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Growing an Apple Mango Tree

How do you grow an Apple Mango tree?

By NITIN PARADKAR from Konkan

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February 7, 20100 found this helpful

Mangos are sweet and juicy tropical fruits that pack a lot of vitamins. As trees, they grow tall and leafy providing your backyard with some good shade. It even gives off a sweet aroma when it's flowering or if the fruits are beginning to ripen. In any case, if you want to grow your own mango tree in your yard, here are some steps on how to grow one from a mango pit.

Growing a Seedling
Prepare a bed of potting soil. Place the pit flat on the top and push it straight down. Keep the pit damp and place it where it can have sustained warmth. Mango pits usually grow the roots first and eventually sprout a seedling. This process usually takes about a month.

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Preparing Your Backyard
All you have to do is to dig a hole that will be big enough to accommodate the seedling with the ball of potting material. Remember to keep the excavated soil for refilling afterward.

Planting
Carefully set the seedling into the hole. Cover it and gaps with soil. It's said that it's best to do this on the onset of rain.

Watering, Plant Food, and Care
Keep the seedling well irrigated at least to keep the soil from drying out. The young seedling needs much care during its first few months. Newly planted seedlings (year-old ones) may benefit from a small dose of pure fertilizer (around 300 grams). Weeds can also affect seedling growth.

Waiting for Your Tree to Grow
Well, the next step is practically keeping an eye on it for pests and parasites. Eventually, your young seedling will grow to be a young tree and eventually, start to bear fruits. But you have to be patient since it takes years for you to have a healthy, fruit-bearing mango tree. Good luck.

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February 9, 20100 found this helpful

A caution about Mangos! It is possible to be very allergic to them and the juice from the skin is the worst part. It will manifest itself with blisters similar to a case of poison oak.

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This can come from contact with the mango or inhaling the steam from cooking mangos. Actually, poison oak and mangos are botanically related.

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February 19, 20190 found this helpful

It appears that there are two varieties that are called "Apple Mango", one from the Philippines and one from Japan. But the care should be the same as any other mango tree. Kathleen's advice looks good to me.

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