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Growing Rainier Cherries from Seed

Can I get some help on starting Rainier cherry trees from the seeds? I just ate some and they are so good. I have saved the seeds. Do I need to dry them or soak them before planting in pots or what? Thanks so much for your help.

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Hardiness Zone: 7a

By Mikeinva from Roanoke, VA

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July 19, 20090 found this helpful
Best Answer

I have started many cherry trees from the pits left from canning. I don't know if Rainier cherries will grow true to their parent plant or not, but if you have the space, why not give it a shot? If it doesn't work, you can always have a horticulture student graft some Rainier cherry branches onto your tree. Best of luck!

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July 28, 20130 found this helpful
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I also don't know if a true rainier cherry will come from its pit. I do know that cherries are like peaches and called "stone fruit" because the pit is hard like a stone. Putting a pit in a moisten wet cloth will do nothing but create a moldy wash cloth or bunch of paper towels. The tree will start only after the "stone" has cracked, usually after sitting out all winter with the freezing of winter doing the cracking.

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May 23, 20170 found this helpful

I left mines out to dry for two days and they all started to crack. I then soak them in a towel and left it for two days now. Nothing yet. Please do tell me if I am doing this right or not.

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June 10, 20172 found this helpful
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From the Seattle Times (http://communit  p;slug=rainier15)

The Rainier, like all named varieties of fruit, won't sprout from a pit. Rather, it is planted from a rootstock that grafts two varieties of cherries together: the familiar Bing and the less-known Van.

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July 9, 20091 found this helpful

I don't know about cherry pits, but I have some cherry pits also and I am going to do what I did with lemon, grapefruit and orange seeds. I set them in a washcloth (nice thick one) folded over the seeds and saturate the washcloth with water daily, or more often if the house is dry. Keep constantly moist and they should sprout in a couple of weeks. Then plant them in potting soil and keep evenly moist. I have numberous lemon, grapefruit and orange trees. If this doesn't work at least I know I tried. If you come up with a better way please let me know. Good luck!

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July 19, 20090 found this helpful

P.S. All I did was throw them in the garden. At least one out of ten came up with no more encouragement than that.

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July 15, 20160 found this helpful

I have used this technique successfully, with several different types of hard seeds... Take a nail file & very carefully sand off a area at the bottom of the seed- but be careful not to damage the seed inside. This will allow water to penetrate the seed, causing it to crack open slightly as the sprouting begins.
I have used this same method for Zinnias & other flowering plants- however, keep in mind that this method is NOT practical for tiny seeds. As long as the seed is large enough to hold onto & safely abrade the hard outer shell, they will begin sprouting in a matter of days!

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By far, the most difficult seed I have successfully sprouted is the lotus... The process consists of specific/different steps that MUST be followed precisely, in order to get the seed to start growing- in all, it takes an ENTIRE MONTH! I challenged a couple of friends to see who could get their lotus seed to start growing... I was the only one who could do it. But my reward was not for the bragging rights of the challenge. It appeared as a gorgeous cream, pink, glowing gold bloom with a neon green center, that would have completely covered a dinner plate. Definitely a breathtaking sight!

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June 1, 20172 found this helpful
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I know this is a VERY late reply and I just ate two kinds of cherries and will be trying to grow trees with the pits. After a little research, the best instruction that I found for me since I live in Texas is to wash the seed thoroughly, let dry in a sunny location for up to 5 days. Store in the refrigerator inside a wet paper towel in a zip lock bag or container for at least 10 weeks to 3 months, keeping the towel moist and not wet. Take out of the fridge and let come to room temperature for a day. Plant in a seed starter or pot with a light sandy mixture about 1 inch thick. Set planters in sunny spot receiving at least 6 hours of sunlight a day. Keep moist, NOT wet and wait for them to spout in a couple of months or so. After they sprout, plant in the yard, mulch, protect from deer and rodents and enjoy!

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July 25, 20170 found this helpful

I just got three Ranier cherry seeds to germinate. What you do is use a pliers to crack the shell of the pit off the actual seed. I did that to about eight seeds and wrapped then in a damp pair l paper towel in a container under the sun. I am now putting them in soil to see if they will keep growing.

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June 12, 20170 found this helpful

My mother is a green thumb. She has grapefruit, apple, lemon, guavas, and avocado tree. Not to mention ground rooted veggies. She takes seeds from eaten produce, dries them in open air and then wraps them in a moist napkin, and wraps in foil. She places in a sunny spot for a couple weeks until a sprout comes out. Then transfers into a small pot with good draining holes. She gifted me an apple tree when we bought our new home and it was just a small 8 inch plant. It has grown into 4 feet now and thriving.

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July 23, 20170 found this helpful

I'm getting ready to also start from seed. Best research I did was to dry in sun throughly. File outer shell some to weaken hardness. Don't sand through to internal seedlet. Throw in freezer fir a month. Supposed to trick seed into dormant winter period. Take out, start your process if seed sprouting either watered towels or small starter dirt plots. Keep well watered daily. Seeds should sprout in a couple weeks.

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