Birds Showing Up at Your Bird Feeder

I would like to hear what people in other parts of the country are seeing at their bird feeders. Since the winter finches are making a southerly push this fall, there may be some interesting birds showing up at your feeders. Some of the birds to look out for will be pine siskins, red and white-winged crossbills, Bohemian waxwings, common and hoary redpolls, red-breasted nuthatches, maybe some others.

Larry from Saint Joseph, MO

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

The photo I posted above is a Winter Wren. This is a regular visitor to Missouri during the colder months of the year. This was one which we banded at Missouri Western State University Campus, Saint Joseph, Missouri.

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

Here's what we get in the southeastern corner of Virginia: cardinals, titmice,nuthatches, siskins, black-capped and Carolina chickadees, Virginia creepers, house and Carolina wrens, purple and house finches, painted buntings, redwings,juncos, peewees, viereos, towhees, cowbirds, red-breasted grosbeaks, bluejays, almost every kind of sparrow.

And of course, the "nuisance" birds like grackles. Also the "passing throughs" like warblers. Mockingbirds love my feeders,too -- they don't eat anything, they just like to chase the other birds away!

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

I live in cold Nova Scotia Canada. We get blue jays lookin for peanuts in a shell. They take all they can get and hide them and come back later and seem to know exactly where they are hidden. Sometimes the crows find them first! I wish we had the variety that you have in a warm climate. Happy bird watching from Canada

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

This afternoon we had a little Red-breasted Nuthatch show up at our backyard feeders.

It is a little unusual for us to get these. Our regular visitors unclude, Downy, Hairy and Red-headed Woodpeckers, Northern Flickers, Black-capped Chickcadees, White-breasted Nuthatches, American Goldfinch, Blue Jays, Northern Cardinals, Dark-eyed Juncos, Common Grackles, House Sparrows and European Starlings.

Maybe this winter we will get an Evening Grosbeak. I have not ever seen one of these in Missouri!

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

In southern Australia we are in spring. The birds that are visiting our feeder are Sulphur Crested Cockatoos, sparrows, pink galahs, wattle birds, scarlet brow finches, crimson rosellas, native thrush, blue fairy wrens and bush wrens. We feed out a wild parrot bird mix and there seems to be something for all of them. We spent many happy hours watching their antics.

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November 15, 20070 found this helpful

We had a bear bend our bird feeder in half last week to get to the feed. We live in Central Pennsylvania. I think that is the biggest "bird" we have ever attracted...

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November 16, 20070 found this helpful

TDunleavy, a Black Bear would be awesome!

But I think I would rather get an Evening Grosbeak or Bohemian Waxwing. Are you getting either one of these at your feeders?

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November 16, 20070 found this helpful

I love the birds that turn up at my feeder everyday. They are red birds, blue jays, mourning doves, cow birds, wood peckers titmice and nuthatches and some that I really don't know what they are, I just know that I love watching them.

I live in Va.Down the road a little ways from Roanoke Va.

Thanks for asking this question, as it was interesting to see what all types of birds everyone else has as well.

Teresa from Va.

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November 16, 20070 found this helpful

Housefinches, goldfinches american, lesser goldfinch, black-capped chickees, bushtits, scrub jay, house sparrows, oregon junco, from Springfield, Or

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November 26, 20070 found this helpful

Here is one of the photos I took of the little Red-breasted Nuthatch on the peanut feeder in our backyard. This was November 22 (Thanksgiving Day).

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December 5, 20070 found this helpful

We are averaging 10 - 12 species of birds daily coming to our feeders. A couple of our favorites are the Red-breasted Nuthatch and the Carolina Wren. Others coming are Downy and Red-bellied Woodpeckers, American Goldfinches, House Sparrows, Dark-eyed Juncos (some people call these, "Snow Birds"), Blue Jays, Northern Cardinals, White-breasted Nuthatches, etc.

For some reason we are not getting the Black-capped Chickadees. This species is usually one of the most commonly found bird coming to feeders. I am not sure why we are not getting them in our yard. Is anyone else noticing the absence of these birds at their feeders?

