Share a SolutionAsk a Question
To Top

Building Raised Beds

There are a variety of reasons to build raised garden beds, from poor soil to creating a more orderly garden space. This is a guide about building raised beds.
Ad

Solutions

Share on ThriftyFunThis guide contains the following solutions. Have something to add? Please share your solution!

March 26, 20170 found this helpful

Raised Beds
With Concrete Blocks

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

There are good reasons to create a raised garden bed, and concrete blocks can make it easy to build. This guide is about making raised beds with concrete blocks.

Ad
Read More...

3 found this helpful
March 22, 2016

I live in Tahiti and we have a lot of rain year-round. This can be a problem when it comes to planting flowers or plants in your garden. Therefore, I decided to raise my flower beds so when it rains the water doesn't flood my plants.

Unfortunately, when the water drains from the garden it started to erode the dirt in my flower beds and they started to crumble and wash away. In order to stop the erosion and the dirt from washing away, I needed to find a solution for this problem.

I have a river that runs in front of my home. I gathered the rocks from the riverbed and brought them into the garden. I used the rocks to start building a barrier for my flower beds.

Materials needed:

  • small to medium sized rocks
  • wheelbarrow
  • small hand shovel
  • large shovel
  • dirt

Start by digging a small trench along the line of your flower bed. Place a row of medium sized rocks in the trench.

Afterwards, fill the back side of the trench and rocks with dirt. You'll need to pack the dirt down around the rocks to hold them in place.

Continue adding rocks and dirt as you build your rock wall. You're basically stacking the rocks on top of each other. You'll need to find a rock that fits well on top of the bottom rock. Adding dirt to the back of the rocks holds them in place and supports the rock wall. Furthermore, it fills and replaces the dirt in your flower bed that has washed away from the rain.

I continued adding rocks and dirt until I had made a nice rock wall that would protect my plants. Now when it rains the dirt in my flower beds is protected and no longer erodes or washes away. Furthermore, the rock wall flower beds add to the natural look of the garden.

My garden is tropical and has a lot of flowers and plants. I keep the center of the yard open for the animals and walking around. Here on the islands, it's better to have a gravel yard than a yard with a lawn. Around my garden I have different areas that I have built raised rock flower beds.

Ad
Comment Was this helpful? 3
Anonymous Flag
April 23, 20160 found this helpful

very nice!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Read More Comments

March 16, 20170 found this helpful

Cardboard Box

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

Raised beds are usually made from wood, concrete or stone. You can use something as simple as a large cardboard box however, it will last likely only last one season. This is a guide about making raised beds using cardboard boxes.

Related Content(article continues below)
Read More...

June 23, 20051 found this helpful

Making Raised Beds with Styrofoam

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? 1

If your ground is solid rock, the best way to raise veggies is in a raised bed. My husband built a raised bed garden this year. The "blocks that hold the garden together are, believe it or not, Styrofoam. This was salvaged from boat docks a few years ago when they banned its use in the local lakes.

Read More...

September 7, 20160 found this helpful

Several raised garden beds full of lush plants

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

This is a guide about making a raised be vegetable garden. There are a number of ways you can create a very successful raised vegetable garden, whether you build with new materials or use recycled items.

Read More...

November 20, 2008

We made a 30x20 foot garden in our back yard with plastic and cement blocks. You do not have to remove grass. Put down plastic or a thick layer of news papers, and place cement blocks on top around the edge of the space.

Comment Was this helpful? Yes
Read More...

0 found this helpful
February 8, 2007

A easy raised bed from a bag of soil.

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

If you're short on space or the soil in your area is riddled by sand or clay, building raised beds may be the best solution to your gardening woes. You'll trade the time, money and effort required amending poor quality soil for maximum yields in a minimum amount of space.

Read More...

August 19, 2011

I love my raised beds. It helps keep different gardens separated and makes it easier to keep weeds out. They can be watered separately, depending on what you are growing in them.

Comment Was this helpful? 2
Read More...

October 9, 20080 found this helpful

Straw Bales For Gardening

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

This idea is very old, my grandmother used to have straw bale gardens. It was great for her not to have to stoop over to pick and weed her garden.

Read More...

0 found this helpful
January 31, 2008

I landscape on an angle from the house. I will make a three level planter; the first level is 8 feet wide and long, the sides are white rock or, preferably, pressure treated wood.

Comment Was this helpful? Yes
Read More...

0 found this helpful
January 16, 2012

In the summer of 2011, I had raised beds made to accommodate a wheelchair and my short arm width necessary to reach across to weed. They have landscape fabric to control weeds on the bottom, a layer of sod face down, then layers of newspaper and leaves that will decompose and on top, regular soil.

Comment Was this helpful? Yes
Read More...

July 2, 20100 found this helpful

Raised Garden Bed

CommentPin It! Was this helpful? Yes

Here is a raised bed that my husband put together this weekend. It is 4x10 feet and 20 inches high.

Read More...

Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

0 found this helpful
October 30, 2008 Flag

My husband and I are looking for a platform bed. Does anyone has a good suggestion? Where can we find a good deal on a good quality platform bed? Thanks.

Peggy from Mcallen, TX

AnswerWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
April 26, 20090 found this helpful

We bought our bed from llbean.com, it comes in several flat pack boxes that are shipped FedEx. I put it together myself and have slept on it for over 3 years.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
June 25, 20100 found this helpful

Fake one like we did. I wanted one too but couldn't afford it. So we took 2x12's sanded, stained to match bedroom furniture, put the box spring on the floor and boxed it in. Mattress on top no headboard. Looks like the pretties you see in the magazines. I also wanted Asian furniture like the Mino collection which cost about 2500.00 for livingroom set. We made a couch,settee and two chairs for under 300.00 which included all materials. We reused our old cushions and I sewed covers for them. This stuff is stout and can withstand active children and all the cushion are removable to be washed.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

0 found this helpful
November 1, 2013 Flag

I have read how straw bales are used to build a raised garden. I was wondering if straw could be used to line the bottom of a wood build raised garden? I was thinking that the straw would decompose and provide nutrients for the soil as well as help to maintain moisture. Please help out.

