Add to GuideAsk a Question
To Top

Rooting a Cactus Pad

Category Cactus
Many types of cactus propagate in nature by their ability to have a pad or segment grow into a new plant. You can do this too, at home, and increase your cactus garden plantings. This is a guide about rooting a cactus pad.
Ad

Solutions

Share on ThriftyFunThis guide contains the following solutions. Have something to add? Please share your solution!

July 7, 2016

I recently purchased a prickly pear cactus at the store. After getting it home, one of the pads got knocked off. I decided to root the broken pad and now will have two cacti for the price of one! :)

Supplies:

  • cookie sheet or cooling rack
  • tongs
  • paper towels
  • rubber bands
  • cactus soil
  • pot
  • pieces of cardboard
  • heavy work gloves
Ad

Steps:

  1. Here is a photo my new cactus and the broken pad.
  2. Lay the pad onto a cookie sheet or cooling rack. If you chose to use a cooling rack, place something under it to catch any needles that fall off. Keep the pad in a dry room that is above 60 degrees F and out of direct sunlight. Allow the pad to develop a callus over the next 7-10 days.
  3. Chose a fairly large pot with drainage holes. Fill the pot with soil, leaving 1-2 inches at the top empty. Wrap the ends of the tongs with paper towels and secure them with rubber bands. This will help protect the pad when you pick it up.
  4. Ad

  5. Dig a slot in the soil, so that about 1/3 of the pad is buried. Then gently lift up the pad and set it down into the slot.
  6. Fill in the slot and firmly press the soil in place, so that the pad can stand upright on its own.
  7. Ad

  8. Water the cutting until the soil is evenly moist. Keep the cactus pad indoors, making sure the temperature remains above 60 degrees F, and in filtered sunlight. Water whenever the soil begins to dry out.
  9. Once the cactus is established and begins to produce new growth, you can reduce watering to 1/4 inch of water, every 7 days. Continue to water the cactus this way while nighttime temperatures remain over 60 degrees F. When nighttime temperatures begin to drop below 60 degrees F, you can reduce watering to 1/4 inch every 14 days.
  10. Ad

Planting outside in the ground: You can transplant the cactus outdoors and into the ground if you choose. Do so in the spring, once ground temperatures remain above 60 degrees F.

Comment Was this helpful? 1

Comments

July 9, 20160 found this helpful

Remember that Opuntias (Prickly Pear) in the wild get knocked apart by deer and cattle, and are not used to any gentle handling. They do quite well in the poorest of desert soils. Watering them too much or too often WILL murder them.

Ad


To get them to bloom you usually have to stop watering them and almost kill them. There are hundreds of regional varieties that bloom from pale yellow all the way to magenta. On the Bowie Trail I even saw a yellow / bright red two-tone version.

Have a look at my dad's site at http://dawna.com
He started with Opuntias about 30 years ago after he retired.
Have FUN!
DearWebby

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Related Content
In This Guide
Potted Cactus
Saving a Broken Cactus
Categories
Home and Garden Gardening CactusJuly 19, 2016
Guides
Rooting Hormone
Make Your Own Rooting Hormone
A jar of honey.
Using Honey to Root Cuttings
Privet branch against a white background
Rooting Privet Hedge Branches
Rooting a Spider Plant - spider plant in flask
Rooting Plants in Water
More
🎃
Halloween Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Desktop Page | View Mobile

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

© 1997-2017 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Published by .

Generated 2017/10/06 17:23:42 in 666 msecs. ⛅️️ ⚡️
Loading Something Awesome!