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December 8, 20070 found this helpful

I haven't seen any black capped chickadees either or much of anything else this year. I think it's all the stray cats roaming around the neighborhood, they eat the bird seed and, I fear, they're eating the birds, too. Well, I guess the poor cats are just trying to survive. Now that the leaves have fallen off the trees I found something surprizing and amusing: a bird nest with a big ziplock plastic bag woven into it! Half of the bag is sticking up almost as if it were a roof to shelter the nest. What kind of bird would do this and why? My mother said she saw bluejays going in and out of this tree all summer but the nest looks kind of small for a bird that size(on the other hand, mourning doves are rather large but have a small nest). Any theories, anybody?

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December 9, 20070 found this helpful

Today at our feeder we had:

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Blue Jay

Black-capped Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Common Grackle

House Finch

American Goldfinch

House Sparrow

Still no Pine Siskins, Purple Finch or any of the other "hope for" birds.

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December 16, 20070 found this helpful

I live in Massachusetts just noth west of Worcester. I beleive I saw a red bellied woodpecker at my feeder this morning. Just wondering if this is unusual for this bird to be this far north?

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December 16, 20070 found this helpful

Red-belllied Woodpeckers are routinely found in the eastern half of the US. Only in the extreme northern parts of the northern tier of states would they be found only occasionally. I would say that they would be found in your area pretty regularly. Once it has found your feeder I would also suspect that it will be returning as long as you have seed/peanuts in your feeders.

** Your photo is of a Red-bellied Woodpecker.

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December 22, 20070 found this helpful

We are experiencing a winter blizzard here in Saint Joseph, Missouri. The weather man gave a forecast of 1 to 3 inches of snow, wind at up to 35 miles per hour and low temperatures to 20 degrees F.

Presently there is about 10 inches of snow on the ground (and it is still snowing), the wind is blowing quite heavily and it is 23 degrees F.

The birds are "attacking the feeders". They almost seem to be in a "feeding frenzy". We are getting House Sparrows, House Finches, Downy Woodpeckers, Red-belllied Woodpeckers, Dark-eyed Juncos (affectionately, called "Snow Birds"), White-breasted Nuthatches, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Carolina Wrens, Northern Cardinals and American Goldfinches. There has been a constant mix of these birds (about 50), all trying to fill their gizzards before nightfall.

I wonder what outside will look like in the morning!

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December 23, 20070 found this helpful

Well, it is a sunny morning here in Saint Joseph, Missouri, and it seems all the regulars are back at our feeders. It is only 18 degrees F. but the birds are feeding in a much more leisurely manner this morning. In addition to the birds showing up yesterday, we have added a couple of Black-capped Chickadees this morning.

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December 23, 20070 found this helpful

Here is a Blue Jay getting a little bit of breakfast from the peanut feeder.

So far this morning we have had fourteen (14) species visit.

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December 25, 20070 found this helpful

This Christmas morning there was a pretty good showing of various birds at our backyard bird feeders.

American Goldfinches

Dark-eyed Juncos

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Brown Creeper (in trees near the feeders)

Downy Woodpeckers

Carolina Wren

House Finches

European Starlings (in trees near the feeders)

Pine Siskin (1) on niger seed sock with the goldfinches

Black-capped Chickadees

Red-breasted Nuthatches (2)

House Sparrows

Northern Flicker

Northern Cardinals

Blue Jay

White-breasted Nuthatch

and

a fly over Red-tailed Hawk

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December 26, 20070 found this helpful

Today, the day after Christmas, we had seven PINE SISKINS show up at our backyard feeding station. They were congregating with the American Goldfinches on the niger seed, sock feeder.

Two RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES continue to be daily visitors to our peanut feeder.

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December 26, 20070 found this helpful

Here is a photo of one of the two Carolina Wrens we have coming to the peanut feeder we have on our feeding station.

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March 31, 20080 found this helpful

The starlings and Common Grackles have been coming to our backyard feeders lately. They tend to be aggressive and cause the smaller birds to take flight. When these bigger birds do leave the feeder area the nuthatches, siskins, goldfinches, Carolina Wrens and other regulars return. * The male American Goldfinches are beginning to molt into their brilliant, golden yellow plumage now!

Come on Spring!

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