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Is Amish Bread Starter Still Good?

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How many days can Amish friendship batter be out before baking? I am way over due, but still want to make it. I am afraid it may not be good anymore.

Lisa from South Bay, California

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Recent Answers

Here are the recent answer to this question.

By Beth [25]01/13/2009

I had a friend who never used the starter. She just put ALL that stuff together and made larger loaves. They were excellent. So you can start over and keep some to share, or not.

By Babette [33]01/06/2009

I found this information on a another website and I have several recipes if you're interested just let me know.

You can freeze the starter for future use.This last time I froze them. I took one out and just let it sit for the 10 days, not adding the extra 3 cups on the 5th or 10th day, I just stirred it each day. Then on the 10th day I followed the rest of the recipe and the bread turned out wonderful, no difference and I don't have to find 3 people to give a starter too. Thought this might help anyone trying to find a friend to share with or if your friends all say no.

If you read up on sourdoughs and starters, you'll find that one of the reasons people mess with them is the health benefit of the natural occurring yeasts. Unfortunately, most people these days have become too "domesticated", and so can't see how letting something go sour on its own can be any good. Thus, most "official" starter recipes call for addition of store bought yeast. In the authentic way, you start with one cup each of flour, milk and sugar, stir it every day for the first 4 days, add one cup each of flour, milk and sugar on day 5, stir well; stir it every day for the next 4 days; add one cup each of flour, milk and sugar on day 10, stir well - and you should be ready to use the starter.

Traditional recipes ask to only use wooden or plastic bowls/jars/utensils. This is done because there is a possibility of the yeast's acidity acting on the metal and changing PH and messing everything up. The other important point to make, is that when you're making the starter, it should be left uncovered or covered loosely with cheese cloth or such. The starter needs airflow! Once ready, the starter could be kept in the fridge for about 2 weeks; to reactivate it, take it out and feed it with one cup each of flour, milk and sugar, stir well and leave at room temperature.

I think that starter can be covered with a lid/kept in a zip-lock bag while refrigerated. For those who want to have their starter always available - keep it at room temperature, stir it every day.

By Marjorie C. Woodworth [82]01/05/2009

Please don't jeopardize your health, when in doubt throw it out.

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