By Faye B.

AnswerWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
November 5, 20130 found this helpful

That would depend on what kind of straw you're using and what kind of plants you're going to put in. Pine straw (needles) are acidic. The straw that's left over from cutting hay is full of seeds. Also, as the straw breaks down the level of your soil will drop.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

0 found this helpful
January 4, 2011 Flag

I am looking for an economical way to edge my raised beds. I have a large garden and lumber is just way too expensive to do all of the beds. Any ideas?

Hardiness Zone: 6a

By Heidi from PA

AnswerWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
January 7, 20110 found this helpful

Heidi, you could use old wooden pallets. I know at work, we gets lots of spare ones. We give them away to people for putting firewood on, temporary flooring, broken ones are ideal for firewood etc. Most businesses are pleased to get rid of them. They make good compost heap frames. Most are made of untreated wood, which is ideal. No chemicals leaching into plants. Best of all, free. I have heard of freecyle that may be another option. Many lumber yards also have offcuts and they will sometimes give them away or even packing crates are good, if companies import heavy items. Just a few ideas. brentnz

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
January 11, 20110 found this helpful

I have used 8x8x16 cinder blocks as the edging for my raised beds. I do "nail" them down with rebar so they don't shift. If you get a sale, they aren't too expensive, or check around colleges when school gets out and pick 'em up for free when the students leave them behind.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

0 found this helpful
August 22, 2014 Flag

I would like to construct a raised bed garden on a hilly area. The best plan would look like 3 beds of 3 feet by 10 feet. Any suggestions? The is soil is poor and possibly rocky so I think just placing the boxes on top and filling with good soil is best. To avoid tons of soil I am thinking of raising the bottoms up on the lower box. I need advice on drainage too.

By Nancy

AnswerWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

0 found this helpful
February 9, 2009

I would like to use all the rocks that seem to grow here to good use. Instead of buying wood to make raised beds in the garden I would like to try building it with the stones. The previous owner left three bags of quick-crete, so I was hoping to use that. Will I have to wash all the rocks first? Do I have to put down a layer of sand before I even start? How long will it have to 'set' before I put in the dirt?
Has anyone tried this before, and what worked and what didn't.

Any knowledge would be greatly appreciated.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
February 10, 20090 found this helpful

Whenever you make anything outside using concrete, you should dig into the soil and lay a foundation. Check your area to see what your frost line is, that will tell you how deep to dig. Since this isn't the foundation for a building, merely a raised garden bed, it won't need to be as deep as the frostline--but that will give you something to go by. If you fail to do this, cold freezes can crack and raise part of the raised wall. Personally, depending on the types of rocks, I'd either dry stack them, or if they're smaller, build a form out of scrap wood and make the retaining wall in sections, then just lay them together on top of the ground. This way if one lifts, you can dig to lower it; if it sinks, you can add soil to raise it; if you want to move the bed or make it bigger/smaller, that would be an option too.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
February 13, 20090 found this helpful

I have a small hand book, stone gardens. You are more than welcome to it. Let me know, I will mail it to you.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

0 found this helpful
October 24, 2011 Flag

Can you turn an old fridge into a raised veggie bed? I would need to put drainage holes in the back and lay it back on ground. What are potential hazards?

By Bec B

AnswerWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
October 25, 20110 found this helpful

Refrigerators are an environmental hazard that need to be specially disposed of, so turning one into a veggie bed isn't a good idea I'm afraid. Depending on the age of the fridge it might contain CFC's, mercury, and other baddies. Even newer ones have things you wouldn't want leaking into the soil. Better to see your fridge properly recycled. There are plenty of ways to make raised beds from reclaimed materials that would be a safer bet. Good luck with your garden!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

Photos

Share on ThriftyFunCheck out these photographs. Click at right to share your own photo in this guide.

0 found this helpful
April 9, 2007 Flag

Here is my raised garden.

By Ross from Merryville, Louisiana

My Raised Garden

CommentLike this photo?Like? Yes
May 24, 20070 found this helpful

This garden is filled with cypress mulch in the walking area under the mulch we put the black weed cloth. This is our first year to realy get veggies out of her. She was built last spring and the dirt was just ripe this year aroud a 7 ph.

ReplyLike this photo?Like? Yes
Read More Comments

July 2, 2010 Flag

I upgraded my boxes this year, bigger and taller.

By Melissa

Photo of raised bed made with wood.

CommentLike this photo?Like? Yes
July 5, 20100 found this helpful

Great idea, as you don't have to worry about what's under your soil at ground level, clay in our case! Here's more on that: http://www.oldh  tailed/751.shtml

ReplyLike this photo?Like? Yes
In This Guide
Gardening in Raised Beds
Gardening in Raised Beds
Categories
Home and Garden Gardening Raised BedsAugust 12, 2011
Guides
stack of railroad ties
Using Railroad Ties for Raised Vegetable Beds
Several raised garden beds full of lush plants
Making a Raised Bed Vegetable Garden
Raised Beds
With Concrete Blocks
Making Raised Beds With Concrete Blocks
Cardboard Box
Making Raised Garden Beds Using Cardboard Boxes
More
👒
Mother's Day Ideas!
🐰
Easter Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
You are viewing the desktop version of this page: View Mobile Site.
© 1997-2017 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on March 29, 2017 at 6:57:29 PM on 10.0.2.202 in 6 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
Loading Something Awesome!