Dispose of Prescription Bottles Safely

Be especially safe with your old prescription bottles. Be sure and mark through the name of person and drug name with a marker before putting in trash as some people would try to get it filled, especially if it is for a pain pill. God Bless you and stay safe!

Ad

By DCW816 from TN

March 4, 20090 found this helpful

Many of the labels pull off easily now. We pull them off, and snip them up. Good reminder for people!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 5, 20090 found this helpful

If you put water in the prescription bottles then soak them in water dor a few hours. The name of the person and other info should come of easily.

After all the info is off you can cram 2-3 plastic grocery bags in one and give it to someone who has a baby. That way they can put the bottle in their diaper bag and always have a plastic bag to dispose of dirty diapers.

Zig

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20090 found this helpful

This is good advice. No sense in letting personal info get into the wrong hands.

All of our prescription bottles have easy to pull off sticky labels. I pull them off, tear up and pitch. I then keep some of the bottles to use for various purposes and save up the rest to give to a local Vet. Animal hospitals are grateful to get them to use for pet meds and then they don't have to buy them.

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20090 found this helpful

I think a better way is to peel or soak the labels off, cut them up (as suggested by Jilson) and then RECYCLE the plastic bottle. This is both safe for others and good for the environment:-)

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 7, 20090 found this helpful

To Zig thanks for the idea about the bottle and the plastic bags. I have an autistic daughter who is still not potty trained and me I carry about everything I can think of in my bag. I love the ideal real cool too Thanks again

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20100 found this helpful

I too peel the labels off the prescription bottles and stick them all on a paper bag and put them through the shredder when its full. I also save the bottles but had no idea what to do with them but I will now give them to the vet. All useful information. Thanks for sharing.

Ad
ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20100 found this helpful

It's easy to roll up the label as you peel it--keep the print side INSIDE! Also put the colored warning labels on the big label before you start rolling. The warning labels such as 'may cause drowsiness' or do not operate machinery, etc., etc.', could lead someone sifting through your trash to think you have a drug in your home that will make them 'high', even if the label was attached to a blood pressure prescription!

After I have it rolled up and all info 'stuck' on the inside, I fold or cut it into smaller portions. I don't think a dumpster diver/trash picker would EVER be able to unroll it in a readable condition! You do NOT want someone to think, or know, that you have meds. in your home that could make them 'high'; it could lead to a break-in!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20100 found this helpful

Don't worry, most pain prescriptions (especially the stronger ones) cannot be filled unless the customer has an actual PAPER prescription. Very few pain pills can be called in by the receptionist. And no pharmacist that cares about keeping his job would fill a prescription (especially for pain pills) with only the prescription bottle because the DEA keeps track of every strong drug that is prescribed & filled to make the doctor & the pharmacist accountable.

What I would fear is the information on the bottle getting into the wrong hands, because we don't need anyone to know how sick we are or with what & there is always the problem with identify theft because there can be quite a bit of information on those pill bottles! Your best bet is to remove the label then crush them or even better, remove the label & recycle them for holding tiny household items.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 6, 20100 found this helpful

I remove the labels off my prescription bottles and shred them in my shredder, There many uses for the empty bottles. I like the idea of using them for plastic bags.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 7, 20100 found this helpful

(submitted via email)

Better yet, if possible, peel off the lable. mamajo

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 8, 20100 found this helpful

I take my empty Rx bottles back to the pharmacy where they recycle them. This way I know they're not falling into the wrong hands!

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 13, 20100 found this helpful

(submitted via email)

In re: Dispose of Prescription Bottles Safely.

a. Being a disabled vet with a pharmacy of meds, I often empty a

Rx bottle. I always remove and destroy the label(s) in one of two

ways:

1. If it will peel off easily, I peel it off and destroy with

my home shredder. Note: if there is still 'stickum' on the label,

I first stick it to another piece of paper to avoid gumming up

the shredder.

2. If it will not peel easily, I soak it in warm water until

it comes of and usually it falls apart or becomes a soggy paper

mache mess, e.g., not recoverable or readable. If not, I let it

dry, and then shred it.

b. I reuse the bottles, for the most part, (or dispose of the

ones I can't use) after a THOROUGH cleaning, and when dry use

them to store hardware, craft items, etc.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes
March 13, 20100 found this helpful

(submitted via email)

In re: Dispose of Prescription Bottles Safely.

a. Being a disabled vet with a pharmacy of meds, I often empty a

Rx bottle. I always remove and destroy the label(s) in one of two

ways:

1. If it will peel off easily, I peel it off and destroy with

my home shredder. Note: if there is still 'stickum' on the label,

I first stick it to another piece of paper to avoid gumming up

the shredder.

2. If it will not peel easily, I soak it in warm water until

it comes of and usually it falls apart or becomes a soggy paper

mache mess, e.g., not recoverable or readable. If not, I let it

dry, and then shred it.

b. I reuse the bottles, for the most part, (or dispose of the

ones I can't use) after a thorough cleaning, and when dry use

them to store hardware, craft items, etc.

ReplyWas this helpful?Helpful? Yes

Add your voice! Click below to comment. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

Related
Categories
Health & Beauty Prescription DrugsMarch 4, 2009
Guides
Prescription Eyeglasses Sitting on Eye Chart
Saving Money on Prescription Eyeglasses
Old woman holding prescription drug bottles.
Prescription Drugs Tips for Seniors
Prescription Bottle and Pills
Prescription Drug Safety
Recycling Prescription Bottles, Prescription Bottles on White Background
Recycling Prescription Bottles
More
🎄
Christmas Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
You are viewing the desktop version of this page: View Mobile Site
© 1997-2016 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Published by . Page generated on November 29, 2016 at 12:22:11 PM on 10.0.0.118 in 3 seconds. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of ThriftyFun's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy. If you have any problems or suggestions feel free to Contact Us.
Loading Something Awesome!