweeter than sugar so try 1/2 the amount called for and taste test from there.

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    August 20, 2004 Flag
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    I am about to embark on a jelly making frenzy so as to start a business. Anyone have any advice? Is there a way to make really large batches at a time?

    Lynne

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    April 30, 20050 found this helpful

    Thank you, I have been looking for some help with starting a small jelly making business. Just the 2 feed backs I read has helped me with vital information.

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    July 20, 20050 found this helpful

    Does anyone know how I can go about getting my kitchen certified and what the requirements are? I would really appreciate any advice. Also, I have a stationary company if anyone would like a discount on business cards and such. Please email me at slystx @ aol.com (remove spaces)

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    January 22, 20060 found this helpful

    i am thinking of starting a jelly making business. I have no idea on where to start from, i need some help.

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    November 11, 20080 found this helpful

    We made some concord grape jelly and it didn't set. I think there were maybe about 2 cups too much liquid for the amount of pectin we put in. Does anyone know whether we can re-heat it and add more pectin? Or do I have to settle with 10 jars of grape syrup? Many thanks!

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    July 21, 2004 Flag
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    Does anyone else think that the price of jelly-making is too high? I bought a package of surejell today for 2.29. I bought this in addition to the sugar and the canning lids. I picked the grapes for free, but many people buy their fruit for jelly-making. I read in the instructions that one package will make 8 cups of grape jelly. I read on the ingredient label that what I am buying (1.75 oz) is Dextrose (some kind of sugar), fumaric acid, and fruit pectin. 2.29 seems way too high for what I'm getting.

    Does anyone have an alternative for making jelly, or a cheaper source of buying the fruit pectin? Thanks--Paula in Waco.

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    August 21, 20060 found this helpful

    UNRIPE APPLES!!! My DH "pruned" our tree, so I salvaged the little green apples. I found an article in the Oregonian, (lost the date!) by Vern Nelson (the hungry gardener) and here is a brief rundown:

    Select only hard fruit with a strong sour taste. If they start to sweeten, there will not be enough pectin;

    Wash and cut apples (quarter large, half for small) but do not core or peel. Add water until almost covered, place lid on pot and cook on low (I set 2 on electric) stirring every 15 minutes until it breaks down into a thin sauce. (Mine took 5 hours)

    Strain sauce with cheesecloth, or teeshirt inot another large pot/container and let it set overnight dripping. DO NOT force it to strain, as this will make it cloudy and adversely affect the outcome.

    Test the liquid when cooled by putting a spoonful into a small glass with one inch of rubbing alcohol. Use a fork to retrieve the clump. If it remains clumped on the fork, it is a perfect gel. If it sags or hangs, it will be a little loose. This depends on the cooking time.

    You can freeze it or fill hot, sterilized jars and process at 185 degrees for 15 minutes.

    To use: Use 4-6 tablespoons per cup of juice or fruit. For each 5 cups of pectin/fruit mix, add about 7 cups of sugar.

    For more information: Vern Nelson: the Hungry Gardner, PO BOX 16945 Portland OR 97292 anewleaf1@aol.com

    It was a blessing to find this! I used a grocery bag full of apples and made 18 oz of pectin, but I also used the pulp to make 12 cups of applesauce with 2 cups of sugar and some cinnamon...YUMMY

    I still need to wait for the rest of the infamous NW blackberries to ripen, as I am making my very first batch of freezer jam with this,,,I'll keep y'all posted!

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    May 29, 20070 found this helpful

    Would very green mangos work the same way little green apples do? Have a Salvadoran friend making candy for a living who asked me if I could find a more economical source of pectin.

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    September 24, 20080 found this helpful

    I managed to find a clearance sale at a local store, MCP for 1.39 which I think works better than surejell..also I used one cup of pineapple juice for each 2 cups of berry juice (I made blackberry today) and it tastes awesome. Also you can add a little water to the fruit juice if you don't have enough for a full batch and it will taste just fine, if you have bought jelly at any supermarket you know that it is VERY watered down. Also scrape any leftvers from the batch into a cup, cover and refrigerate, it will taste just the same and you will have a lot of jelly that would have otherwise gone down the drain. Good Luck

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    September 12, 20140 found this helpful

    The problem with using no fruit pectin and letting it cook down is that you only get about half as much jam to put up.

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    July 20, 2010 Flag
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    I made elderberry jelly last night, it didn't set up. I used two pouches of liquid pectin. Any suggestions?

    By Boo/Nana from Eldon, MO

    Answers:

    Jelly Did Not Set Up

    My grandmother always added apple juice to elderberry jelly. I always thought it was because of the taste but perhaps it was because the pectin wouldn't set it up. (08/19/2009)

    By CharlieDi

    Jelly Did Not Set Up

    If the balance of acid, sugar, pectin and liquid isn't right, the network of pectin molecules may not form. If this happens, what's left will still make a good ice cream topping, but it isn't much use as a spread. (08/19/2009)

    By scott E.

    Jelly Did Not Set Up

    The simplest option is to melt a jelly in a small amount of water (you can do this in the micro) and stir it into your jam. (08/23/2009)

    By skinnyjinny

    Jelly Did Not Set Up

    I have made lots of elderberry jelly, and it is notorious for not setting up. When I first made it, and this happened, I called the Sure-Jel help line. They told me to add just enough water to get it to get it hot again and add more Sure-Jel (or pectin of choice) according to the amount of jelly that you end up with. If need be, and you need a little more than one...just go ahead and add two. I've never had any failures this way. I have learned over the years, however, to add extra pectin to begin with and hope it works. I check the "jel-stage" the old fashioned way by letting it run off the edge of a spoon. If it doesn't set up to my satisfaction, I add even more at that time. To me it's worth it. There's nothing like elderberry jelly. It just takes a little extra coaxing. **LOL** (08/23/2009)

    By lmgluvscat

    Jelly Did Not Set Up

    This recipe is from the Ball Blue Book of Preserving. As you can see, it doesn't require added pectin. It could be that the vinegar helps the pH and gets it to set up.

    Elderberry Jam:

  1. 2 quarts crushed elderberries
  2. 6 cups sugar
  3. 1/4 cup vinegar

    Combine elderberries, sugar and vinegar in a large sauce-pot. Bring slowly to a boil, stirring until sugar dissolves. Cook rapidly to gelling point. As mixture thickens, stir frequently to prevent sticking. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head-space. Adjust two-piece caps. Process 15 minutes in a boiling-water canner. Add more time for higher altitudes. Good luck! (08/24/2009)

    By coreenhart

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    Food and Recipes Canning Jam and JellySeptember 19, 2012
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